News Posts matching #CMP 30HX

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A Sign of the Times: Hong Kong Authorities Dismantle Smuggling Operation... Which Included 300 NVIDIA CMP Cards

A sign of the times indeed, when secretive, smuggling boats add NVIDIA CMP graphics cards to their cargo instead of other illegal goods. That's what just happened in Hong Kong, where authorities with the Hong Kong Customs and Excise Department seized a smuggling fishing boat that was unsuspectingly (or maybe not so unsuspectingly) anchored just outside the Hong Kong International Airport. While some of the smuggled goods were par of the course for the authorities - exotic foods and high-value, low-footprint technological gadgets such as smartphones and tablets - the smugglers were also carrying 300 unmarked NVIDIA CMP 30HX GPUs.

That they were unmarked means they were deviated from the assembly lines before they were actually processed for final packaging, and thus we're now looking at definite proof of shipments being deviated from their intended destinations - which means this happens not only for CMP cards, but also for consumer-grade RTX 30-series. Another day at the office of post-COVID, production shortages, and mining boom, as it relates to computer hardware pieces.

First NVIDIA Palit CMP 30HX Mining GPU Available at a Tentative $723

NVIDIA's recently-announced CMP (Cryptocurrency Mining Processor) products seem to already be hitting the market - at least in some parts of the world. Microless, a retailer in Dubai, listed the cryptocurrency-geared graphics card for $723 - $723 which are equivalent to some 26 MH/s, as per NVIDIA, before any optimizatons have been enacted on the clock/voltage/BIOS level, as more serious miners will undoubtedly do.

The CMP 30HX is a re-released TU116 chip (Turing, sans RT hardware), which powered the likes of the GeForce GTX 1660 Super in NVIDIA's previous generation of graphics cards. The card features a a 1,530 MHz base clock; a 1,785 MHz boost clock; alongside 6 GB of GDDR6 memory that clocks in at 14 Gbps (which actually could soon stop being enough to hold the entire workload completely in memory). Leveraging a 192-bit memory interface, the graphics card supplies a memory bandwidth of up to 336 GB/s. It's also a "headless" GPU, meaning that it has no display outputs that would only add to cost in such a specifically-geared product. It's unclear how representative the pricing from Microless actually is of NVIDIA's MSRP for the 30HX products, but considering current graphics cards' pricing worldwide, this pricing seems to be in line with GeForce offerings capable of achieving the same hash rates, so its ability to concentrate demand from miners compared to other NVIDIA mainstream, GeForce offerings depends solely on the prices that are both set by NVIDIA and practiced by retailers.
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