Sunday, April 22nd 2018

AMD Officially Discloses Ryzen 3 2200GE, Ryzen 5 2400GE Energy-Efficient APUs

AMD has disclosed, via a pretty standard addition to their website, the existence of some ill-guarded secrets. The secrets in point are low-power variants of the company's 2000-series APUs, which come and join AMD's lineup with lowered TDPs to increased energy efficiency. The Ryzen 3 2200GE and Ryzen 5 2400GE slot right alongside their previously released counterparts, but have enjoyed some clock tuning (and likely some silicon binning as well) to bring their TDPs down from the 2200 and 2400's 65 W to only 35 W - an impressive feat considering there's no difference, at the execution unit level, on these silicon pieces.
The Ryzen 3 2200GE trots along with 4 Zen cores (sans SMT, so limited to four real threads) that run at a 3.2 GHz base frequency, with supported boosts of up to 3.6 GHz (compared to 3.5 and 3.7 GHz, respectively, on the 2200G variant). Its 8 Vega GPU cores run at 1100 MHz. The Ryzen 5 2400GE, however, enables SMT for a full eight threads, and features a 3.2 GHz base clock that can boost up to 3.8 GHz (3.6 GHz and 3.9 GHz respectively on its higher-power counterpart, the 2400G). The integrated graphics processing unit trots along at the same performance level as the 65 W unit, though, with its 11 Vega cores running at 1250 MHz. AMD looks to be cementing itself as the best option for a silent, respectable performance HTPC, bar none.
Source: Tweakers.net
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21 Comments on AMD Officially Discloses Ryzen 3 2200GE, Ryzen 5 2400GE Energy-Efficient APUs

#1
sergionography
APUs are becoming more appealing than ever with the crazy GPU prices out there. I seriously have been considering buying a 2400G for some light gaming as i sold my GPU last year and been using an old hd5770
Posted on Reply
#3
Darmok N Jalad
I'd really like to see Apple adopt these CPUs in some of their lineup. The Mac mini hasn't been updated in ages, and these Ryzen APUs sure seem like a winning solution for Apple. They'd probably be able to help Apple hit the cheaper price points as well.
sergionography said:
APUs are becoming more appealing than ever with the crazy GPU prices out there. I seriously have been considering buying a 2400G for some light gaming as i sold my GPU last year and been using an old hd5770
I would like to see Apple use these in maybe the base iMac or maybe they could update the aging mini. Probably not gonna happen, but it would be awesome.
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#4
sergionography
Darmok N Jalad said:
I'd really like to see Apple adopt these CPUs in some of their lineup. The Mac mini hasn't been updated in ages, and these Ryzen APUs sure seem like a winning solution for Apple. They'd probably be able to help Apple hit the cheaper price points as well.


I would like to see Apple use these in maybe the base iMac or maybe they could update the aging mini. Probably not gonna happen, but it would be awesome.
I think they would've done that had it not been for the fact that they intend to move away from x86 and into using their own in-house arm chips. Investing in AMD means they have to introduce a new design tier and ecosystem that simply isn't parallel to the direction they are heading. Otherwise its a welcome idea. A similar approach that could work for apple is simply dumping intel and designing semi-custom chips with AMD. I think that would he a nice middle ground instead of going to arm cold turkey.
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#5
Mussels
Moderprator
that 2400GE could be slapped into a laptop for one powerful low wattage system :/

hell it'd make a great HTPC
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#6
GoldenX
Apple can also use their ARM CPU desing, but use an AMD designed GPU on it.
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#7
londiste
Maybe Raven Ridge is in the cards for my small internet box (with 90W PSU) after all. I had a chance to play around with 2200G, at full load that has 120W power consumption both reported in software and supported by power meter. GE models seem to be a good fit.

Based on what we have seen so far, they will consume considerably more than 35W though.
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#8
Imsochobo
londiste said:
Maybe Raven Ridge is in the cards for my small internet box (with 90W PSU) after all. I had a chance to play around with 2200G, at full load that has 120W power consumption both reported in software and supported by power meter. GE models seem to be a good fit.

Based on what we have seen so far, they will consume considerably more than 35W though.
x300 chipsets or more like lack of chipset is what you'd want.

B350\X470 is seriously power hungry!

Edit:
sergionography said:
APUs are becoming more appealing than ever with the crazy GPU prices out there. I seriously have been considering buying a 2400G for some light gaming as i sold my GPU last year and been using an old hd5770
2400G should be as good as a I5 7600 and not far from i5 8400.
gpu included.
it's crazy how budget friendly they are, if the 2200g goes for cheap I'll buy one for my router as I'm sure I can use that gpu for something fun using opencl :)
Posted on Reply
#9
Brusfantomet
Mussels said:
that 2400GE could be slapped into a laptop for one powerful low wattage system :/

hell it'd make a great HTPC
the 2400G is a great HTPC cpu, I am using ut for that purpose.
Posted on Reply
#10
NC37
sergionography said:
I think they would've done that had it not been for the fact that they intend to move away from x86 and into using their own in-house arm chips. Investing in AMD means they have to introduce a new design tier and ecosystem that simply isn't parallel to the direction they are heading. Otherwise its a welcome idea. A similar approach that could work for apple is simply dumping intel and designing semi-custom chips with AMD. I think that would he a nice middle ground instead of going to arm cold turkey.
Investing in AMD also means they'd have to sell Macs within reason. Pretty much certain Apple won't do that.

The last time Macs were decently priced was before they switched to x86. Despite what Jobs promised, post switch saw Mac prices climb and variety of models reduced. The only ones getting the benefit was Apple. They in turn, introduced Mac users to the joys that is prebuilt PCs. Cheap components designed to die the day the warranty is void. I know so many x86 Mac users who have been through Mac after Mac. Things just keep dying.
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#11
FMinus
londiste said:
Maybe Raven Ridge is in the cards for my small internet box (with 90W PSU) after all. I had a chance to play around with 2200G, at full load that has 120W power consumption both reported in software and supported by power meter. GE models seem to be a good fit.

Based on what we have seen so far, they will consume considerably more than 35W though.
It is 2018 and people still think TDP is power consumption, I've lost faith in humanity.
Posted on Reply
#12
Valantar
londiste said:
Maybe Raven Ridge is in the cards for my small internet box (with 90W PSU) after all. I had a chance to play around with 2200G, at full load that has 120W power consumption both reported in software and supported by power meter. GE models seem to be a good fit.

Based on what we have seen so far, they will consume considerably more than 35W though.
If you run power virus loads like Prime95+FurMark, sure, you'll hit 120W. Under normal usage? Not the same at all. I've seen multiple reviews listing at-wall (including power supply losses and the rest of the system) power draw while gaming (Witcher 3 and other power hungry games) for both 2200G and 2400G below 90W. That's definitely toeing the line with a 90W PSU, though, and with no PC headroom. Still, it's likely the chips allow for higher package power draws than TDP as long as thermals are in check - after all, these aren't mobile chips, so power draw in and of itself isn't the main focus, but rather thermals. Low power allows for UCFF/passive cooling chassis and so on, where thermals are key.


It's great that they're getting these low power SKUs out though. I've been toying with the idea of a scratch-built SFF HTPC with an internal custom PSU setup (Mean Well AC-DC 12V PSU + DC-DC converter/Pico PSU) , but getting a powerful enough AC-DC unit with high efficiency here in Norway is a challenge. This makes things a bit easier, as the 100W unit that's easily available should be plenty powerful. Won't be OCing it any I suppose (though a light GPU OC ought to be possible).
Posted on Reply
#13
jabbadap
For AMDs sake, I hope these really find their way to Dell, HP, Lenovo, Fujitsu etc. USFF desktops. Missing thermal solution at least sounds like a OEM product for system builders.
Posted on Reply
#14
TheinsanegamerN
NC37 said:
Investing in AMD also means they'd have to sell Macs within reason. Pretty much certain Apple won't do that.

The last time Macs were decently priced was before they switched to x86. Despite what Jobs promised, post switch saw Mac prices climb and variety of models reduced. The only ones getting the benefit was Apple. They in turn, introduced Mac users to the joys that is prebuilt PCs. Cheap components designed to die the day the warranty is void. I know so many x86 Mac users who have been through Mac after Mac. Things just keep dying.
No they wouldnt. When they switched to cheaper, slower, less supported AMD mobile GPUs instead of the newer nvidia models, did prices go down?

Nope. They went UP Because thinness.

Apple could charge the same price they do now for an AMD chip, which only makes me wonder more why they havent yet. So much more money laying around waiting to be collected.
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#15
Brusfantomet
Valantar said:
If you run power virus loads like Prime95+FurMark, sure, you'll hit 120W. Under normal usage? Not the same at all. I've seen multiple reviews listing at-wall (including power supply losses and the rest of the system) power draw while gaming (Witcher 3 and other power hungry games) for both 2200G and 2400G below 90W. That's definitely toeing the line with a 90W PSU, though, and with no PC headroom. Still, it's likely the chips allow for higher package power draws than TDP as long as thermals are in check - after all, these aren't mobile chips, so power draw in and of itself isn't the main focus, but rather thermals. Low power allows for UCFF/passive cooling chassis and so on, where thermals are key.


It's great that they're getting these low power SKUs out though. I've been toying with the idea of a scratch-built SFF HTPC with an internal custom PSU setup (Mean Well AC-DC 12V PSU + DC-DC converter/Pico PSU) , but getting a powerful enough AC-DC unit with high efficiency here in Norway is a challenge. This makes things a bit easier, as the 100W unit that's easily available should be plenty powerful. Won't be OCing it any I suppose (though a light GPU OC ought to be possible).
Shure, its nice to use a 35W solution, but the 65W normal versions can easaly be pasively cooled already.
these are, in my mind more fitting for a laptop then a HTPC in my mind.
my current HTPC has a 2400G, it is cooled by a FC8 alpha, witch is keeping it cool under my use.
as for the power, check the nano 160 psu.

i got them here PSU and chasis (nowegian shop)
Posted on Reply
#16
sergionography
FMinus said:
It is 2018 and people still think TDP is power consumption, I've lost faith in humanity.
Probably because the naming is stupid and misleading. TDP stands for thermal design output and is measured in watts; which is a unit used mostly for measuring electrical energy transfer. From my understanding what it means is expected typical/or worstcase heat output from a chip using x amount of watts. So whole its not actual power usage it does seem to be a general ballpark figure.
Posted on Reply
#17
TheGuruStud
Oh, look, AMD finally adjusted the voltages correctly instead of pumping .2+ more through them than necessary. The overvolting has been going on since at least phenom II. You could take off .3+ and still run them at stock clocks. Power consumption acctually was impressive had they bothered to bin anything at all.
Posted on Reply
#18
Valantar
Brusfantomet said:
Shure, its nice to use a 35W solution, but the 65W normal versions can easaly be pasively cooled already.
these are, in my mind more fitting for a laptop then a HTPC in my mind.
my current HTPC has a 2400G, it is cooled by a FC8 alpha, witch is keeping it cool under my use.
as for the power, check the nano 160 psu.

i got them here PSU and chasis (nowegian shop)
I'm considering this one, though I have no clue as to the quality. As for the AC-DC side, I'd like to avoid an external brick, which is tricky. Mean Well makes some very nice and efficient AC-12V DC PSUs for embedded use (their EPP series specifically), but the only version available in Norway is the EPP-100-12, which is sadly rated for only 100W (75W if passively cooled). That's on the low side for sticking this into a custom ITX case with a single fan providing airflow for everything, as is my plan.
Posted on Reply
#19
TheGuruStud
Valantar said:
I'm considering this one, though I have no clue as to the quality. As for the AC-DC side, I'd like to avoid an external brick, which is tricky. Mean Well makes some very nice and efficient AC-12V DC PSUs for embedded use (their EPP series specifically), but the only version available in Norway is the EPP-100-12, which is sadly rated for only 100W (75W if passively cooled). That's on the low side for sticking this into a custom ITX case with a single fan providing airflow for everything, as is my plan.
Assuming some decent 19V boards become available, I use old 95W laptop adapters. They're still small and the case is tiny, b/c even slim PSUs are bulky for a NUC sized case. Internal is pointless, b/c you've just ballooned the case defeating the whole point of tiny. I bet I can even cram a thin laptop adapter in a tiny case. That won't happen at a 2" thick size.
Posted on Reply
#20
Brusfantomet
Valantar said:
I'm considering this one, though I have no clue as to the quality. As for the AC-DC side, I'd like to avoid an external brick, which is tricky. Mean Well makes some very nice and efficient AC-12V DC PSUs for embedded use (their EPP series specifically), but the only version available in Norway is the EPP-100-12, which is sadly rated for only 100W (75W if passively cooled). That's on the low side for sticking this into a custom ITX case with a single fan providing airflow for everything, as is my plan.
I see, my goal was a completely passive case solution, for that a external brick is actually a positive aspect, as the heat from the AC/DC conversion is removed from the case completely, and a god DC/DC has low loss, and therefore low heat output.

The point is anyway the “available in Norway” part, its not that bad to import stud yourself, remember that the MVA tax point was raised to 350 nok.

However, that 75W should be enough for the 2400GE, as long as you refrain from running furmark for extended periods.
Have an old A8-7600 (a 65W cpu) running on a 90 W pico PSU, been stable for over 2 years.
That 75W supply will handle short bursts of 100W, just not prolonged use at that wattage.
Posted on Reply
#21
Valantar
TheGuruStud said:
Assuming some decent 19V boards become available, I use old 95W laptop adapters. They're still small and the case is tiny, b/c even slim PSUs are bulky for a NUC sized case. Internal is pointless, b/c you've just ballooned the case defeating the whole point of tiny. I bet I can even cram a thin laptop adapter in a tiny case. That won't happen at a 2" thick size.
I'm not aiming for NUC-like size, but rather an "optimal" balance of size, performance, cooling and noise level. Current plan is to scratch-build a case that fits an ITX board and a small AC-DC psu like the EPP-100-12 linked above (they're really tiny), squeeze in as large a down-draft heat sink as I can fit (I'm actually looking at adapting an old Arctic Accelero S1 that I have lying around - the cold plate is tiny, but it might work), and cooling the entire setup with a single 140mm or 180mm fan mounted to the "top" panel above the motherboard (with exhaust holes beneath and around the board). This should provide sufficient cooling for everything, at least in theory, while keeping noise minimal. I can't stand high-pitched noise, so large fans are the way to go.

Also, in my eyes, an internal PSU is a massive improvement. Power bricks are messy (well, nigh impossible to cable manage/route) and prone to failure. They generally aren't designed for sustained high loads either. Oh, and finding anything above 90W is difficult and/or expensive. As such, an industrial/embedded AC-DC PSU (designed for continuous load) ought to be a significant improvement, and the Mean Well EPP series is small enough to be negligible next to an ITX motherboard.

Brusfantomet said:
I see, my goal was a completely passive case solution, for that a external brick is actually a positive aspect, as the heat from the AC/DC conversion is removed from the case completely, and a god DC/DC has low loss, and therefore low heat output.

The point is anyway the “available in Norway” part, its not that bad to import stud yourself, remember that the MVA tax point was raised to 350 nok.

However, that 75W should be enough for the 2400GE, as long as you refrain from running furmark for extended periods.
Have an old A8-7600 (a 65W cpu) running on a 90 W pico PSU, been stable for over 2 years.
That 75W supply will handle short bursts of 100W, just not prolonged use at that wattage.
I'm considering importing an EPP-200-12, but that'll easily land me above 1000NOK with shipping, VAT, processing fees and all the rest. Not all that enticing.

As for the EPP-100-12, it's actually rated for 100W continuous output at 50C ambient temps with 20cfm airflow across it (the 75W rating is passive/zero airflow) so with some cooling it is theoretically sufficient for a 2200G or even a 2400G with some undervolting. It's still a bit too close for comfort though, and I'd really like the option to OC the iGPU some, which blows me past 100W easily, which is what's making me hold off. That I'm not likely to have a huge budget for this build when it comes time to build it is another factor, of course. Definitely not making this easy for myself :P Then again, this build isn't really likely to happen this year. And next year there'll be even better APUs :)
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