Wednesday, June 6th 2018

ZOTAC Showcases Its Forward-Thinking Gaming Philosophy at COMPUTEX 2018

ZOTAC took to COMPUTEX 2018 to stretch its gaming legs. In one way or another, their products on showcase are meant to allow users to freely enjoy digital worlds, in the way they best see fit. Their mobile, VR GO 2.0 backpack, which carries an Intel 8700T CPU as well as NVIDIA's GTX 1070 graphics, now includes SPECTRA lighting (for all the people looking at you while you enjoy your mobile VR gaming, naturally).
Whether with the VR GO 2.0 or other, of the more immobile type solutions, it's all about experiences. Other ZOTAC products on offer include their MEK ULTRA gaming system, packing a ZOTAC 1080 Ti AMP graphics card and an Intel Core i9-7900X CPU; their MEK MINI gaming system, which reduces the overall footprint much more than it reduces gaming performance (an Intel Core i7 8700T CPU and a GeForce GTX 1080 deliver the performance chops); and, of course, ZOTAC's renowned ZBOX solutions offer a true work or gaming station in a small footprint ( their ZBOX Q on station packed an NVIDIA Quadro P5000 graphics card alongside Intel's Optane, for instance).
As a bonus, ZOTAC also took to COMPUTEX a "small" infographic on its graphics card design and LED lighting philosophy, so here are those pictures for you as well.
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9 Comments on ZOTAC Showcases Its Forward-Thinking Gaming Philosophy at COMPUTEX 2018

#1
PowerPC
Finally someone at least attempts to show that Computex should be about innovation.
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#2
Valantar
a) Why do they list monitors in the specs of their PCs? Are they included?
b) Why do they list this run-of-the-mill 1080p monitor as a "gaming" monitor?

Other than that, is there anything new here? The illustrations of cooler designs are neat, I suppose. Zotac generally makes nicely designed products, and their SFF engineering seems great, but I feel like I've seen this all before.
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#3
PowerPC
Valantar
Other than that, is there anything new here?
At least they tried with the backpack PC. The cases look butt-ugly, but seem to be of high quality.
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#5
PowerPC
Valantar
You know that this is their second revision, right?
It's still something I want to see at Computex because the improvements are actually visible with the second revision. I can't see any difference with the 1000 "new" DDR-4 kits.
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#6
Valantar
PowerPC
It's still something I want to see at Computex because the improvements are actually visible with the second revision. I can't see any difference with the 1000 "new" DDR-4 kits.
That's true. Seems like they're more or less the only ones sticking with this too. Perhaps not that surprising, given that the VR market hasn't exactly exploded in the two years since the first generation.

While these PCs are pretty neat, they're too specialized, expensive and un-upgradeable for me. But if you're rich and a massive VR fan, or starting a VR arcade or some such, why not?
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#7
PowerPC
Valantar
While these PCs are pretty neat, they're too specialized, expensive and un-upgradeable for me. But if you're rich and a massive VR fan, or starting a VR arcade or some such, why not?
Or why not have your own personal VR arcade anywhere you go? I think they are trying to show that the hardware is ready, now we are waiting for the software to catch up. This is what I want to see hardware manufacturers do. Actually create hardware prototypes, even if their use for now is just in the potential they bring. I mean, I can imagine a lot of interesting outdoor VR and AR applications that would need a powerful PC.
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#8
Easy Rhino
Linux Advocate
When you need to go hiking but can't go without your huge porn collection.
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#9
Arjai
Easy Rhino
When you need to go hiking but can't go without your huge porn collection.
LOL! :laugh:
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