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AMD Radeon RX 6000 "Big Navi" RDNA2 Reference Design Pictured

AMD revealed its Radeon RX 6000 series graphics card reference design. This card will likely be AMD's flagship product based on its RDNA2 graphics architecture. The card features a refreshing new dual-slot, triple axial fan cooling solution that uses large new high-airflow fans that have webbed impellers, and an aluminium fin-stack heatsink that spans the entire length of this roughly-30 cm long card. A variation of the insert with the Radeon branding was teased last year. This is AMD's second reference design with triple axial fans, after the Radeon VII.

The card features two 8-pin PCIe power inputs right where you expect them. Display outputs include a pair of DisplayPorts, an HDMI, and a USB type-C. Since air exhaust is guided out of the top of the card with its fin-stack arrangement (and none from the rear I/O), AMD has a sealed I/O shield like the Radeon Fury. AMD partnered with Epic Games for a Fortnite treasure-hunt map that lets you see a 3D model of the card in from more angles. We'll spare you the treasure hunt with a video by Anshel Sag.
The Fortnite video follows.

AMD Radeon Software Crimson ReLive Drivers Released

AMD has just announced their 2016 major software update release (following Catalyst Omega in 2014 and Crimson Edition in 2015). It's dubbed the "Crimson ReLive" release (numbered 12.6.1), and is purported to bring a lot of features and performance improvements across the board for AMD products, as has been historically achieved by AMD with these annual driver releases. This time, there's just one other thing: game recording and streaming through the built-in ReLive app. It serves as a streaming app that works for both professional, developer and consumer use cases. It supports major streaming giants (such as Twitch and YouTube), includes an in-app toolbar and custom overlay, and is apparently going to feature its own tab inside AMD's updated driver suite, with minimal reported impact on performance.

As always, you can grab the drivers right here on TPU: just follow the links below. And for more information, benchmarks, and a run-through of the new driver and its features, check out TPU's review of the driver suite, right here.
Download: AMD Radeon Software Crimson ReLive Edition 16.12.1 for Windows 10 64-bit | Windows 10 32-bit | Windows 8.1 64-bit | Windows 8.1 32-bit | Windows 7 64-bit | Windows 7 32-bit

Third-Generation HBM Could Enable Graphics Cards with 64GB Memory

One of the first drafts of the HBM3 specification reveals that the standard could enable graphics cards with up to 64 GB of video memory. The HBM2 memory, which is yet to make its consumer graphics debut, caps out at 32 GB, and the first-generation HBM, which released with the AMD Radeon Fury series, at just 4 GB.

What's more, HBM3 doubles bandwidth over HBM2, pushing up to 512 GB/s per stack. A 4096-bit HBM3 equipped GPU could have up to 2 TB/s (yes, terabytes per second) of memory bandwidth at its disposal. SK Hynix, one of the key proponents of the HBM standard, even claims that HBM3 will be both more energy-efficient and cost-effective than existing memory standards, for the performance on offer. Some of the first HBM3 implementations could come from the HPC industry, with consumer implementations including game consoles, graphics cards, TVs, etc., following later.

AMD Radeon Fury X2 Reference Air Cooled?

AMD, which has been timing its upcoming dual-GPU "Fiji" graphics card to launch sometime this year, may have demoed a production version of the card in one of its launch partners, Falcon Northwest's, Tiki high-end gaming desktop, as a "VR developer box." AMD's Roy Taylor, in a recent tweet, captions a picture of this dev box as being "the world's best DirectX 12 VR developer box," leading the press to speculate that it's running the company's dual-GPU "Fiji" card.

A close look at AMD's VR dev box, through its windowed graphics card compartment, reveals an air-cooled AMD reference graphics card, which VideoCardz' trigonometry pins as being shorter than a Radeon R9 390X reference board. It could be a reference R9 380X, but then a reference dual-GPU "Fiji" PCB is roughly of the same length, and a R9 380X wouldn't earn the title of being the "world's best" from a senior AMD exec while there are faster AMD cards, such as the R9 Fury. The ability of the full-spec "Fiji" silicon to cope well with a rather simple air-cooler in the R9 Nano fans even more speculation that a dual-GPU "Fiji" board could make do with a powerful air-channel cooler.

GFXBench Validation Confirms Stream Processor Count of Radeon Fury

Someone with access to an AMD Radeon Fury sample put it through the compute performance test of GFXBench, and submitted its score to the suite's online score database. Running on pre-launch drivers, the sample is read as simply "AMD Radeon Graphics Processor." Since a GPGPU app is aware of how many compute units (CUs) a GPU has (so it could schedule its parallel processing workloads accordingly), GFXBench was able to put out a plausible-sounding CU count of 64. Since Radeon Fury is based on Graphics CoreNext, and since each CU holds 64 stream processors, the stream processor count on the chip works out to be 4,096.

AMD Radeon Graphics Roadmap for 2015 Leaked

It looks like AMD's desktop discrete GPU lineup for 2015 will see a mix of rebrands, re-codename, and one big new chip, all making up the new Radeon R7 300 and R9 300 series. Cards based in this lineup should begin rolling out this month. Leaks from OEMs such as this one, suggest that the first of these should begin rolling out as early as June 16.

The spread is pretty cut and dry. "Hawaii," the chip driving the R9 290 series, will not only get a new codename as "Grenada," but also a seamless rebrand to the R9 390 series, with Grenada Pro making up the R9 390, and Grenada XT making up the R9 390X. One possibility could be AMD taking advantage of low 4 Gbit GDDR5 chip prices to cram 8 GB of standard memory amount, across Grenada's 512-bit wide memory interface. The R9 390X will compete with the GeForce GTX 970, while the R9 390 will offer an option in the vast price and performance gorge between the GTX 960 and GTX 970.

AMD "Fiji XT" SKU Name Revealed, ATI Rage Legacy Reborn?

Since March, we've been hearing whispers that AMD could give the topmost tier SKU based on its swanky new HBM-equipped "Fiji" silicon a fancy name, just as NVIDIA names its top-dog the GTX TITAN. That name could be the AMD Radeon FURY. A similar name to the brand that launched the erstwhile ATI, with its Rage series, Radeon FURY will be AMD's (and probably the industry's) fastest GPU, and will compete with NVIDIA's GeForce GTX TITAN X.

The card itself is quite diminutive, but that's because of two reasons - with memory being moved to the GPU package, a large amount of PCB real-estate is saved, and so the card can make do with a smaller PCB; and because the rear-end of the card is where the fittings for its AIO liquid-cooling solution are located. These tubes lead to a 120 x 120 mm radiator, with a single 120 mm PWM fan. Given that such a contraption could cool the dual-GPU R9 295X2, it should be effective with the Radeon FURY, just as well. The card will draw power from a pair of 8-pin PCIe power connectors. Display outputs will include three DP 1.2a and one HDMI 2.0. The brand naming indicates that AMD wants to change the terms on which its top-end product competes with NVIDIA's. Low noise and high-performance will be the focus, not power draw. Nobody buys an Aventador for its MPG.
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