Thursday, May 18th 2017

Western Digital Introduces 10 TB RED, RED PRO HDDs

Western Digital has introduced new models to its RED and RED PRO line-up of HDDs. The RED series is oriented more towards a NAS environment, though nothing is really stopping you from putting on of these into your system. These use the same HelioSeal technology that WD uses on their enterprise-class drives, which allows the company to increase the capacity of the RED and RED PRO drives by 25%.

The normal RED drive is built for systems with up to 8 drive bays, while the RED PRO is built for systems with up to 16 drive bays. The RED series is more silent, with an internal spindle speed of 5400RPM, while the RED PRO series comes with a 7200RPM speed. This means the PRO series is louder while operating, but also that is has better performance and faster data access times.
WD RED & RED PRO 10TB Feature Highlights
  • HelioSeal: Bringing Western Digital's fourth generation, exclusive HelioSeal technology in 10TB capacity to the NAS storage market.
  • 3D Active Balance Plus, an enhanced balance control technology that improves overall drive performance and reliability.
  • Seamless integration with Western Digital's My Cloud Pro Series NAS and My Cloud Expert Series NAS systems. These systems are designed specifically for the creative community. They enable a seamless transfer of content between devices in any location, whether users are shooting remotely or editing at home.
  • NASware 3.0 is the latest version of WD's original NASware technology. It is designed to improve reliability and system performance, reduce customer downtime, and to simplify the integration process.
  • Optimized performance class - 5400 RPM class for SOHO environments, 7200 RPM class for up to 16 bay NAS systems

Pricing and Availability

The new WD RED and WD RED PRO 10 TB hard drives are available now. The WD RED 10TB feature a three-year limited warranty and a $494.00 USD MSRP, while the WD RED PRO 10 TB expand both those details to a five-year limited warranty and a $533.00 USD MSRP.Source: ETeknix
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15 Comments on Western Digital Introduces 10 TB RED, RED PRO HDDs

#1
P4-630
The Way It's Meant to be Played
Well if I would need one and spending this kind of cash I might as well go for the PRO for the 5 year warranty....
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#2
TheLostSwede
P4-630 said:
Well if I would need one and spending this kind of cash I might as well go for the PRO for the 5 year warranty....
One? These are NAS hard drives, you'd buy at least a matching pair, if not four or five...
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#3
Jizzler
Cool. My WD boycott has expired and I need more space. Probably looking at the 6TB Pro which seems to be the best $/TB at this moment, though the $460 street price of the 10TB Pro is very close. A good option if density is a factor. Something I'd consider at work, but I'm just talking about my home server.
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#4
DeathtoGnomes
"Not the RED one!"

years ago we used to refer to buying storage in MB/$ now, its TB/$, cant wait for the next step.
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#5
Octavean
I had standardized on WD Red 4TB HDDs for some time. I wanted to move to WD Red 8TB drives but they weren't cost effective enough IMO at the time. I only started buying WD Red 8TB drives when the cost of two 4TB drives were roughly equal to or less then a single 8TB.

Therefore for the WD Red 10TB drives to meet my price / performance metrics 4x 8TB drives (32TB) should be roughly the same cost as 3x 10TB drives (30TB). Prices naturally vary depending on vendor.

WD Red 4TB = ~$140
WD Red 8TB = ~$280
WD Red 10TB = ~$494
HGST 12TB = ~$1250

The calculation comes out as follows:

4x 8TB = 4x $280 = $1120
3x 10TB = 3x $494 = $1482

If I can buy three 10TB WD Red drives for about ~$1120 or less it would be worth it to me. So that would be about ~$373 USD per drive.

For now I am content to stick with my 8x 8TB (64TB) configuration.

Lets not even talk about the 12TB drives. There is no way I would spend $1250 USD for a single 12TB drive. I'd love to have 12TB HDDs but they are asking prices that only enterprise organizations are willing to pay.
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#6
ERazer
Could use 4 of those 4TB to replace my NAS drives :D
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#7
Fx
Sweeet!

I've been waiting for this! I love my WD Reds. I already have a 10TB Gold, but the Reds strike the perfect balance for storage, cost and reliability.
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#8
djisas
Been thinking on buying a 4TB red, how are they compared to competition these days?
Posted on Reply
#9
Fx
djisas said:
Been thinking on buying a 4TB red, how are they compared to competition these days?
They are not fast drives, but they are easy on the pocket book, quiet and very reliable. 3 year warranty but chances are it will at least make it to 5.
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#10
djisas
Fx said:
They are not fast drives, but they are easy on the pocket book, quiet and very reliable. 3 year warranty but chances are it will at least make it to 5.
Well on my system there's currently 4HDD plus 1ssd, this will be just a storage drive and im looking for reliability above all, i still, remember the days of seagate 7200.11, all my made in china ones failed...
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#11
Fx
djisas said:
Well on my system there's currently 4HDD plus 1ssd, this will be just a storage drive and im looking for reliability above all, i still, remember the days of seagate 7200.11, all my made in china ones failed...
I have over 30 WD Reds ranging from 6-8TB, and I haven't seen any issue with 4TBs. The oldest ones are going on 2.5 years now; not a single SMART error on any of them.

How many drive bays do you have left? Are you looking to consolidate any data onto a new drive? You might want to consider a 8TB if you are constrained; it is cheaper per TB than the 4TB by a little bit. It depends on your use case though.
Posted on Reply
#12
djisas
Fx said:
I have over 30 WD Reds ranging from 6-8TB, and I haven't seen any issue with 4TBs. The oldest ones are going on 2.5 years now; not a single SMART error on any of them.

How many drive bays do you have left? Are you looking to consolidate any data onto a new drive? You might want to consider a 8TB if you are constrained; it is cheaper per TB than the 4TB by a little bit. It depends on your use case though.
4TB will last me for a while, got 1 free drive but one 500Gb and 1Tb drive got to go...
I have a wd 640Gb black going for over 5-6 years and 1 1TB going for another 4-5 years no smart errors either, unlike the seagate drives i had...
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#13
Fx
djisas said:
4TB will last me for a while, got 1 free drive but one 500Gb and 1Tb drive got to go...
I have a wd 640Gb black going for over 5-6 years and 1 1TB going for another 4-5 years no smart errors either, unlike the seagate drives i had...
I also have three 4TB Blacks going strong since they came out. I have those set up in a Stablebit Pool still running like a workhorse. My only usage of Seagate has been whatever my work environment has had; I have never once bought Seagate. No need to when WD provides the assurance and peace of mind that I require.
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#14
JunkBear
I would like to meet the first crazy dude who will fill it up with porn.
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#15
Octavean
I have had a few WD Red drives fail. A couple of 2TB, one 4TB and I think two 3TB models failed within warranty. The WD RMA process is simple and painless though. If anyone is concerned with the 3yr warranty being too short then stepping up to the Red pro would be advisable but you'll pay extra for the 5yr. The other benefit is that you can presumably use more then 8x drives in an array with the pro whereas the standard Red drives are not to exceed 8.

I have approximately upwards of 25 WD Red drives.

I first populated a Synology DS1815+ NAS with 8x 4TB WD Red drives (Synology Hybrid RAID 2 disc redundancy). I then gradually replaced them with 8x 8TB WD Red drives. The WD Red 4TB drives then went into a DIY 12 bay NAS with the exception of two that I am using in a DAS. There are also about 8x 3TB WD Red drives in my 12 bay Server running Microsoft Server 2012 Essentials. I have a couple 2TB WD Red drives too.

Typically I don't install HDD in any of my systems, which are all SSD only.
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