Monday, March 5th 2018

Final Fantasy XV Windows Edition Denuvo Cracked Before Release

Initial speculations stated that Final Fantasy XV Windows Edition didn't employ Denuvo's anti-tamper technology. For starters, there was no mention of Denuvo anywhere in the EULA when the game went up for pre-order. It also wasn't present in the demo. However, five days prior to the official release, Square Enix updated the game's Steam store page and EULA stating that Final Fantasy XV Windows Edition indeed came with Denuvo.

Although Final Fantasy XV Windows Edition won't be released until tomorrow, consumers who purchased the title can pre-load the game beforehand. Since Steam preloads are always encrypted, warez group normally are forced to look elsewhere. For reasons unknown, Origin made available the unencrypted version of the game files. Chinese video game warez group 3DM was quick to act and got their hands on the unencrypted files. They later replaced the executable with the DRM-free one from the demo. What happened afterwards is history. A few users reported that they were able to advance as far as the ninth chapter without hiccups. According to one particular individual, he finished the game with the pirated copy, but it hasn't been confirmed yet.
Source: DSOGaming
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13 Comments on Final Fantasy XV Windows Edition Denuvo Cracked Before Release

#2
EntropyZ
They must really hate cucknuvo, or just like the challenge or the lack thereof.

I wish there was a happy compromise with DRM if they have to implement it.
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#3
_JP_
And this, kids, is why you should never do DRM.
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#4
Vayra86
Another axe at the festering cancer called Denuvo. Kudos
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#6
windwhirl
lexluthermiester
Denuvo is a waste of time. When are devs gonna get it?
The answer you hope to get: "You're right. All games are going to be DRM-Free from now on, no matter what."
The answer you will get: "You're right. Let's add VMProtect, Steam, Cloakware, this other obscure I-don't-know-what-is-called DRM and also a system driver to screw with the memory management and CPU threads, just for laughs. Oh and a rootkit to screw anything trying to hack the code." God knows they'd do it if they could.

I wouldn't mind DRM if it wasn't such a burden on my computer resources, but between the multi-layered DRM that's so common these days and the "need" to have micro transactions every-freaking-where, even for a save file on my own local storage, I honestly feel kinda angry.
Posted on Reply
#7
lexluthermiester
windwhirl
The answer you hope to get: "You're right. All games are going to be DRM-Free from now on, no matter what."
Wouldn't that be excellent? We could only hope that devs and publishers got a clue and realized DRM doesn't stop pirates, it only irritates and pisses everyone off.
windwhirl
The answer you will get: "You're right. Let's add VMProtect, Steam, Cloakware, this other obscure I-don't-know-what-is-called DRM and also a system driver to screw with the memory management and CPU threads, just for laughs. Oh and a rootkit to screw anything trying to hack the code." God knows they'd do it if they could.
If companies started doing that, they would kill off the industry.
windwhirl
I wouldn't mind DRM if it wasn't such a burden on my computer resources, but between the multi-layered DRM that's so common these days and the "need" to have micro transactions every-freaking-where, even for a save file on my own local storage, I honestly feel kinda angry.
Strongly disagree with this. I have zero tolerance for it. DRM is effectively the devs way of calling us all thieves. This is one of the reasons I love GOG.com's approach. They trust by default and treat us all like honest people, which most of us are or would prefer to be if given a choice.
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#8
Bansaku
Bwahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahahaha....cough, wheez, hack...hahahahahahahahahahahahahaha......
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#9
TheGuruStud
Spends presumably hundreds of thousands on denuvo, but can't be bothered to cripple demo EXE lol. And we thought using demo EXEs was so last century.
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#10
chaosmassive
Next rumour: Denuvo will launch dongle license with proprietary interface for PC games, Internet need to be connected all the time.
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#11
TheDeeGee
Make a good game, release a playable demo, and no DRM will be needed.
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#12
windwhirl
lexluthermiester
If companies started doing that, they would kill off the industry.
Didn't stop Sony from trying that approach with music CDs, though.
lexluthermiester
Strongly disagree with this. I have zero tolerance for it. DRM is effectively the devs way of calling us all thieves. This is one of the reasons I love GOG.com's approach. They trust by default and treat us all like honest people, which most of us are or would prefer to be if given a choice.
Yeah. GOG's approach works surprisingly well.

DRM is a pain in the rear (besides the ethical reasoning you mentioned), and while I somewhat understand why devs keep pushing for it, I'd wish they'd stop putting more than one DRM layer in games, I'd like it even better if I never even noticed the existence of DRM (things like asking for Internet connection for single player mode are just plain stupid) and maybe consider removing the thing after the first couple of months. Ideally it would never exist. It wastes dev's time that could be used for something else.
Posted on Reply
#13
lexluthermiester
TheGuruStud
And we thought using demo EXEs was so last century.
Apparently not. Personally think it's funny as hell! :clap::roll:
windwhirl
(things like asking for Internet connection for single player mode are just plain stupid)
That! I mean seriously, what the actual eff! Why? I wondered this about Command & Conquer Red Alert 3. I swiftly defeated that nonsense and played on. You want to talk about irritated...
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