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SilverStone Intros AD120-DC Pico Power Supply

SilverStone today introduced the AD120-DC, a pico power-supply designed for SFF builds without enough room for PSU, and which rely on power-bricks. It is, quite literally, a 120 W power brick that puts out a 12 V, 2-pin DC output. You can either plug this directly to motherboards that have 2-pin DC inputs, or use the included distribution board that takes in this 2-pin DC input, and uses DC-to-DC switching to put out a conventional 24-pin ATX connector, an 8-pin EPS, and various peripheral connectors such as SATA power, Molex, etc. The brick measures 160 mm x 25 mm x 45 mm (DxHxW). The company didn't reveal pricing or availability.

BittWare Launches IA-840F with Intel Agilex FPGA and Support for oneAPI

BittWare, a Molex company, today unveiled the IA-840F, the company's first Intel Agilex -based FPGA card designed to deliver significant performance-per-watt improvements for next-generation data center, networking and edge compute workloads. Agilex FPGAs deliver up to 40% higher performance or up to 40% lower power, depending on application requirements. BittWare maximized I/O features using the Agilex chip's unique tiling architecture with dual QSFP-DDs (4× 100G), PCIe Gen4 x16, and three MCIO expansion ports for diverse applications. BittWare also announced support for Intel oneAPI, which enables an abstracted development flow for dramatically simplified code re-use across multiple architectures.

"Modern data center workloads are incredibly diverse, requiring customers to implement a mix of scalar, vector, matrix and spatial architectures," said Craig Petrie, vice president of marketing for BittWare. "The IA-840F ensures that customers can quickly and easily exploit the advanced features of the Intel Agilex FPGA. For those customers who prefer to develop FPGA applications at an abstracted level, we are including support for oneAPI. This new unified software programming environment allows customers to program the Agilex FPGA from a single code base with native high-level language performance across architectures."

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 Founders Edition Pictured in the Flesh

Here's one of the first clear pictures of an NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 Founders Edition graphics card pictured in the flesh (that isn't an NVIDIA press-shot or render). A PC enthusiast in China with access to Founders Edition cards of all three RTX 3000 series cards announced on September 1, posted a family shot, which provides a nice size comparison.

The RTX 3070 Founders Edition is noticeably shorter than the RTX 3080 FE. Both cards are dwarfed by the RTX 3090 FE. Unlike the RTX 3080 and RTX 3090, the RTX 3070 FE uses a more conventional approach to air-flow, with both of its cards on the obverse side of the card, even through the second fan still pushes some of its airflow through the PCB, through a partial cutout. All three cards use the 12-pin Molex MicroFit 3.0 power connector. The previous generation flagship RTX 2080 Ti is the butt of gamer memes thanks to the RTX 3070, as NVIDIA advertised it as being faster than the RTX 2080 Ti at half its price of $499 (starting price). This announcement has forced some RTX 2080 Ti owners to dump their cards on Ebay at throwaway prices.

FSP Rolls Out "Ampere Cable," Converts 2x 8-pin 12V to 12-pin Connector

FSP today rolled out the "Ampere Cable," an accessory that converts two 8-pin PCIe inputs from modular PSUs to the 12-pin Molex MicroFit connector standard introduced to the client segment by NVIDIA and its GeForce RTX 3000 "Ampere" Founders Edition graphics cards. The cables are compatible with any modular PSU that has 8-pin 12 V connectors that put out 8-pin PCIe. It should work with all FSP branded modular PSUs, as well as modular PSUs of other brands that use Fortron as their OEM source. FSP is Fortron's DIY channel brand. FSP is setting up web-forms for existing owners of FSP power supplies to claim a free unit.

Update Sep 10th: FSP has informed us that they have decided to not sell this cable

Silverstone Intros DA1650 High-Wattage Modular PSU

SilverStone today introduced the DA1650, a 1650 W high-end PSU. With a length of 180 mm, the DA1650 has some of the highest power densities on the market, more so given that it's a fully modular PSU (modular cabling adds to the length of a PSU). The extreme Wattage enables the PSU to run completely fanless up to 30% of its capacity or 495 W. Under the hood, the DA1650 features a single +12 V rail design, with a gargantuan 137.5 A rail. It features DC-to-DC switching, active PFC, and most common electrical protections, against over/under-voltage, overload (if you try to crank a truck with this thing), overheat, and short-circuit.

The SilverStone DA1650 offers 80 Plus Gold efficiency, along with ETA A and Lambda S+ certifications. The PSU is designed for 24/7 continuous operation in an environment with up to 50 °C ambient temperature. It uses a 135 mm fluid-dynamic bearing fan to keep cool. Connectors include one 24-pin ATX, four 4+4 pin EPS, twelve 6+2 pin PCIe power, sixteen SATA power, six Molex, and a Berg.

Update Aug 27th: SilverStone informed us that the DA1650 will be backed by a 5-year warranty, and priced at USD $330.

NVIDIA "Ampere" 12-pin Power Connector Pictured Some More

Korean tech publication QuasarZone posted three high-res pictures of the new Molex Micro-Fit 3.0 12-pin connector that NVIDIA adapted for its GeForce "Ampere" graphics cards, at least the reference-design Founders Edition ones. As we detailed extensively in an older article, the 12-pin connector has significantly smaller pins than the standard PCIe power connectors, and is only slightly longer than an 8-pin PCIe power connector. Placed side by side, you can tell how the PCIe connector is taller, if not wider. Despite its relatively compact dimensions, the 12-pin connector is rumored to be rated for a significantly higher power delivery than the 8-pin connector, with some of the oldest reports even suggesting 600 W. The cables going into the 12-pin connector appear to be of a higher gauge than the ones making up the 8-pin. NVIDIA in a video presentation released on Wednesday explained how it plans its upcoming GeForce graphics cards to address many fundamental engineering problems with modern graphics cards, in the areas of efficiency heat dissipation, board durability, and power delivery.

1stPlayer Shows Off Steampunk Line of PSUs and Extension Cables

1stPlayer unveiled quite a few new products this Computex, beginning with the Steampunk line of power supplies and power accessories. The Steampunk series consists of fully-modular PSUs in upper-mid range capacities such as 750W. These PSUs come in two physical variants, all-black, and white with RGB-LED illuminated 140 mm fans. Like most other PSUs launched this year, the 750W Steampunk includes two 4+4 pin EPS connectors, besides four 6+2 pin PCIe power, six SATA power, and three Molex. A single +12V rail design and most common electrical protections make for the rest of it.

1stPlayer also unveiled a series of Steampunk-branded PSU extension cables purchasable separately from the PSUs. These include colorful fiber braided sleeved individual cables of various shapes and sizes (24-pin, 8-pin EPS, 6+2-pin PCIe, etc.,), or illuminated cables with addressable RGB LED lighting up each cable.

ASUS ROG Strix Line of 80 Plus Gold PSUs Debut

ASUS kicked the door open to barge into the gaming PC PSU market with the ROG Thor high-end PSU last Computex. This year, the company is biting into the meat of the performance gaming market with the new ROG Strix PSU family, making its debut with a 650W model. This PSU offers low idle noise due to excessively large heatsinks, an ASUS-innovation Axial-Tech fan that's designed to direct all of its airflow downwards, with no sideways bleed; full modular cabling, and some cosmetic customization options, including a pair of magnetic stickers. Cabling includes two 4+4 pin EPS connectors, four 6+2 pin PCIe, nine SATA power, and a trio of Molex connectors. ASUS plans to expand this series in both directions.

ASUS Intros ROG Aura Terminal

ASUS introduced the Republic of Gamers (ROG) Aura Terminal, an RGB LED control module that puts out four addressable RGB LED channels. This box plugs into one of your motherboard's USB 2.0 headers to interface with Aura Sync RGB software, and power is drawn either from a 4-pin Molex connector (if installed inside your case), or from a 45W power brick (if installed externally).

The ROG Aura Terminal supports up to 90 LEDs per channel, and up to 210 LEDs in all, working out to up to 4.2 meters in addressable RGB LED strips. The package includes two 30 cm and one 60 cm RGB LED strips, a 45W power adapter, a Molex to 2-pin DC adapter, a 9-pin USB 2.0 header to USB type-A adapter, stickers, and cable ties. ASUS Aura Sync RGB software is used to control all outputs from the box, including its glowing ROG logo. You also get ROG Halo, a feature that lets you task RGB LED strips stuck behind your monitor to work as ambient mood-lighting. The company didn't reveal pricing.

MSI Launching Coffee Lake-Supporting H310-F PRO Mining Motherboard With 13 Expansion Slots

MSI is in the throes of launching a socket LGA 1151, Coffee Lake-based motherboard that's geared for cryptocurrency mining. Apparently looking to cater to the mining enthusiast that wants the latest silicon even in the CPU department of their mining setup, it's still hard to imagine something other than the upcoming Pentium or Celerons will ever make their way to this motherboard - not in any sane miners' mind, surely.

Despite Supporting Coffee Lake processors and including 1x PCIe x16 and 12x PCIe 1x slots, MSI has taken steps to reduce unneeded features as much as possible, as the usual workloads for this kind of hardware don't really require more than some basic inputs and outputs. A pair of Molex connectors allows for more power to be delivered to the graphics cards employed on this motherboard, and only 2x DDR4 DIMM slots - smart cost-savings for the market demographic. Everything else is as bare and minimal as possible - the 1x HDMI and 1x DVI video output, sound connectors, 2x USB 2.0 and 2x USB 3.0 slots... One can see the preparations for some more 5x PCIe x1 slots to be added to a motherboard - just not to this one, since it can't handle that many graphics expansion slots. Maybe on some upcoming motherboard that simply reuses this design and trades the H310 chipset for something a little beefier on that front?

Thermaltake Intros the Riing Plus 20 RGB TT Premium Edition Fan

Thermaltake today introduced the Riing Plus 20 RGB TT Premium Edition, a large 200 mm fan studded with RGB LEDs. The 30 mm-thick fan features a 11-blade impeller backed by a motor that features hydraulic bearing; and a fan frame with 24 RGB diodes studded along the bore of the frame, which support 16.7 million colors. What's interesting about this fan is that it plugs into your motherboard via the 9-pin USB 2.0/1.1 header, from which it not just powers the fan and the lighting, but also takes in software control for both.

The included Digital Lighting Controller (DLC) module ensures you don't run out of USB headers if you have many of these fans, by taking input from one header (two 500 mA inputs), and putting out three USB headers for up to three fans. Additional power is drawn from a 4-pin Molex input. The Tt RGB Plus software lets you control the fan on your PC, and through a connected smartphone. As a fan itself, the Riing Plus 20 RGB spins between 500 to 1,000 RPM, pushing up to 118 CFM of air, at up to 29.2 dBA of noise output. Available now as a single-pack that includes one fan, the DLC, and cables, the Riing Plus 20 RGB TT Premium Edition is priced at USD $59.99.

ASUS Intros B250 Mining Expert Motherboard with 19 PCIe Slots

ASUS dropped its hat into the DIY crypto-currency mining hardware craze, with the introduction of the B250 Mining Expert motherboard. This ATX form-factor motherboard comes with a jaw-dropping eighteen PCI-Express gen 3.0 x1 slots, in addition to a PCI-Express gen 3.0 x16, taking full advantage of the 200-series platform's PCIe lane budget. The board draws power from three 24-pin ATX, one 8-pin EPS, and three 4-pin Molex connectors, although besides one ATX and EPS, the other connectors are optional for the machine to start, but required for some of those PCIe slots to work.

Based on the Intel B250 Express chipset, the board supports 6th and 7th generation "Skylake" and "Kaby Lake" processors. The rest of the board is pretty spartan, with just enough connectivity to make the machine work. You get two DDR4 DIMM slots supporting up to 32 GB of dual-channel memory, four SATA 6 Gbps ports, six USB 3.0 ports (two via header), a gigabit Ethernet connection, 6-channel HD audio, HDMI display output, and legacy PS/2 connectors. The company didn't reveal pricing.

Molex Introduces New Micro-Fit 3.0 Connectors

Molex's Micro-Fit 3.0 Connector Systems, available in multiple circuit sizes and cable lengths for power applications, offer a 3.00mm pitch, a 10.0A maximum current rating and many design options such as a terminal position assurance, blind-mating and compliant pin features. The Molex's Micro-Fit Connector Family offers 10.0A with a 3.00mm pitch, delivering power in a compact package in wire-to-wire and wire-to-board configurations. OEMs often need power connectors in space-constrained applications.

Micro-Fit 3.0 BMI Connectors are designed for blind-mating applications. They allow mating misalignment (per product drawing). In hard-to-reach applications, such as drawers or fan assembly trays, connectors need to be mated and unmated without being seen. Doing so can cause damage to the connector and/or terminal and consume valuable labor time.
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