AMD Ryzen 9 5950X Review 56

AMD Ryzen 9 5950X Review

Unboxing & Photos »

Introduction

AMD Logo

AMD "Zen 3" is here, and we have with us the Ryzen 9 5950X, the absolute king of the series. This 16-core/32-thread processor is designed to bring the HEDT (high-end desktop) segment down to the mainstream desktop platform; that is, for those who don't care much about a quad-channel memory interface or tons of PCIe lanes. The fact that HEDT chips don't dominate mainstream chips at gaming goes to show that quad-channel isn't all that relevant to the client desktop segment. With the 5950X, you could get yourself HEDT-kind multi-core muscle, higher memory clock headroom to make up the bandwidth deficit, and a more affordable platform since the 5950X is compatible with even mainstream chipsets, such as the AMD B550.

The "Zen 3" microarchitecture introduces a massive 19% IPC uplift over "Zen 2," which already changed the desktop processor market in a big way. Higher IPC means higher single-threaded performance, which conversely means improved gaming performance, with AMD claiming the Ryzen 9 5000-series as having beaten the fastest Intel Core i9 "Comet Lake" part at gaming. Productivity performance should naturally be higher since you have 60% more of these faster cores than the i9-10900K.



The AMD Ryzen 5 5950X in this review uses the "Zen 3" architecture, which is a combination of micro and macro changes to the "Zen" architecture. At a macro level, we see AMD practically doing away with the 4-core CCX design, resulting in each of the two 7 nm "Zen 3" chiplets having a monolithic group of eight cores sharing a large 32 MB L3 cache. At a micro-level, AMD has invested heavily in improving the various components inside the core, resulting in that sweet 19% IPC gain. Together, the higher IPC cores and improved multi-core topology should put the 5950X on firmer ground against not just Intel's LGA1200 "Comet Lake" parts, but also its Core X "Cascade Lake-X" parts that go up to 18 cores.

AMD is launching the Ryzen 9 5950X at $799, making it the priciest mainstream desktop processor, which is right up there with HEDT parts. Since this is a Socket AM4 part that doesn't temper down its clock speeds to afford such a large core count, AMD claims that the 5950X will give you the best of both worlds: leadership AAA gaming performance and productivity that can potentially save you hundreds of dollars compared to an HEDT. In this review, we test the Ryzen 9 5950X against a large selection of processors.

AMD Ryzen 9 5950X Market Segment Analysis
 PriceCores /
Threads
Base
Clock
Max.
Boost
L3
Cache
TDPArchitectureProcessSocket
Ryzen 7 1800X$2508 / 163.6 GHz4.0 GHz16 MB95 WZen14 nmAM4
Core i7-8700K$3806 / 123.7 GHz4.7 GHz12 MB95 WCoffee Lake14 nmLGA 1151
Core i7-9700K$3808 / 83.6 GHz4.9 GHz12 MB95 WCoffee Lake14 nmLGA 1151
Core i7-10700K$3808 / 163.8 GHz5.1 GHz16 MB125 WComet Lake14 nmLGA 1200
Ryzen 7 3700X$3258 / 163.6 GHz4.4 GHz32 MB65 WZen 27 nmAM4
Ryzen 7 3800X$3408 / 163.9 GHz4.5 GHz32 MB105 WZen 27 nmAM4
Ryzen 7 3800XT$3808 / 163.9 GHz4.7 GHz32 MB105 WZen 27 nmAM4
Ryzen 7 5800X$4508 / 163.8 GHz4.7 GHz32 MB105 WZen 37 nmAM4
Core i9-10900$50010 / 202.8 GHz5.2 GHz20 MB65 WComet Lake14 nmLGA 1200
Ryzen 9 3900X$46012 / 243.8 GHz4.6 GHz64 MB105 WZen 27 nmAM4
Ryzen 9 3900XT$47012 / 243.8 GHz4.7 GHz64 MB105 WZen 27 nmAM4
Ryzen 9 5900X$55012 / 243.7 GHz4.8 GHz64 MB105 WZen 37 nmAM4
Core i9-9900K$3908 / 163.6 GHz5.0 GHz16 MB95 WCoffee Lake14 nmLGA 1151
Core i9-9900KS$8008 / 164.0 GHz5.0 GHz16 MB127 WCoffee Lake14 nmLGA 1151
Core i9-10900K$55010 / 203.7 GHz5.3 GHz20 MB125 WComet Lake14 nmLGA 1200
Ryzen 9 3950X$72016 / 323.5 GHz4.7 GHz64 MB105 WZen 27 nmAM4
Ryzen 9 5950X$80016 / 323.4 GHz4.9 GHz64 MB105 WZen 37 nmAM4
Next Page »Unboxing & Photos
View as single page