Thursday, September 21st 2017

MSI RX Vega 64 Air Boost Edition Pictured, Not the Custom Card we Want

MSI's "custom" take on AMD's RX Vega graphics card has made an appearance in front of the camera. Dubbed Air Boost edition, this is really a glorified, MSI-branded reference edition Vega, with the same blower-type cooler that AMD seems to have used since forever. It keeps to MSI's Gaming X color scheme (and AMD's own at that) with black and red colors, and breathes custom innovation in the increased breathing space on the I/O port's second slot, since all 3x DisplayPort and 1x HDMI connectors have been moved to the first slot. As recent reports peg AMD's AIB's custom cards as coming only towards the second half of October, it seems that for now, this is the most "custom" edition of a Vega graphics card we're going to get.
Source: Videocardz
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19 Comments on MSI RX Vega 64 Air Boost Edition Pictured, Not the Custom Card we Want

#1
Ubersonic
My guess is this is their AMD equivalent to their Nvidia Aero cards, I.E like a reference card but with a cheaper shroud and weaker heatsink with no vapor chamber.
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#2
owen10578
Ubersonic said:
My guess is this is their AMD equivalent to their Nvidia Aero cards, I.E like a reference card but with a cheaper shroud and weaker heatsink with no vapor chamber.
Most of these kinds of cards actually usually use the same heatsink as the reference card so they're only an aesthetic change. Would be interesting if MSI's new IO cover would help temps though.
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#3
Totally
Tbh, that's what reference I/O should have been.
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#4
fullinfusion
Vanguard Beta Tester
Hell I could take a Dremel tool to the back of my card and have my own air boost :p

And I wonder what premium price MSI is going to charge for this lol
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#6
fullinfusion
Vanguard Beta Tester
Actually these reference coolers are not to bad as the past have shown us. A quick undervolt and slight fan curve setting and increase in clocks if wanted and well... tbh they're actually pretty quiet when gaming.
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#7
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
fullinfusion said:
Actually these reference coolers are not to bad as the past have shown us. A quick undervolt and slight fan curve setting and increase in clocks if wanted and well... tbh they're actually pretty quiet when gaming.
...and at full tilt, it might be loud but, it removes heat very well since it's going straight out the back of the case. I personally think that blower designs remove heat best but, tend to have the worst reputation when it comes to sound.
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#8
Divide Overflow
Still waiting for the real custom cooling versions of Vega to arrive. :banghead:
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#9
efikkan
So, a custom bracket and a sticker? Good job MSI…

Well, very few people will buy these Vega cards when there are excellent Pascal cards to choose from already, so there is no reason to wait for the more customized AIB cards.
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#10
MrGenius
Raevenlord said:
...and breathes custom innovation in the increased breathing space on the I/O port, since all 3x DisplayPort and 1x HDMI connectors have been moved to the second slot.


That's the first slot. And nothing's been moved.


Videocardz
The name Air Boost comes from the I/O bracket which has more holes for better air exhaust.
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#11
Ubersonic
owen10578 said:
Most of these kinds of cards actually usually use the same heatsink as the reference card so they're only an aesthetic change.
Like I said MSI's Geforce equivalent the Aero uses a cheaper heatsink with no vapor chamber, so will be interesting to see if they remove it on their AMD blower card too.


MrGenius said:
The name Air Boost comes from the I/O bracket which has more holes for better air exhaust.

What MSI don't mention is that their additional exhaust holes that their blowers have compared to reference cards actually require you to hack up your case in order to make them work :P

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#12
Jism
It's better to completely remove that bracket. The noise which is created is usually by restriction such as an air outlet. Biggest culprit is the fan at 100% ofcourse.
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#14
Digital Dreams
Fluffmeister said:
The protracted launch continues.
Yes, much like your AMD trolling.:rolleyes:
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#15
Vayra86
fullinfusion said:
Actually these reference coolers are not to bad as the past have shown us. A quick undervolt and slight fan curve setting and increase in clocks if wanted and well... tbh they're actually pretty quiet when gaming.
After two blower-type GTX 660's in SLI, I beg to differ. This is going to sound like jumbo jets taking off on Vega.

Bottom line: blowers NEVER again. They just can't compare, even the movement of all the air getting pushed out the back, IF you're lucky and don't have a super noisy radial fan anyway, is just too much to handle.

BTW this MSI design is another bit of proof that nobody wants to sell Vega at all. 'Look more gaps'... in a weird place. Shroud is probably one of the most boring ones of 2017. It looks tacky as hell
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#16
Chloe Price
I had similar "high-flow bracket" on my EVGA 970 blower, and I guess that really helps a little.
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#17
LocutusH
I guess someone had to do this also. A proper blower card, since AMD even failed with that on their own...
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#18
Fluffmeister
Digital Dreams said:
Yes, much like your AMD trolling.:rolleyes:
Boohoo.
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#19
Fouquin
LocutusH said:
I guess someone had to do this also. A proper blower card, since AMD even failed with that on their own...
Except from the pictures it looks like exactly the same blower that AMD already has on Vega, but now with MSI stickers and a dremmel'd I/O. Also I love the double standard, nVidia's reference blower lets the 1080 get up to 83C before throttling and fan speed increases, Vega 64s cooler does the same, but somehow AMD failed in their design and nVidia didn't...
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