Wednesday, July 5th 2017

EK Water Blocks Intros M.2 NGFF SSD Heatsink

EK Water Blocks, the Slovenia-based premium computer liquid cooling gear manufacturer, is releasing a passive heatsink for M.2 NVMe Next Generation Form Factor SSDs. Although it's not a water cooling part, it is a much needed aesthetical and functional heatsink for many PC owners. It is not a secret that M.2 NVMe SSDs can overheat very easily and be subdued to thermal throttling, thus losing performance. The heatsink brings 8-11°C improvement in SSDs temperatures, or even more with sufficient air flow.

The unique design of the heatsink ensures that it is easy to install, it is low profile, easily reusable and aesthetically not intrusive. Simple clips ensure that the heatsink is very easy to install and to re-use if the SSDs is upgraded. Ribbed heatsink acts as a very effective passive cooler as well as aesthetic cover. Its simple design ensures a sleek, non-intrusive look that can be easily combined with any aesthetical requirement of the user. The compact design makes it highly compatible so that it does not interfere with other components. EK Water Blocks are offering the new EK-M.2 NVMe Heatsink in black and nickel variants.
Compatibility
The EK-M.2 NVMe Heatsink is compatible with all single sided type 2280 M.2 NVMe SSDs (22mm wide, 80mm long). Because the heatsink consists of a front and backplate as well, the compatibility is limited to M.2 (NGFF) connectors of 4.2mm height.

The EK-M.2 NVMe Heatsinks are made in Slovenia, Europe and is readily available for purchase through EK Webshop and Partner Reseller Network. In the table below you can see manufacturer suggested retail price (MSRP) with VAT included.
  • EK-M.2 NVMe Heatsink - Nickel: 12.94€
  • EK-M.2 NVMe Heatsink - Black: 9.96€
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13 Comments on EK Water Blocks Intros M.2 NGFF SSD Heatsink

#1
Fx
Nice. It looks sleek, simple and effective.
Posted on Reply
#2
Hood
No red option, no RGB, no water cooling fittings - thank you, EK, for this sensible approach to a minor problem.
Posted on Reply
#3
bonehead123
whah da frick, how dare you EK, to release ANY pc component without a boatload of glaring RGB LED's....

surely the peecee weeny tweeny gods will now banish you forever from what used to be your solid hold on a respectable position in the industry....

damn you, all your factories shall now go up in flames for this pitiful attempt at marketing bigotry......
Posted on Reply
#4
jaw shwaa
Aw man , it's right there and they missed it, why not make cooling for that cmos battery? Just an ek logo instead of a battery..
Posted on Reply
#5
Th3pwn3r
"Fx said:
Nice. It looks sleek, simple and effective.
Excuse my ignorance but is it really effective? I didn't even think these things created any significant heat.

"jaw shwaa said:
Aw man , it's right there and they missed it, why not make cooling for that cmos battery? Just an ek logo instead of a battery..
Shhh, I'm going to patent that ha.
Posted on Reply
#6
bonehead123
"Th3pwn3r said:
Shhh, I'm going to patent that ha.
beat you to it, by about 27 years man :D

How, you may ask yourself....

Well I saw these things being developed in 1987, when I looked into my crystal future balls collection, and promptly invested ~$15 in the factory that would be making them. SO, now that they have finally been introduced to the public, I am a friggin gazillionaire !!!!!!!!!!!
Posted on Reply
#7
jaw shwaa
"bonehead123 said:
beat you to it, by about 27 years man :D

How, you may ask yourself....

Well I saw these things being developed in 1987, when I looked into my crystal future balls collection, and promptly invested ~$15 in the factory that would be making them. SO, now that they have finally been introduced to the public, I am a friggin gazillionaire !!!!!!!!!!!
Damnit I thought my time stamp from earlier ment I was ahead of the game, but I didn't factor in premonitions from the past into my copyright form
Posted on Reply
#8
Prima.Vera
"Th3pwn3r said:
Excuse my ignorance but is it really effective? I didn't even think these things created any significant heat.
Just look on some Sammy's reviews. They are throttling down a lot due to overheating and they are not the only ones. Most of those type of SSDs are getting too warm.
Posted on Reply
#9
Th3pwn3r
"Prima.Vera said:
Just look on some Sammy's reviews. They are throttling down a lot due to overheating and they are not the only ones. Most of those type of SSDs are getting too warm.
To be honest I didn't think SSD in general produced heat. Do these NVMe drives produce significantly more heat than normal, 2.5'' ssd?
Posted on Reply
#10
Chloe Price
Looks great! Damn, I just hot an Alphacool heatsink for my M.2 SSD.
Posted on Reply
#11
Hood
"Th3pwn3r said:
To be honest I didn't think SSD in general produced heat. Do these NVMe drives produce significantly more heat than normal, 2.5'' ssd?
Only when writing large files, sustained sequential writes were causing some throttling due to heat. In normal use as an OS drive, the small files are written so fast, it never gets hot. To actually attain those sequential speeds (and high temps), the files being written would have to come from another fast NVMe drive - like in a high-dollar workstation used for content creation.
Posted on Reply
#12
Caelestis
"Th3pwn3r said:
Excuse my ignorance but is it really effective? I didn't even think these things created any significant heat.

M.2 SSD cooler test
by computerbase.de
Posted on Reply
#13
Gasaraki
"Th3pwn3r said:
Excuse my ignorance but is it really effective? I didn't even think these things created any significant heat.
Yes. Some M.2s will throttle due to heat.
Posted on Reply
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