Monday, March 28th 2016

Akasa Unveils Plato X6 and Newton X6 Cases for "Skylake" NUC

Akasa announced its Newton X6 and Plato X6 line of premium fan-less NUC cases, which are compatible with Intel's latest Core "Skylake" NUC system boards. The two cases stay fan-less, and yet keep the 45W-ish TDP machine (Core "Skylake" CPU + PCH) cool, as their anodized aluminium bodies double up as heatsinks. The two cases feature slate-colored, brushed aluminium textures, with diamond-cut edges.

The Plato X6 measures 240 mm x 247 mm x 38.5 mm; features a mostly flat top and bottom surface, with passive heat dissipation happening at two vertically ridged sides. This case has room for a 9.5 mm-thick 2.5-inch drive, two USB 3.0 front-panel ports (standard header), and an IR receiver. The Newton X6, on the other hand, features more conventional 200 mm x 176 mm x 53.5 mm dimensions, with the sides and top of the case being ridged for heat dissipation. It's got the same feature-set as the Plato X6.
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5 Comments on Akasa Unveils Plato X6 and Newton X6 Cases for "Skylake" NUC

#1
Caring1
Not really a new product, just a modified version of what they already sell, to accommodate the newer platform.
I like the look of the previous model with two drive bays accessible from the front.
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#2
AsRock
TPU addict
Caring1 said:
Not really a new product, just a modified version of what they already sell, to accommodate the newer platform.
I like the look of the previous model with two drive bays accessible from the front.
That's some thing that a lot of company's should practice, If it works why change it.
Posted on Reply
#3
Dragonsmonk
AsRock said:
That's some thing that a lot of company's should practice, If it works why change it.
As that is how new, maybe even better, products are developed?

Also - why do those press releases never include any prices? Companies should learn to put at least a MSRP in there.
Posted on Reply
#4
AsRock
TPU addict
Rarly that's the case, a new product is normally made to make a sale of goods not because it's improved, and even when it is improved it's questionable a lot of times.
Posted on Reply
#5
Dragonsmonk
AsRock said:
Rarly that's the case, a new product is normally made to make a sale of goods not because it's improved, and even when it is improved it's questionable a lot of times.
Oh I completely agree with that, but same as for "never change a running system", it is only through change and trial and error (as that is what most developments are) that things even have a chance of getting improved.
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