Tuesday, November 13th 2018

Intel Core X 9000-series Skylake-X Refresh Processors Formally Launched

Intel today formally launched its Core X 9000-series socket LGA2066 high-end desktop (HEDT) processors. Based on the same "Skylake-X" LCC and HCC dies as the Core X 7000-series, these processors are a minor refresh, in that Intel has bumped either the clock-speeds, or core-count, or L3 cache amount at existing price-points. The only physical difference between these chips and their "predecessors" is soldered integrated heatspreader, or STIM as Intel likes to call it. The processors are drop-in compatible with existing socket LGA2066 motherboards, although some boards may require BIOS updates. Many boards offer USB flash-back, a feature with which you can update the system BIOS even without any processor or memory installed.

With the introduction of 6-core and 8-core mainstream-desktop processors, Intel withdrew 6-core/12-thread for the LGA2066 platform. There is no more HEDT platform option under $500, such as the Core i7-7800X, or the smash-hit Core i7-920. The Core i7-9800X is an 8-core/16-thread chip clocked at 3.80 GHz nominal and 4.40 GHz boost, priced at $589. Its clock speeds may be lower than those of the i9-9900K, but it gives you quad-channel memory interface, 16.5 MB L3 cache (in addition to 1 MB L2 cache per core), and 44-lane PCIe interface. That's right, Intel learned from its blunder of stripping its sub-$1000 Core X processors of half their PCIe lanes, and now the entire lineup features the full 44-lane PCIe root complex, and quad-channel memory.

The Core i9 X-series lineup begins with the i9-9820X, priced at $889. This 10-core/20-thread chip features the same 16.5 MB L3 cache as the i7-9800X, and clock speeds of 3.30 GHz, with 4.10 GHz Turbo Boost. These specs make it similar to the i9-7900X. At $989 you get the Core i9-9900X. Much like the i9-9820X, this is a 10-core/20-thread chip. All that the extra $100 gets you is more L3 cache, at 19.25 MB, and higher clock speeds of 3.50 GHz base, with 4.40 GHz boost. All SKUs above the i9-9900X feature the same 19.25 MB of L3 cache.

The $1,189 Core i9-9920X is a 12-core/24-thread processor with the same clock speeds as the i9-9900X - 3.50 GHz base with 4.40 GHz boost. At $1,387, the Core i9-9940X is a 14-core/28-thread part clocked slightly lower, with 3.30 GHz base and 4.40 GHz boost. Intel's 16-core/32-thread option is priced close to double that of AMD's Threadripper 2950X, at $1,684, with the Core i9-9960X, clocked at 3.10 GHz based with 4.40 GHz boost. The flagship Core-branded part from Intel is the Core i9-9980XE, which is an 18-core/36-thread processor clocked at 3.00 GHz, with 4.40 GHz boost.

All SKUs feature Turbo Boost Max 3.0, an additional clock-speed boosting layer concentric to Turbo Boost, which rewards your processor with automated overclock to up to 4.50 GHz, if your cooling is up to the job. The TDP of all SKUs is rated at 165W, and the standard memory divided has been bumped to DDR4-2666.
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20 Comments on Intel Core X 9000-series Skylake-X Refresh Processors Formally Launched

#2
phanbuey
more cache... same stuff. Time to wait for zen 2
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#4
bonehead123
y
a
w
n.....

mo' same ole same same shitfully incrementally minor moolah-milkin changes yada yada yada :(
Posted on Reply
#5
cellar door
ROFL ...best part is that an i7 part(9800X) is more expensive then a i9 part(9900K). Intel smoking some good stuff!
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#7
kastriot
Making 2 different sockets for 99% same cpu-s just to enable stereo milking.
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#8
phanbuey
cellar door, post: 3941019, member: 159924"
ROFL ...best part is that an i7 part(9800X) is more expensive then a i9 part(9900K). Intel smoking some good stuff!
I know right? Who is the target market there? Current owners of 7280x/7900x? (No thank u)...

HEDT people who want to invest in a dead x299 socket with Zen2 on the horizon? Prolly not...

Gamers? Nope...

Basically current 7740x and 7800x owners, which is a teeny segment... Hopefully the prices drop dramatically.
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#9
Tomgang
There is not much exciment news here. Same core count ass last release, a bit higher clock speed and some other things. But the button end is...
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#10
DeathtoGnomes
the only minor refresh here is the escalation of the prices.
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#11
diatribe
GoldenX, post: 3940992, member: 160319"
So, nothing new.
There is a sub-$1,000 CPU with 44 PCIE lanes now. The Core i7-9800X at $589.
Posted on Reply
#12
GoldenX
diatribe, post: 3941083, member: 93915"
There is a sub-$1,000 CPU with 44 PCIE lanes now. The Core i7-9800X at $589.
Like it always should have been. No stupid dual channel quad core with 16 lines on an HEDT platform.
Or maybe you mean Threadripper, with 64 lines and more cores, for less money? Intel needs to start making something new, and it should be before Zen2 arrives. This was one hell of a missed opportunity.
Posted on Reply
#13
Chloe Price
GoldenX, post: 3940992, member: 160319"
So, nothing new.
I wouldn't say so, as the news article said, now you get full PCI-E lanes under 1000 usd.

cellar door, post: 3941019, member: 159924"
ROFL ...best part is that an i7 part(9800X) is more expensive then a i9 part(9900K). Intel smoking some good stuff!
And? That's just a damn branding.. Would you say the same, if the latter would be named i7-9900K?
Posted on Reply
#14
cellar door
Chloe Price, post: 3941247, member: 123719"
I wouldn't say so, as the news article said, now you get full PCI-E lanes under 1000 usd.


And? That's just a damn branding.. Would you say the same, if the latter would be named i7-9900K?
Call it i3 9800X then - since people like you would be ok with that. Since its just branding haha
Posted on Reply
#15
Chloe Price
cellar door, post: 3941265, member: 159924"
Call it i3 9800X then - since people like you would be ok with that. Since its just branding haha
If something has a stupid brand name, it's 9700K. An i7 without HT is just stupid.

But maybe Intel knows how to brand their processors, I guess..
Posted on Reply
#16
GoldenX
Disabling AVX and AVX2 for the lower end CPUs is also stupid, and no one complains about that. We could have an even bigger adoption of AVX, and thanks to Atom, Celeron and Pentium, we don't.
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#17
hat
Enthusiast
Too bad there's no cheaper, lower core count parts for HEDT anymore... but how many slammed Intel for those quad core HEDT chips? This move actually makes sense, with the advent of 6 or even 8 core mainstream chips... now if only they could fix the naming scheme.
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#18
hat
Enthusiast
Intel's naming scheme for anything outside the MSDT line is really convoluted. I was window shopping at Newegg and had to come back and dig this thread up to see if these chips were even available there (they're not). The HEDT line wasn't too bad, but this really doesn't help... and let's not even get into the mess that is server chips.
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#19
Xx Tek Tip xX
hat, post: 3941312, member: 32804"
but how many slammed Intel for those quad core HEDT chips?
Not me I own one :laugh:
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#20
Gasaraki
I want a review of the overclocking potential of the new i7-9800X. I am deciding between this or the i9-9900K. I know the architecture is faster for coffee lake in most current applications but if I can get the i7-9800X to 5.0GHz all cores, i'll rather have the lanes and the quad channel memory and future upgradability. Z390 is going to be stuck at 8-cores. (maybe) Stupid 10-core rumors.
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