Tuesday, October 9th 2018

Microsoft Raises Prices of Windows 10 Home Licenses

Not long after releasing a poorly tested Windows 10 October 2018 update that has wiped out user data for countless users, exposing Microsoft to class-action litigation for data loss despite its update EULA stating that Microsoft isn't liable to data loss; the company has shored up retail prices of its Windows 10 Home licenses. Windows 10 Home now sells for USD $139, a 40% hike from its $99.99 general availability price on the Microsoft Store. OEM licenses of the operating system can still be had for $99 on Newegg. The Windows 10 Pro version still retails for $199.
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41 Comments on Microsoft Raises Prices of Windows 10 Home Licenses

#1
StrayKAT
Just when I thought they were getting smarter. Apparently not.

Glad I bought them when I did though.
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#2
trog100
everything seems to be suffering high price increases.. hardware software you name it.. being as the potential buyers havnt suddenly got richer it makes me wonder exactly what is going on..

making more money aint quite as simple as jacking up your prices.. maybe they think it is.. :)

trog
Posted on Reply
#3
IceScreamer
Thank god I can get my copy through university. I don't see the reason for the price increase, apart from obvious greed.
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#4
Joss
"trog100 said:
everything seems to be suffering high price increases.. hardware software you name it.. being as the potential buyers havnt suddenly got richer it makes me wonder exactly what is going on..
It's called buying on credit, lessons haven't been learned. Wait for the next Lehman Moment, it'll be epic.
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#6
chaosmassive
User: we lost our data !
M$: shut up and give me your money !
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#7
trog100
"Joss said:
It's called buying on credit, lessons haven't been learned. Wait for the next Lehman Moment, it'll be epic.
oddly enough those thoughts did go through my mind.. maybe they all know the crash is coming and are grabbing what they can while they can.. :)

trog
Posted on Reply
#8
jboydgolfer
windows 10 has been free (in some way or form) for years, anyone in a position of still needing a standalone key is a victim of poor planning. I must have accumulated 5 or 6 keys over these few years, since i knew eventually my kids who prefer win7 would need to upgrade sooner or later, as i would myself. I would imagine that it would be humiliating and infuriating to have to pay $100+ for a operating system, that was free for SO long. Maybe ill go through my Win10Pro licenses, see which ones arent activated , and make a nice profit :)
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#10
lZKoce
"jboydgolfer said:
windows 10 has been free (in some way or form) for years, anyone in a position of still needing a standalone key is a victim of poor planning. I must have accumulated 5 or 6 keys over these few years, since i knew eventually my kids who prefer win7 would need to upgrade sooner or later, as i would myself. I would imagine that it would be humiliating and infuriating to have to pay $100+ for a operating system, that was free for SO long. Maybe ill go through my Win10Pro licenses, see which ones arent activated , and make a nice profit :)
It was free upgrade for people that had previously purchased at least one version of Windows from MS, but for adult people assembling new PC's now? I don't see anything humiliating. Also, there are so many ways you can "get" keys these days, that for non-tech-savvy people it's hard to explain how the same OS might cost a few bucks on some websites and $100 for the retail version. Even here in TPU we have at least two threads discussion how moral/legal, etc it is to buy ultra cheap version of Windows and whether that makes you a pirate or not.
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#11
Melvis
So its now the price at which us Aussies pay? lol (sadly that means its gone up alot here)
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#12
ssdpro
"Joss said:
It's called buying on credit, lessons haven't been learned. Wait for the next Lehman Moment, it'll be epic.
Inflation and the growing bubble is out of control. A lot of pain is lurking in the USA which ripples everywhere.
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#13
TheinsanegamerN
Wait, people buy windows?

"ssdpro said:
Inflation and the growing bubble is out of control. A lot of pain is lurking in the USA which ripples everywhere.
It's not just here. In the UK, personal debt is rampant, and is leading to record numbers of collection from the high courts. China's economy is propped up on manufacturing and cheap labor that is not-so-subtly rumbling towards a higher standard of living and automation, combined with crushing levels of national debt to build their infrastructure. Housing costs in big cities the world over are out of control.

IMO we are just approaching the peak of the recovery from the 2008 crash. Spending and credit are widely available, unemployment is nearing record lows, and money is being invested wherever it will fit. Something will give, sooner or later.
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#14
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
In the Windows 8 days retail Home licenses was about €90 and OEM about €110. 'twas a good time and it is there they should be.
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#15
hat
Enthusiast
At least one can still grab super cheap keys online...
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#16
Vayra86
The gall, the timing... absurd
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#17
Salty_sandwich
im glad back when Microsoft was doing a day 1 upgrade deal to upgrade from windows 7 to windows 8 for I think it was £24 back then
so I bought 2 digital upgrade windows 8 licences for £48
then it was free upgrade to 8.1
then it was free upgrade to windows 10
so im more than happy I dumped windows 7 for windows 8 cheap offer upgrade, as it's led to free upgrade path all the way to windows 10 on two PC's
and for only £48 :)
glad I wasn't one of the anti windows 8 and at least gave it a chance which has paid of in the long run :)
love windows 10 best O/S in a long time

funny all those who lost data from not backing up are probs taking class action which Microsoft has off set any cost by upping the price of their software :)

thus new buyers of windows 10 pay for the mistake of others not backing up class LOL
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#18
silentbogo
It seems like "OS as a service" is on a backburner once again...
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#19
R0H1T
"Joss said:
It's called buying on credit, lessons haven't been learned. Wait for the next Lehman Moment, it'll be epic.
Trickle down economics, don't forget that.
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#20
StrayKAT
"jboydgolfer said:
windows 10 has been free (in some way or form) for years, anyone in a position of still needing a standalone key is a victim of poor planning. I must have accumulated 5 or 6 keys over these few years, since i knew eventually my kids who prefer win7 would need to upgrade sooner or later, as i would myself. I would imagine that it would be humiliating and infuriating to have to pay $100+ for a operating system, that was free for SO long. Maybe ill go through my Win10Pro licenses, see which ones arent activated , and make a nice profit :)
I bought Retail because OEM copies aren't as flexible across multiple hardware components.

I have a few "free" OEM keys, but they're worthless to me now.
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#22
Paganstomp
and in other news Ubuntu is still free!
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#23
Salty_sandwich
"Paganstomp said:
and in other news Ubuntu is still free!
mate the Linux crowd are understanding and patient type of person

could you imagine the whine'n that would be going on if everyone moved from Microsoft platform they moan hard enough about most Microsoft products they would murder unbuntu lol
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#24
StrayKAT
An OS on it's own isn't going to solve problems. What puts Windows over the top is the ecosystem (if you will). Until someone defeats that, then it's here to stay.
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#25
DeathtoGnomes
"StrayKAT said:
An OS on it's own isn't going to solve problems. What puts Windows over the top is the ecosystem (if you will). Until someone defeats that, then it's here to stay.
if by ecosystem, you actually mean bloatware, you are correct, its all uninstallable malware.
Posted on Reply
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