Thursday, July 12th 2018

QNAP Completes its 9-bay NAS Lineup With the Award-Winning TVS-951X 10GBASE-T Multimedia NAS

Following the releases of the TS-932X (powered by an AnnapurnaLabs CPU) and the TS-963X (powered by an AMD CPU), QNAP Systems, Inc. today completes the high-capacity-compact-size 9-bay NAS lineup with the introduction of the TVS-951X 10GbE multimedia NAS. The new model is powered by a 7th-generation Intel Kaby Lake processor, providing a NAS private cloud solution that combines high capacity and 10GbE high-speed connectivity. The TVS-951X NAS has also won the Red Dot Award (2018) and Computex d&i Award for high-quality product design.
Powered by a 7th-generation Kaby Lake 14nm Intel Celeron 3865U low-power dual-core 1.8 GHz processor, the TVS-951X features a hybrid drive bay design (including five 3.5-inch drive bays and four 2.5-inch SSD slots) with built-in 10GBASE-T (10G/5G/2.5G/1G/100M) network port. Combining hard drives and SSDs allow users to maximize both capacity and performance with SSD caching and Qtier auto-tiering storage. Combined with 10GbE connectivity, multimedia transcoding/streaming, and 4K HDMI output, the TVS-951X provides users with a cost-effective, highly-efficient, and high-performance NAS solution with feature-rich multimedia applications.
"The TVS-951X provides the high potential storage capacity of a 9-bay NAS within the frame of a standard 5-bay NAS. With a hybrid storage structure that allows the joint benefits of hard drives and SSDs to be fully maximized, the TVS-951X excels in providing small/medium businesses with a dependable and scalable storage solution."

Jason Hsu, Product Manager of QNAP.
Featuring advanced Intel HD Graphics 610, the TVS-951X supports dual-channel 4K H.264/H.265 hardware decoding and real-time transcoding. Users can directly enjoy videos up to 4K@30FPS on a TV using the HDMI output, or they can stream their media files to multiple devices using QNAP's Cinema28 multi-zone multimedia application, Plex Media Server, or Roon Server.

Key specifications
  • TVS-951X-8G: 8GB DDR4 RAM (2 x 4 GB), upgradable to 32GB
  • TVS-951X-2G: 2GB DDR4 RAM (1 x 2 GB), upgradable to 32GB
Tower model, 5 x 3.5-inch drive bays and 4 x 2.5-inch SSD slots; 7th-generation Intel Celeron 3865U 1.8 GHz dual-core processor, dual-channel DDR4 RAM (upgradable to 32GB); hot-swappable 2.5-inch/3.5-inch SATA 6Gbps HDD/SSD; 1x 10GBASE-T (10G/5G/2.5G/1G/100M) LAN port, 1x Gigabit LAN port, 1x HDMI v1.4b output; 3 x USB 3.0 ports; 1x 3.5 mm Line-out audio jack; 1x built-in speaker

Availability
The new TVS-951X is now available.
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7 Comments on QNAP Completes its 9-bay NAS Lineup With the Award-Winning TVS-951X 10GBASE-T Multimedia NAS

#1
bug
advanced Intel HD Graphics 610
It's perfectly adequate for a NAS enclosure, but I fail to see what's "advanced" about it. It's practically as poor as it gets when selecting an IGP today.
Posted on Reply
#2
Fx
I can guarantee that it's going to have an "advanced" price tag for far more than I would be willing to part with when I can build my own.

The only real advantage to these overpriced systems is they are ready to go upon purchase and very compact. The low-power and compactness has its cost in upgradability restriction though.
Posted on Reply
#3
bug
Fx said:
I can guarantee that it's going to have an "advanced" price tag for far more than I would be willing to part with when I can build my own.

The only real advantage to these overpriced systems is they are ready to go upon purchase and very compact. The low-power and compactness has its cost in upgradability restriction though.
Economy of scale (or lack thereof). How many of these you think they sell?
Posted on Reply
#4
Fx
bug said:
Economy of scale (or lack thereof). How many of these you think they sell?
Honestly, no idea bug. I'm sure that make a good profit from their NAS lineup though since they have so many models.

I think their biggest consumers are SMBs, freelancers and consultants which is a pretty big market.
Posted on Reply
#5
bug
Fx said:
Honestly, no idea bug. I'm sure that make a good profit from their NAS lineup though since they have so many models.

I think their biggest consumers are SMBs, freelancers and consultants which is a pretty big market.
I don't know either, but I'm guessing there's one NAS rack out there for every 10 PCs at best. Not all of them made by QNAP and of those made by QNAP, probably less than a quarter are 9-bay solutions (again, at best). That is why I believe these are so expensive.
Posted on Reply
#6
Fx
bug said:
I don't know either, but I'm guessing there's one NAS rack out there for every 10 PCs at best. Not all of them made by QNAP and of those made by QNAP, probably less than a quarter are 9-bay solutions (again, at best). That is why I believe these are so expensive.
I wouldn't be surprised. Synology used to absolutely dominate this market, and then QNAP jumped into the pool head first. They are an easy sell for anyone who just wants extra storage of 2-9 drives but don't want to manage a server or don't know how to.

It is nice you can buy them and throw up some immense storage in 15 minutes. I speculate that they are so expensive just because the vendors can get away with it. Kind of like how businesses spends tens of thousands in buying servers when they could saves many thousands if they bought Supermicro and built the servers themselves.

The primary metric for simply buying NAS vs building is time and in-house expertise of specing and building. I've been in numerous positions where the IT director wanted a hands on approach and am now at one where the director just wants to buy and be done with it.

I've always loved to build and maintain.
Posted on Reply
#7
bug
Yeah, I love tinkering with stuff as well and also believe a solution you build for yourself can be more finely tuned. At the same time I understand not everyone is about tinkering or wants to keep support in house. As long as there's choice, I won't complain.
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