Tuesday, March 7th 2017

Pioneer Unveils the BDR-211UBK Blu-ray XL Writer

Pioneer Electronics (USA) Inc. today unveiled its new internal BD/DVD/CD writer, the BDR-211UBK. The new model supports Ultra HD Blu-ray1 playback using bundled CyberLink PowerDVD14 software. The market for 4K resolution is expected to expand significantly as demand increases for definition higher than full HD. The BDR-211UBK meets that need, enabling PC users to enjoy 4K content via a PC, as well as providing up to 16x² maximum BD-R writing speed (BD-R: SL 25GB) and the ability to read and write a variety of BD (SL 25GB/DL 50GB) and BDXL (BD-R XL: TL 100GB/ QL 128GB, BD-RE XL: TL 100GB) discs.
Features Include:
  • Ultra HD Blu-ray playback - the BDR-211UBK supports Ultra HD Blu-ray playback using the bundled CyberLink software. Ultra HD Blu-ray includes content up to 4K resolution (3840 pixels horizontal×2160pixels vertical) and a wider range of colors compared to full HD.
  • Faster burning - Up to 16x² maximum write speed on BD-R single-layer discs, 14x on BD-R DL discs and 8x on BD-R triple-layer discs.
  • Compatible with Windows 10 - The BDR-211UBK and bundled software are compatible with the latest Windows OS, Windows 10.
  • Region Code Change - BDR-211UBK has DVD regional playback control. It allows users to set the region of the drive up to five times.
Other features:
  • Store more data - Support for BDXL media, which stores up to 156% more data than 50GB Dual Layer Blu-ray Disc, including 100GB Triple Layer (TL)³ and 128GB Quadruple Layer (QL)³ discs.
  • QuickPlay - BD-ROM and DVD-ROM discs are ready quickly after insertion.
  • PowerRead - Through its PowerRead feature, the BDR-211UBK provides smoother movie playback when a disc is marked with fingerprints or has minor surface scratches. When the drive is not able to read through these obstructed areas of a disc, it will quickly move forward to the next available data point, resulting in smoother Blu-ray and DVD movie playback.4
  • Auto Quiet Mode - The drive monitors how it is being used and will adjust its disc rotation speed automatically, using a quieter mode (slower speed) when watching Blu-ray and DVD titles or listening to conventional audio CDs.
  • PureRead3 - Clicking or popping sounds that might normally occur due to minor scratches and fingerprints on CDs can be prevented on some discs with the drive's PureRead3 technology, which allows the drive to adjust its optical playback settings dynamically through the use of a unique algorithm.5
  • Peak power Reducer - This power saving mode enables the drive to suppress power consumption at peak operation. It keeps stable operation in case of a drop in power supply.
The Pioneer BDR-211UBK will be available in late March with a suggested retail price of $129.99.
Add your own comment

29 Comments on Pioneer Unveils the BDR-211UBK Blu-ray XL Writer

#1
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
im on 209s, might drop one of these in for my Ryzen Rig and give the 209 to the misses
Posted on Reply
#2
bubbly1724
4K Blu-ray playback? So does this require Kaby Lake or something? And $130 is awfully low for a 4K BD player.
Posted on Reply
#4
RejZoR
People still use optical drives? The only reason I have my DVD-RW unit in my PC is because I still have few games on CD's that are not available on Steam or GOG. And that's really THE ONLY reason. For data transfers, USB drives cost peanuts at 128GB these days (compared to this drive alone). USB 3.0 version.
Posted on Reply
#5
Readlight
I hate Pioneer becouse of dead home cinema because of flash drive hooked you can not even use parts inside. Fuck them.
Posted on Reply
#6
SetsunaFZero
RejZoR said:
People still use optical drives? The only reason I have my DVD-RW unit in my PC is because I still have few games on CD's that are not available on Steam or GOG. And that's really THE ONLY reason. For data transfers, USB drives cost peanuts at 128GB these days (compared to this drive alone). USB 3.0 version.
Because you use it doesn't mean everyone is using it. I have a DVD-RW drive in my case but most of the time it's disconnected. My GF on the other end buys almost everything on Disc.

One BD-DL Disc in Production costs around 80 Euro-cent including profit, with out Booklet(s), Inlay-sheet, Case and Distribution. This is the price from a premium Disc manufacture in Austria.
Posted on Reply
#7
TheLostSwede
Discs are dead as far as I'm concerned. It's 6-7 years since I last had an optical drive in computer. Nothing more frustrating than going to a tradeshow and getting a product catalogue on a mini CD...
Posted on Reply
#8
londiste
syrup said:
Yes, Kaby Lake and Windows 10 required for Ultra HD Blu-ray, presumably due to DRM requirements.
basically, what the actual fuck?
are absolutely everyone involved in disks actively trying to make them obsolete or what?

the worst kind of drm. there really should not be a technical requirement for this. yeah, you'll need a high-end cpu (or a gpu with hw decoder) to actually play uhd blu-ray video, but just limiting the thing to some esoteric set of devices in beyond stupid.
Posted on Reply
#9
tigger
I'm the only one
Or you could just buy a BD player and play them on your TV.

My case doesn't rven have a drive bay to put one of these fossils in.
Posted on Reply
#11
SetsunaFZero
tigger said:
Ridiculous needing a Kaby for it, what about the people who have a high end Skylake
FileName_4K_BD-Rip_5.1_ACC_TeamWhatever :laugh:
Posted on Reply
#12
Gundem
londiste said:
basically, what the actual fuck?
are absolutely everyone involved in disks actively trying to make them obsolete or what?

the worst kind of drm. there really should not be a technical requirement for this. yeah, you'll need a high-end cpu (or a gpu with hw decoder) to actually play uhd blu-ray video, but just limiting the thing to some esoteric set of devices in beyond stupid.
I agree
Posted on Reply
#14
WaroDaBeast
I have the 207D myself and I quite like it. It's relatively silent and Pioneer offers firmware updates from time to time.

About the restrictions concerning UHD Blu-rays, I'm sure VLC will let us do away with those, although that'll take some time.
Posted on Reply
#15
Beastie
They should realise that restrictive DRM which only inconveniences their law abiding, paying customers will only encourage piracy.

If they had half a brain between them they would see they need a model that benefits the paying customer in some way at the same time as enforcing DRM. Otherwise it is just counter productive.
Posted on Reply
#16
xkche
I don't know why need KabyLake?. if I've a dedicated GPU can it works rigth?.

Stupid tecnology.
Posted on Reply
#17
TheDeeGee
People still use ancient optical drives?
Posted on Reply
#18
xkche
TheDeeGee said:
People still use ancient optical drives?
No and yes.

Not everyone have fast internet connection to see movies online in HD or UHD.

In my situation, just have 4MB (768kbps up) ADSL. Even HD it's hard to see.
Posted on Reply
#19
revin
I still use BD DL burning for archiving and moving large data to and fro.
This look really nice till that came up about the CPU
Hope that they get better than this DRM crap, not changing a very capable CPU just to watch a 4K movie on a 2K pc if I cant stream it to the TV
Posted on Reply
#20
wiyosaya
RejZoR said:
People still use optical drives? The only reason I have my DVD-RW unit in my PC is because I still have few games on CD's that are not available on Steam or GOG. And that's really THE ONLY reason. For data transfers, USB drives cost peanuts at 128GB these days (compared to this drive alone). USB 3.0 version.
For high-resolution video, optical media still provides the best image quality. Streaming, no matter what the resolution, is compressed and loses detail. I have a 209 in my HTPC, and use that for BR playback. Everything related to the experience is significantly better, IMO.
Posted on Reply
#21
ensabrenoir
Optical media....Like disco and bell bottoms....Will never die....The the future is ancient tech boys !!!!!! (Man I gotta be sleepy or something)
Posted on Reply
#22
Blueberries
The disc really is dying, everyone streams these days, and even my parent's i3 can stream 4k@60fps. I guess the concept is cool but digital copies are easier and faster, they could just put blu-ray images on SDCards.
Posted on Reply
#23
Blueberries
wiyosaya said:
For high-resolution video, optical media still provides the best image quality. Streaming, no matter what the resolution, is compressed and loses detail. I have a 209 in my HTPC, and use that for BR playback. Everything related to the experience is significantly better, IMO.
This is a myth. People said the same thing about audio on CDs.
Posted on Reply
#24
bubbly1724
Blueberries said:
This is a myth. People said the same thing about audio on CDs.
Myth? You better provide some sources there. 4K-BD goes from 50GB per disc to 100GB (at least 100Mbps bitrate). Bitrate is generally many times higher than anything you get streaming or re-encoded rips. Netflix's standard 4K bitrate is 15.6Mbps, while HDR stream is 18Mbps (Netflix only recommends 25Mbps for 4K streaming). Don't know about Amazon's 4K since they don't provide numbers.
Posted on Reply
#25
Disparia
Just the other day I ripped an 10-album discography picked up for $9 in the wrap. My optical also reads DVD and BD on a regular basis, so I still have a need for one.

Not upgrading to any UHD compatible drive though... they can wait.
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment