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AMD Admits "Stars" in Ryzen Master Don't Correspond to CPPC2 Preferred Cores

AMD in a blog post earlier today explained that there is no 1:1 correlation between the "best core" grading system displayed in Ryzen Master, and the "preferred cores" addressed by the Windows 10 Scheduler using CPPC2 (Collaborative Power and Performance Control 2). Deployed through BIOS and AMD chipset drivers, CPPC2 forms a middleware between OS and processor, communicating the system's performance demands at a high frequency of 1 ms (Microsoft's default speed for reporting performance states to processors is 15 ms). Ryzen Master, on the other hand, has had the ability to reveal the "best" cores in a Ryzen processor by ranking them across the package, on a CCD (die), and within a CCX. The best core in a CCX is typically marked with a "star" symbol on the software's UI. The fastest core on the package gets a gold star. Dots denote second fastest cores in a CCX.

Over the past couple of months we've posted several investigative reports by our Ryzen memory overclocking guru Yuri "1usmus" Bubly, and a recurring theme with our articles has been to highlight the discrepancy between the highest performing cores as tested by us not corresponding to those highlighted in Ryzen Master. Our definition of "highest performing cores" has been one that's able to reach and sustain the highest boost states, and has the best electrical properties. AMD elaborates that the CPPC2 works independently from the SMU API Ryzen Master uses, and the best cores mapped by Ryzen Master shouldn't correspond with preferred cores reported by CPPC2 to the OS scheduler, so it could send more workload to these cores, benefiting from their higher boosting headroom.
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