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G.SKILL Releases Optimized DDR4-3800 CL14 Memory Kit for AMD Ryzen 3000 & X570 Platform

G.SKILL International Enterprise Co., Ltd., the world's leading manufacturer of extreme performance memory and gaming peripherals, is releasing a highly optimized, extremely low latency Trident Z Neo series DDR4-3800MHz CL14 RGB memory kit in 16 GB (8 GB x2) and 32 GB (8 GB x4) capacities for the AMD Ryzen 3000 series CPU and X570 chipset platform. Built with the powerful Samsung B-die component, this is the perfect DDR4 memory kit for those looking to push the limits of memory bandwidth on your new AMD Ryzen 3000 platform.

At this point, it's well-known that memory performance with the new AMD Ryzen 3000 processor series is best when Infinity Fabric being tied to the memory clock at a 1:1 ratio. The G.SKILL R&D team is dedicated to push the performance boundaries even further and developed a high-frequency, low-latency memory kit at DDR4-3800 CL14-16-16-36 in capacity configurations of 8GBx2 and 8GBx4, reaching a superb memory bandwidth performance under the optimal 1:1 ratio.

Silicon Lottery Starts Selling Binned 3rd Generation AMD Ryzen CPUs

Silicon Lottery, a company specializing in the process called binning which involves testing of CPUs for particular features (overclocking potential in this case), has released its portfolio of 3rd generation of Ryzen CPUs. As of now, they are offering only Ryzen 7 and Ryzen 9 models, covering Ryzen 7 3700X, 3800X and Ryzen 9 3900X. Ryzen 9 3950X is said to be introduced in September and that is the date Silicon Lottery will reveal the information about overclocking potential of that model and frequencies they have achieved. Mid range Ryzen 5 models should be added at later date as well.

Reports of Ryzen 3000 High Idle Voltage Exaggerated, a Case of the "Observer Effect"

With AMD's 3rd generation Ryzen processors finally falling into the hands of PC enthusiasts, many early-adopters are taking to tech communities such as ours, to share their experiences with others. A trend appears to be emerging of users reporting higher-than-usual voltages for these processors when idling. AMD investigated this phenomenon, and declared this to be a non-issue. Apparently, most modern CPU monitoring utilities cause what is known as "the observer effect:" the process of measuring the processor's load itself causes load on the processor.

In case of the Ryzen "Matisse" processors, monitoring software appear to be polling each processor core for load by sending it instruction at a high rate of speed - sending them a workload of 20 ms every 200 ms. This causes the processor's embedded firmware to think that the cores are being subjected to workload, and it responds by increasing the clock-speeds, and proportionately voltages of all CPU cores. Monitoring software poll each CPU core, and so core voltages are raised across the chip.

PSA: No Ryzen 3000 Pre-orders Today (1st July), Spare Your F5 Key

AMD's 3rd generation Ryzen desktop processors were rumored to open to pre-orders today, so you could have your swanky new CPU upgrade in place by 7/7. It turns out, that's not the case. AMD in a statement to TechPowerUp, confirmed that there won't be any pre-orders opened by retailers today (1st July), and there is no information of any such pre-orders date. Customers will likely have to wait until the 7th to pick their PIB form their friendly neighbourhood PC hardware store, or order one online. The statement from AMD in German language translates as follows:
We haven't announced any pre-order plans - global launch is on 7/7.
AMD is launching five new processor SKUs this July, including the 12-core/24-thread Ryzen 9 3900X, the 8-core/16-thread Ryzen 7 3800X and 3700X, and the 6-core/12-thread Ryzen 5 3600X and 3600. Prices over previous-generation products remain flat wherever applicable. The 3700X is being launched at the same $329.99 MSRP as the 2700X, the 3600X at a slightly higher $249.99 compared to the $239.99 the 2600X launched at; and the 3600 aims to be the sub-$200 king at the same $199.99 price as the 2600. The 3800X is being launched as a premium 8-core option at $399.99, and the 3900X can be yours for $499.99. We expect most online retailers to mark these prices up by 5-10 percent as they normally do.

AMD Ryzen 9 PIB Package Pictured Up Close

AMD will differentiate its high-end Ryzen 9 desktop processor PIB (processor-in-a-box) retail package from that of the Ryzen 7 series with a more premium-looking box. Retailer PC Part Picker put up this picture of the Ryzen 9 box up-close, which also surfaced in E3-2019 presentations by AMD. The box is made of a thicker paperboard than the one the Ryzen 7 ships in, and features a 2-piece clamshell design, in which the upper part slides off. A faux carbon fiber texture dominates four faces of the top half, while the orange bottom one features a chrome insert with the "9" brand extension. The chip's PCI-Express gen 4.0 support earns prominent mention on the front face. The box contains the processor, an AMD Wraith Prism RGB cooling solution that's capable of handling thermal loads of up to 140W, aRGB cables for the cooler, a case badge, and some documentation. AMD will use this package for both the Ryzen 9 3900X and the flagship Ryzen 9 3950X.

The Ryzen 9 3900X will launch on 7th July, and will be AMD's top-dog until the 3950X comes along some time in September. The 3900X is a 12-core/24-thread processor clocked at 3.80 GHz with 4.60 GHz boost, designed to compete with the Core i9-9900K, and priced at USD $499. The 3950X is a 16-core/32-thread part that occupies a price-point way above, at USD $749. This chip ticks at 3.50 GHz with 4.70 GHz boost, despite its high core-count. Both chips have their TDP rated at 105W and include a Wraith Prism RGB cooling solution.

Intel Challenges AMD to Beat it in "Real World Gaming"

AMD is on the verge of launching its 3rd generation Ryzen "Matisse" processors that are widely expected to take the performance crown from Intel. At its Computex 2019 reveal, AMD CEO Dr Lisa Su claimed that these processors beat the competition in all areas, including gaming. Motherboard manufacturers threw their weight behind AMD by pulling out their most premium brands for the AMD "Valhalla" desktop platform that consists of these processors, mated with an AMD X570 chipset motherboard. Ahead of its E3 2019 keynote Monday afternoon, Intel has come out with a challenge. Chipzilla dares AMD to beat it in "real-world gaming."

At its "gaming performance for the real world" address in Los Angeles Jon Carvill, VP of marketing, challenged AMD to beat it in real world gaming with its upcoming processors. "So you're going to hear a lot about gaming CPUs this week," he began. "They may or may not come from certain three letter acronyms. That said, here's what I want to challenge you. I want to challenge you to challenge them. If they want this crown come beat us in in real world gaming, real world gaming should be the defining criteria that we use to assess the world's best gaming CPU. I challenge you to challenge anyone that wants to compete for this crown to come meet us in real world gaming. That's the measure that we're going to stand by."

ASRock X570 Aqua is a $1000 Zen2-ready Liquid-Cooled Monsterboard

We were pleasantly mistaken when we thought ASRock would stop at the X570 Phantom Gaming X or the X570 Taichi for AMD's new "Valhalla" enthusiast desktop platform. It turns out that they have a roughly-$1,000 monster motherboard in the pipes, called the X570 Aqua. Pictured below, the board is based on a slight variation of the X570 Phantom Gaming X PCB. The biggest change of course is the aluminium shroud that covers most of the board's front side. There's also a metal back-plate.

Beneath the metal shroud is what gives the board its name: a massive liquid-cooling monoblock that cools not just your processor (including heavyweights such as overclocked Ryzen 9 3900X chips), but also the CPU VRM, and the feisty AMD X570 chipset. The coolant channel first goes over the CPU through a large micro-fin lattice, then onto the X570 chipset, and finally over the CPU VRM on its way out. Much like the Phantom Gaming X, this board features daisy-chained dual-channel DDR4 memory slots designed to make the most OC out of 2-module setups.

ASUS Shows Off its X570 Motherboard Lineup: ITX Included

ASUS at a private pre-Computex event gave us a closer look at a treasure of upcoming products. The star-attractions, however, were its AMD X570 motherboard family that's spread across nearly every brand: ROG Crosshair, ROG Strix, TUF Gaming, Prime, and for the very first time for the AM4 platform, the WS series. The crown jewel of course is the mini-ITX form-factor product, the ROG Strix X570-I Gaming. This board is quite an engineering feat considering the ≥15 Watts TDP of the X570 chipset, which requires active cooling in most cases. An intricate network of heatsinks suspended along heat-pipes leading up to a dense aluminium fin-stack ventilated by a 30 mm fan, cools both the chipset and CPU VRM. ASUS designed this board to handle even the 12-core Ryzen 9 3900X, but we don't expect too much overclocking headroom.

AMD Announces 3rd Generation Ryzen Desktop Processors

AMD CEO Dr. Lisa Su at her 2019 Computex keynote address announced the 3rd generation Ryzen desktop processor family, which leverages the company's Zen 2 microarchitecture, and are built on the 7 nm silicon fabrication process at TSMC. Designed for the AM4 CPU socket, with backwards compatibility for older AMD 300-series and 400-series chipset motherboards, these processors are multi-chip modules of up to two 8-core "Zen 2" CPU chiplets, and a 14 nm I/O controller die that packs the dual-channel DDR4 memory controller and PCI-Express gen 4.0 root complex, along with some SoC connectivity. AMD claims an IPC increase of 15 percent over Zen 1, and higher clock speeds leveraging 7 nm, which add up to significantly higher performance over the current generation. AMD bolstered the core's FPU (floating-point unit), and doubled the cache sizes.

AMD unveiled three high-end SKUs for now, the $329 Ryzen 7 3700X, the $399 Ryzen 7 3800X, and the $499 Ryzen 9 3900X. The 3700X and 3800X are 8-core/16-thread parts with a single CPU chiplet. The 3700X is clocked at 3.60 GHz with 4.40 GHz maximum boost frequency, just 65 Watts TDP and will be beat Intel's Core i7-9700K both at gaming and productivity. The 3800X tops that with 3.90 GHz nominal, 4.50 GHz boost, 105W TDP, and beat the Core i9-9900K at gaming and productivity. AMD went a step further at launched the new Ryzen 9 brand with the 3900X, which is a 12-core/24-thread processor clocked at 3.80 GHz, which 4.60 boost, 72 MB of total cache, 105W TDP, and performance that not only beats the i9-9900K, but also the i9-9920X 12-core/24-thread HEDT processor despite two fewer memory channels. AMD focused on gaming performance with Zen 2, with wider FPU, improved branch prediction, and several micro-architectural improvements contributing to a per-core performance that's higher than Intel's. The processors go on sale on 7/7/2019.
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