Friday, June 23rd 2017

WannaCry Strikes Again: Attack Forces Honda Factory to Shutdown

If you thought WannaCry was done, it would appear you were wrong. Honda has appeared as the latest victim of the outbreak, as late as this week. The outbreak was bad enough to stop production at its Sayama plant northeast of Tokyo. That factory can churn out nearly 1,000 vehicles a day, by the way, so this is not a small amount of money lost for the company.

The company says it discovered the malware Sunday, and by Wednesday it had managed to spread to several regions including Japan, North America, Europe, China and other locations (Sayama was the only place to experience an actual shutdown of operations, however).
The outbreak was "solved" by this Tuesday, though there is no word on whether that solution involved paying the ransom or not. This is especially frustrating for Honda as their IT department had reportedly taken precautions against the worm only to be struck anyhow. The delivery method used for the WannaCry ransomware is unknown at this time, and one could theorize it may be a new variant, but that would be only theory at this point since there is unfortunately little technical information forthcoming in the source article. Source: Reuters.com
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21 Comments on WannaCry Strikes Again: Attack Forces Honda Factory to Shutdown

#1
Chaitanya
Considering how badly Honda is doing in F1 and MotoGP that ransomware attack might not be the worst thing to happen to them.
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#3
R-T-B
Cybrnook2002, post: 3682087, member: 44647"
Where is Tokoyo? :)
Somewhere in the land of extra "o's." Fixed.
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#4
RejZoR
I wonder how they had their systems protected. I bet they had no security software. But you know, all that stuff is obsolete and unnecessary...
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#5
R-T-B
RejZoR, post: 3682164, member: 1515"
I wonder how they had their systems protected. I bet they had no security software. But you know, all that stuff is obsolete and unnecessary...
I'm actually more willing to bet they had "McAfee" and assumed because of that, system updates weren't neccesary. Seen it way too many times.
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#6
Octavean
Can't rule out the possibility of a disgruntled worker,.....
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#7
Mussels
Moderprator
according to a badly worded press release, all the speed and red light cameras around my city were infected with wannacry as well.

virus did some good!
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#8
Prima.Vera
Let me guess. Still running on Windows XP machines. - unpatched.
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#9
ozkisses
Prima.Vera, post: 3682330, member: 98685"
Let me guess. Still running on Windows XP machines. - unpatched.
:laugh: I needed that lol
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#10
Caring1
Mussels, post: 3682309, member: 1746"
according to a badly worded press release, all the speed and red light cameras around my city were infected with wannacry as well.

virus did some good!
I just read about that, apparently a maintenance worker "inadvertantly" uploaded it via a USB while doing maintenance.
I guess that means he got caught and now can't collect.
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#11
FPSPusher
This huge corporation didn't have a backup, fire the fucking IT's now!
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#12
Prima.Vera
FPSPusher, post: 3682529, member: 170598"
This huge corporation didn't have a backup, fire the fucking IT's now!
Maybe it encrypted the ... encrypted backup also?? :)
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#13
Steevo
While I understand their IT department has a chain of command probably headed by someone with a degree in IT, it's most likely they were more concerned with uptime and ignored protocols that should be in place, like quarantining any machine with the infection, and having redundancy and quickly redeployable backups, cause you know. Money.


So I don't feel bad for them at all.
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#14
ozkisses
FPSPusher, post: 3682529, member: 170598"
This huge corporation didn't have a backup, fire the fucking IT's now!
Agreed, especially when reports say 200,000 systems in 150 countries were affected by wannacry in a short period of time. Why would any corporation/company think they are immune?
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#15
Rivage
Cybrnook2002, post: 3682087, member: 44647"
Where is Tokoyo? :)
Somewhere near the Moonland continent. But this is not accurate.
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#16
trog100
i am beginning to wonder if all this "interconectively" is possible to make secure.. somehow i have feeling it isnt.. :)

trog
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#17
Aximous
Prima.Vera, post: 3682330, member: 98685"
Let me guess. Still running on Windows XP machines. - unpatched.
"Almost all victims of the cyberattack were running Windows 7, prompting a security researcher to
argue that its effects on Windows XP users were "insignificant" in comparison."

So, no. Xp is not the culprit here.
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#18
Mescalamba
Octavean, post: 3682188, member: 52351"
Can't rule out the possibility of a disgruntled worker,.....
Most likely, usually weakest link in any kind of anti-hack system is people. Those who are really good in social engineering actually rarely use regular ways of deploying hacks (malwares, trojans etc.). Direct approach if possible via living "trojan horse" is way better when its possible. Also it usually bypasses any kind of defense.
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#19
P4-630
Just seen in the news, a lot of hospitals still using XP it seems ..... o_Oo_O
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#20
Steevo
P4-630, post: 3682985, member: 22154"
Just seen in the news, a lot of hospitals still using XP it seems ..... o_Oo_O
A lot of hospitals are using XP as they are running AS/400 or I-Series IBM servers for POS and inventory and the interface just works so much better on XP than anything since. The alternate IBM has given is a shitty Java based interface that is about 4X slower than the native 3270 emulation software.
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#21
remixedcat
stop opening attatchements from emails and adopt better network policies
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