Monday, September 25th 2017

Intel Unveils the 8th Generation Core Desktop Processor Family

Intel today announced that its new family of 8th Gen Intel Core desktop processors will be available for purchase beginning Oct. 5, 2017. The new desktop processor family is built for gamers, content creators and overclockers who require premium performance. Ranging from Intel Core i3 to Intel Core i7, these processors deliver premium performance for what comes next, opening the door for a new level of faster, easier and more immersive experiences.

This new family introduces the first-ever 6-core Intel Core i5 desktop processor and first-ever 4-core Intel Core i3 desktop processor. The family offers a wide range of performance options for consumers with unlocked1 "K" processors that deliver maximum tuning flexibility at each brand level and up to 40 platform PCIe 3.0 lanes for system expandability on graphics, storage and I/O. These processors are supported with new Intel Z370 chipset-based motherboards.
The top of the product stack - the Intel Core i7-8700K - is Intel's best gaming desktop processor ever.2 It is capable of 4.7 GHz maximum single-core turbo frequency, the highest frequency ever from Intel thanks to Intel Turbo Boost Technology 2.0, making it a performance powerhouse for both single and multi-threaded applications.

"We are laser-focused on giving the enthusiast community the ultimate desktop experience, from chart-topping performance to a platform that can flex with their needs," said Anand Srivatsa, general manager of the Desktop Platform Group at Intel. "Our 8th Gen Intel Core desktop processors deliver tremendous improvements across the board and - for gamers, in particular- offer an unbeatable experience."

Powerful, Fluid and Vivid Gaming
Gamers will revel in the powerful and fluid experience of gaming. Compared with 7th Gen Intel Core, gamers gain up to 25 percent more frames per second3 on popular and demanding games like Gears of War* 4. As gaming continues to expand to include a social audience while playing, performance while mega-tasking is critical so game + stream + record is now up to 2 times faster5 compared with a 3-year-old machine.

Advanced Content Creation
Save time and create more. The 8th Gen Intel Core desktop processor family positions Intel as the choice for speed, accuracy, power, format compatibility and high-quality graphics creation and consumption. Edit 4K 360-degree videos with ease - up to 32 percent faster6 compared with the previous generation - plus, edit content up to 65 percent faster4 compared with a 3-year-old PC.

Better Overclocking
Performance matters with overclocking. The 8th Gen Intel Core unlocked1 "K" processors will overclock to higher levels than prior generations. Intel has added new features to enhance the experience, including per core overclocking, max memory ratio up to 8,400 MT/s, real-time memory latency control, extended PLL trim controls, enhanced package power delivery, and updated Intel Extreme Tuning Utility and Intel Extreme Memory Profile.

Enhanced Platform
For the platform, the new Intel Z370 chipset provides improved power delivery needed for the new 6-core processors to reach their maximum performance as well as enhanced package power delivery for overclocking and memory routing support. More than 50 new motherboard and system designs will be available from a variety of leading providers.

Launch games and load media projects faster. Add Intel Optane memory to desktop computer with an 8th Gen Intel Core processor to gain additional accelerated system responsiveness, up to 2.1 times faster7 compared with a 5-year-old desktop with HDD alone.
8th Gen Intel Core desktop processors will be available beginning Oct. 5, 2017.
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25 Comments on Intel Unveils the 8th Generation Core Desktop Processor Family

#2
Liviu Cojocaru
Wasn't this already announced with the solar eclipse?
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#3
seggbizo
Will there be an i5-8500 and i5-8600 as well?
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#4
Boeing707
Liviu Cojocaru said:
Wasn't this already announced with the solar eclipse?
No, that was the Kaby Lake Refresh ULV CPU announcement.
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#5
Liviu Cojocaru
Boeing707 said:
No, that was the Kaby Lake Refresh ULV CPU announcement.
ok, my bad :)
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#6
Assimilator
40 PCIe lanes probably breaks down to 16 from CPU + 24 from chipset, i.e. exactly what we had with Z270.
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#7
Durvelle27
hmmmm

awaiting reviews on this

Prices aren't terrible
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#8
Chaitanya
Assimilator said:
40 PCIe lanes probably breaks down to 16 from CPU + 24 from chipset, i.e. exactly what we had with Z270.
Yep, even Intel "HEDT" CPU costing nearly 2.5x the cost of 8700k doesnt have 40 lane PCI-E from CPU. Looks like a desperate marketing ploy to misguide the customers.
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#9
EarthDog
Assimilator said:
40 PCIe lanes probably breaks down to 16 from CPU + 24 from chipset, i.e. exactly what we had with Z270.
Makes sense. There currently isnt a need for more outside of niche uses. Very few run multiple gpus and multiple m.2 drives. Those that do, simply need to step up to the HEDT platform where its offered.

More never hurts, but it isnt needed and those upset are (should be) a rare few. Isnt amd this way as well??? Ryzen 7 amd down dont have many lanes but threadripper on up does, right? Havent seen the same disappointment from the same users when the shoe is on the other foot....

Chaitanya said:
Yep, even Intel "HEDT" CPU costing nearly 2.5x the cost of 8700k doesnt have 40 lane PCI-E from CPU. Looks like a desperate marketing ploy to misguide the customers.
@Chaitanya

pretty sure its 40 from the cpu directly...
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#10
biffzinker
EarthDog said:
pretty sure its 40 from the cpu directly...
Starting with the 7900X, and up yes. Actually there is 44 but you lose 4 to the Platform Controller Hub.
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#11
shhnedo
seggbizo said:
Will there be an i5-8500 and i5-8600 as well?
I think this only outlines each core ix model. For example, there'll probably be an i3-8300(maybe 8200 too) as well as an i5-8500/8600. On the i7 side of things, they'll probably just introduce some low-power 8700S/T model along with the 8700 and 8700K(as usual).

EarthDog said:
Very few run multiple gpus and multiple m.2 drives. Those that do, simply need to step up to the HEDT platform where its offered.
Hypothetically, if I were to build myself a Coffee Lake PC and I decided to go with a Z chipset and an i7-8700K, why should I be limited to 1 GPU and 1 M.2 drive? I don't think it's outrageous to want to run 2-way SLI/CF and boot from an M.2 drive without having to worry about PCI-E lanes on a fairly expensive mainstream build. I get why the HEDT exists, but I don't think it should be the only "reasonable" option for multi-GPU/multi-M.2 configs. The mainstream consists of more than just "office-grade" motherboards/cpu-s.
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#12
EarthDog
biffzinker said:
Starting with the 7900X, and up yes. Actually there is 44 but you lose 4 to the Platform Controller Hub.
Spot on. I don't count the DMI. There are 40(44) lanes though on 7900X and up. I'd call it less of a marketing ploy and more of a lack of knowledge on the lane breakdown from whoever said that. ;)

8700K is a MAINSTREAM product. Makes complete sense to me a number of lanes available considering its place in the market and how many users can actually come close to that amount of lanes is extremely small.
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#13
jabbadap
seggbizo said:
Will there be an i5-8500 and i5-8600 as well?
Probably later, there's only z370 chipset first. There will be full Coffee Lake S cpu range when Cannon Lake PCH comes to market in Q1/18...
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#14
Assimilator
shhnedo said:
Hypothetically, if I were to build myself a Coffee Lake PC and I decided to go with a Z chipset and an i7-8700K, why should I be limited to 1 GPU and 1 M.2 drive?
Except you won't be, because 2 GPUs will run at PCIe 3.0 x8 each using the CPU's lanes, which is still more than enough bandwidth. M.2 drives only use 4 lanes each which means that you could drive up to 5 of them at full speed - if there was a motherboard that supported such.
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#15
Basard
Well, you had a good run AMD.... better luck next time. Bring us some higher clocks or I'm buying one of these next. I figure they've got another year or so until I burn this 9590 to death.

I think the new gimmick should be "triple-threading" or maybe even "quad-threading."

Edit: If only they sold them with rip-cords, like on dog-food bags, so you could just yank that and your chips is delidded.
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#16
shhnedo
@Assimilator Which is exactly why 20 lanes from the CPU is what I'd rather have, as opposed to 16(7th/6th gen and so on). My rant was somewhat misleadingly presented - one would expect that the most expensive mainstream part is fully capable of providing 20 lanes for 2 gpus and 1 PCI-E M.2 drive - something not too uncommon for a pricey mainstream build. Instead, we're getting only 16 lanes from the CPU. Yes, I'm aware how many lanes actually go to each gpu in a dual gpu config(for example). Yes, I'm aware of the imperfect SLI/CF scaling in some applications. I'm just not satisfied with what is provided at a certain price point. The current HEDT mess is another disappointment.
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#17
EarthDog
Why arent you satisfied? You can have sli and an m.2...

...where is the dissapointment? For a setup even more rare, 3 gpus? Or perhaps 2 m.2 and sli? By the time that hits the mainstream (2 m.2), sli/cf will have lost the favor it never had, and new chipsets will be out offering more. There just isnt a point.. cant please everyone.
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#18
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
Chaitanya said:
Yep, even Intel "HEDT" CPU costing nearly 2.5x the cost of 8700k doesnt have 40 lane PCI-E from CPU. Looks like a desperate marketing ploy to misguide the customers.
I made a table:
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#19
chaosmassive
shame on i5 8400 have such low clock speed
it would be nice otherwise
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#20
Assimilator
chaosmassive said:
shame on i5 8400 have such low clock speed
it would be nice otherwise
You can pretty much ignore that, since most programs are single-threaded you'll generally be sitting at the 4GHz boost speed.
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#21
Prima.Vera
Why would anyone want to upgrade to this crappy gen is beyond my understanding especially the next gen is going to require new chipset (again) and will have an 8 Cores CPU i7 on it.
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#22
chaosmassive
Prima.Vera said:
Why would anyone want to upgrade to this crappy gen is beyond my understanding especially the next gen is going to require new chipset (again) and will have an 8 Cores CPU i7 on it.
some consumer still rocking their old platform like either 2000~4000 series intel CPU and might not familiarize with AMD,
if they're willing to upgrade to 8000 series, that would be pretty significant jump
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#23
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
shhnedo said:
@Assimilator Which is exactly why 20 lanes from the CPU is what I'd rather have, as opposed to 16(7th/6th gen and so on). My rant was somewhat misleadingly presented - one would expect that the most expensive mainstream part is fully capable of providing 20 lanes for 2 gpus and 1 PCI-E M.2 drive - something not too uncommon for a pricey mainstream build. Instead, we're getting only 16 lanes from the CPU. Yes, I'm aware how many lanes actually go to each gpu in a dual gpu config(for example). Yes, I'm aware of the imperfect SLI/CF scaling in some applications. I'm just not satisfied with what is provided at a certain price point. The current HEDT mess is another disappointment.
M.2 drives don't need to run directly off the CPU. Running them off the 24 lanes provided by the chips etc is perfectly acceptable, an no one will be able to even tell the difference.
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#24
Prima.Vera
chaosmassive said:
some consumer still rocking their old platform like either 2000~4000 series intel CPU and might not familiarize with AMD,
if they're willing to upgrade to 8000 series, that would be pretty significant jump
I'm rocking on the 3000 series, and uhm, no, upgrading to 8000 series, DEFINITELY is not a significant jump :) :). Especially that next year we'll have the 8 Core for the mainstream, and also a new chipset.
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#25
Dr_b_
Intel fix the thermal paste. Its impossible to keep these things running at reasonable temps even at stock when under maximum load.
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