Friday, March 24th 2017

Microsoft Lifts "Spying" Components in Windows 10 for Chinese Government Version

Reports have started coming in that Microsoft has finalized its special, "non-spying" edition of Windows 10 for the Chinese government. In a joint-venture with China's own CTEC (China Electronics Technology Group), the Redmond-based company has apparently managed to deliver what they themselves thought impossible: a version of their operating system that doesn't spy on its users.

China's government previously banned Windows 8 and its derivatives, citing security concerns, and later launched an anti-monopoly probe against Microsoft. This meant that Microsoft was largely left out of China's huge state-backed enterprises in China - and one can imagine how lucrative a market this one is. Microsoft surely wouldn't be willing to allow such a chance of revenue to just jostle over to the Linux field, following the Chinese government's attempts to craft a custom OS (Kylin, which failed) and recent efforts with new NeoKylin initiative. Microsoft isn't willing to relent so as to what and how were features cut from their Windows 10 version that leads it to continue normal functions even without the heavily baked-in, essential, flaunted telemetry features. What is true, though, is that the company did say telemetry and data collection was so deeply embedded on their operating system that removing them would break it at a fundamental level which is, apparently, only the case if you don't have the money (or potential revenue) to pony up for a custom edition.
Source: The Verge
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35 Comments on Microsoft Lifts "Spying" Components in Windows 10 for Chinese Government Version

#1
Jack1n
I hope this will become one more thing that China exports.
Posted on Reply
#2
alucasa
I am 99.9% sure it will still spy but to Chinese government instead of you-know-whom.
Posted on Reply
#3
ssdpro
I really doubt the gov't here in the States is going to put any pressure on MS for their own interests or citizens. What is even the point now? The US Senate just OK'd your ISP collecting anything they want and selling it without your permission or knowledge. If the car has already hit the tree what is the point of getting an oil change?

People upset about MS need to chill out. If you don't like it, slide the little bar left. Slide that bar left with as much emotion as you feel necessary. Two years ago I typed "I buy poop for $5000" into Windows 10. So far not one company or person has contacted me to sell me said poop.
Posted on Reply
#4
TheinsanegamerN
"What is true, though, is that the company did say telemetry and data collection was so deeply embedded on their operating system that removing them would break it at a fundamental level which is, apparently, only the case if you don't have the money (or potential revenue) to pony up for a custom edition."

MS really was trying to blow smoke up everyone's hind ends there, wern't they? An OS that cant survive without telemetry is like saying a car cant run without an air conditioner.
Posted on Reply
#5
TheMailMan78
Big Member
TheinsanegamerN, post: 3625880, member: 127292"
An OS that cant survive without telemetry is like saying a car cant run without an air conditioner.
Ever live in Florida?
Posted on Reply
#6
Brusfantomet
ssdpro, post: 3625874, member: 131037"
I really doubt the gov't here in the States is going to put any pressure on MS for their own interests or citizens. What is even the point now? The US Senate just OK'd your ISP collecting anything they want and selling it without your permission or knowledge. If the car has already hit the tree what is the point of getting an oil change?

People upset about MS need to chill out. If you don't like it, slide the little bar left. Slide that bar left with as much emotion as you feel necessary. Two years ago I typed "I buy poop for $5000" into Windows 10. So far not one company or person has contacted me to sell me said poop.
Well, for the 6 billion not currently in china or the US this is interesting, as some of the countries out there actually has laws protecting their privacy.
Posted on Reply
#7
Shihabyooo
"Joint-venture" as in the Chinese supplied their requirements and MS complied, or that the former had their hand inside the source code?
Still waiting for the EU to stop tearing itself apart and make MS bake out a "non-spying" Windows 10 N.


TheinsanegamerN, post: 3625880, member: 127292"
MS really was trying to blow smoke up everyone's hind ends there, wern't they? An OS that cant survive without telemetry is like saying a car cant run without an air conditioner.
As an engineer, I have to admit that I sympathize with Microsoft on the the necessity of data on making and maintaining a well performing system. I completely oppose their forceful approach with it (that is, not having an opt-out option for non-enterprise users. I can rationalize it being on by default though), and I wouldn't say that it is impossible to work without it, but I wouldn't even dream about saying that it wouldn't make a nigh and day difference in the product!
Posted on Reply
#8
TheMailMan78
Big Member
You guys thinking you have privacy are cute. Thinking "laws" protect you from spying. The SECOND you connect to the internet you are in fact an open window. Hell the second you turn on most phones, tablets or computers with ANY kind of wifi/cellular connections you're F#$KED. When you TALK on a landline you're being recorded. You are DUMB AS F@#K to think otherwise.
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#9
pigulici
So this will spy for China gov, not for USA gov, another good thing maket it to do bad things, because of greed...
Posted on Reply
#10
ironwolf
TheMailMan78, post: 3625884, member: 39776"
Ever live in Florida?
As a native Floridian, I approve of this 100%. No AC around here in the summer = :nutkick:
Posted on Reply
#11
ssdpro
Brusfantomet, post: 3625896, member: 104119"
Well, for the 6 billion not currently in china or the US this is interesting, as some of the countries out there actually has laws protecting their privacy.
Right... and everyone outside the US is virtuous and obeys all laws with strict ethics. That is why only the USA has prisons and the rest of the world is so stable. Keep telling yourself the laws protect you.
Posted on Reply
#12
Totally
TheMailMan78, post: 3625884, member: 39776"
Ever live in Florida?
It's not that bad, it can get warm some times but no AC just really sucks at the worst. You can't even cook food on your dash like in Arizona/Nevada.
Posted on Reply
#13
Basard
One more reason to move to China.... lol...
Posted on Reply
#14
TheMailMan78
Big Member
Totally, post: 3625951, member: 90126"
It's not that bad, it can get warm some times but no AC just really sucks at the worst. You can't even cook food on your dash like in Arizona/Nevada.
Yeah I don't think you are from Florida.
Posted on Reply
#15
dj-electric
Microsoft only cleared room for the Chinese gov. Abyone who thinks this is spyware free is a little naive
Posted on Reply
#16
TheMailMan78
Big Member
ironwolf, post: 3625925, member: 94359"
As a native Floridian, I approve of this 100%. No AC around here in the summer = :nutkick:
Homestead here. If you know Florida you know Homestead.
Posted on Reply
#17
Totally
TheMailMan78, post: 3626027, member: 39776"
Yeah I don't think you are from Florida.
I'm a Palm Beacher, i.e. Northern Cuba. You guys up North and the rest of the country might disown us down here but it's still Florida. I'm sorry after spending a year in Ariz, I can say that we have no claim to heat that shit is scary. I'm sorry, I'll take high 90s with a high index vs low index 100+ any day after experiencing it firsthand.
Posted on Reply
#18
Jism
So,

Chinese goverment, basicly succeeds into delivery of an OS that does not collect or gather personal / private data or usage statistics...

Why the hell do WE have such a weak goverment that both EU and US are not able to demand the very same. We consumers accept it all.... free comes with a f'ing price.
Posted on Reply
#19
Prima.Vera
So EU cannot impose this kind of restrictions too?? Lazy b-terds
Posted on Reply
#20
Melvis
Can I get that version please? lol
Posted on Reply
#21
Ahhzz
Melvis, post: 3626364, member: 50520"
Can I get that version please? lol
I did with Windows 7. Windows Ult KN
Posted on Reply
#22
Caring1
I wonder if they are still stuck with Bing?
Posted on Reply
#23
Prima.Vera
Caring1, post: 3626874, member: 153156"
I wonder if they are still stuck with Bing?
Most likely they will use Baidu, which is actually better than Bing.
And besides Baidu is the BigBrother of the Chinese Gov. So is a win-win. ;)
Posted on Reply
#24
EarthDog
Ahh, part two in a one part feature...

Was wondering this when the first artiest came up, what exactly it was...
Posted on Reply
#25
evernessince
Shihabyooo, post: 3625897, member: 91709"
"Joint-venture" as in the Chinese supplied their requirements and MS complied, or that the former had their hand inside the source code?
Still waiting for the EU to stop tearing itself apart and make MS bake out a "non-spying" Windows 10 N.




As an engineer, I have to admit that I sympathize with Microsoft on the the necessity of data on making and maintaining a well performing system. I completely oppose their forceful approach with it (that is, not having an opt-out option for non-enterprise users. I can rationalize it being on by default though), and I wouldn't say that it is impossible to work without it, but I wouldn't even dream about saying that it wouldn't make a nigh and day difference in the product!
See, almost everyone is fine with the data collected that involves system performance, crashes, ect. I can completely understand collecting data to improve the OS. What people are mad about is the seemingly senseless data collection that does not go towards improving the OS. At the very least, if microsoft wants to collect data, they should make a privacy center where it shows you exactly what data has been collected. Like literally a log with [date][Service that collected the data][Name][Purpose] as the entry name. Heck, they could even make a right click option "don't send this kind of data" if they wanted to. Recording small bits into a .txt or .xml log file wouldn't really increase overhead either.
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