Thursday, November 30th 2017

Core i9-9900K Achieves 5.50 GHz Overclock on a Z170 Chipset Motherboard

It is already established that the incompatibility between Intel's 8th and 9th generation Core socket LGA1151 processors and Intel's 100-series and 200-series chipset motherboards is artificial, and that with the right BIOS modding, you can get the newer processors to work on the older motherboards. Finnish overclocker "Luumi" made a video demonstration of an i9-9900K successfully overclocking to 5.50 GHz all-core on an ASRock Z170M OC Formula micro-ATX motherboard. The overclocked processor is CineBench and Prime95 stable.

Officially, Intel carved out the 300-series chipset platform to ensure its "Coffee Lake" 6-core processors are given motherboards with a sufficiently powerful VRM setup to keep up with the increased core-count, such as this motherboard with its astoundingly powerful VRM. Unofficially, it's believed Intel created the boundary between 300-series and older LGA1151 platforms, just so motherboard vendors are assured of selling new product lines every two generations of Intel processors. In contrast, AMD's AM4 platform already supports three generations of processors, and is scheduled to support future generations running up to 2020.
Lummi's video presentation follows.

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33 Comments on Core i9-9900K Achieves 5.50 GHz Overclock on a Z170 Chipset Motherboard

#1
lynx29
lol

I think Intel's main argument though was the power delivery was wrong, they admitted it could work on older chipsets, but long term quality of life could not be promised. So I mean, this article still is a moot point when you understand Intel's logic on it.

That being said, it's all dumb anyway. If I don't have Intel 10nm build PC by winter 2019 I am rage quitting, or 7nm vega 2 navi w.e its called doesn't even come close to 2080 ti... rage quits incoming, hobby is getting silly as crap.
Posted on Reply
#2
R0H1T
lynx29 said:
lol

I think Intel's main argument though was the power delivery was wrong, they admitted it could work on older chipsets, but long term quality of life could not be promised. So I mean, this article still is a moot point when you understand Intel's logic on it.

That being said, it's all dumb anyway. If I don't have Intel 10nm build PC by winter 2019 I am rage quitting, or 7nm vega 2 navi w.e its called doesn't even come close to 2080 ti... rage quits incoming, hobby is getting silly as crap.
This was established mid last year when an ASUS rep went on record to say that Z370 wasn't a necessity for hexa cores, same could be said about Z390. I think Intel likes its OCD wrt changing sockets, they simply can't help themselves :shadedshu:

Also they (Intel) didn't admit anything, like usual, it was ASUS.
Posted on Reply
#3
biffzinker
R0H1T said:
I think Intel likes its OCD wrt changing sockets, they simply can't help themselves :shadedshu:
Yor forgetting the additional chipset sales. So there is an incentive to change sockets.
Posted on Reply
#4
R0H1T
biffzinker said:
Yor forgetting the additional chipset sales. So there is an incentive to change sockets.
Not really, it's more about segmentation than anything else since Intel believes Z boards should always fetch a premium, even though we've seen tons with crappy VRM. Also with these "additional" chipsets they're eating into the already constrained 14nm capacity.
Posted on Reply
#5
kastriot
This was achieved on LN2 and 300W for current cpu?
Posted on Reply
#6
darksf
lynx29 said:
lol

I think Intel's main argument though was the power delivery was wrong, they admitted it could work on older chipsets, but long term quality of life could not be promised. So I mean, this article still is a moot point when you understand Intel's logic on it.

That being said, it's all dumb anyway. If I don't have Intel 10nm build PC by winter 2019 I am rage quitting, or 7nm vega 2 navi w.e its called doesn't even come close to 2080 ti... rage quits incoming, hobby is getting silly as crap.
Give me your money obviously is the only Intel argument. The rest of the fairy tells they tell are for little kids. Each Mobo has a CPU support list provided by the manufacturer of the Mobo both as a list and as BIOS support.So the Mobo manufacturer decides does this Mobo supports 35W or 125W CPU.
Posted on Reply
#7
Upgrayedd
Was wondering where the OC Formula has been for the 300-series.
Posted on Reply
#8
Luumi_
kastriot said:
This was achieved on LN2 and 300W for current cpu?
No, the cpu was cooled with water and was able to pass cinebench at 5.5 with very low voltage. Sadly I didnt have many motherboards to compare against.
Posted on Reply
#9
Vayra86
lynx29 said:
lol

I think Intel's main argument though was the power delivery was wrong, they admitted it could work on older chipsets, but long term quality of life could not be promised. So I mean, this article still is a moot point when you understand Intel's logic on it.

That being said, it's all dumb anyway. If I don't have Intel 10nm build PC by winter 2019 I am rage quitting, or 7nm vega 2 navi w.e its called doesn't even come close to 2080 ti... rage quits incoming, hobby is getting silly as crap.
There is also the option of just holding on to what you have and not jumping on every generation of chips, like I see so many people do. Its an illusion to think there is a real meaningful upgrade every other year. Why would there be, if you've already shot for the high end earlier? The higher you aim, the less there is to gain.

People need to chill the f out. Its obviously a bad time for hardware, most notably GPU. I think CPU is actually in a fantastic place right now and DDR is getting to manageable levels. Storage has progressively become cheaper over the last five years, and the content has diversified in a great way. You may not like all of it, but the state of this market is more healthy and alive than it'll ever be - again, except for GPU.
Posted on Reply
#10
Basard
btarunr said:
such as this motherboard with its astoundingly powerful VRM.
Is the right link posted, or is this a jab at the motherboard?
Posted on Reply
#11
Darmok N Jalad
I certainly have my doubts that many older motherboards couldn’t power the 9-series. Many enthusiast motherboards are overbuilt to say the least, and hex-core Intel CPUs have been around since the 32nm Westmere. Would every old motherboard be able to make it? Maybe not, but there has always been some segmentation in motherboard CPU compatibly, and that gets worked out with BIOS updates and compatibility lists. Intel could have let the motherboard OEMs make the call on support. Intel used to change the pin count on the socket when the support boundary was so clear, but they didn’t even bother to do that this time.
Posted on Reply
#12
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
Darmok N Jalad said:
I certainly have my doubts that many older motherboards couldn’t power the 9-series. Many enthusiast motherboards are overbuilt to say the least, and hex-core Intel CPUs have been around since the 32nm Westmere.
It has nothing to do with how overbuilt the motherboards are. The issue is the number of pins providing power to the CPU, that doesn't change no matter how well built the motherboard is. The fact is Intel has had issues with the sockets straight up melting because of too much current flowing through too few pins, and they aren't willing to make that mistake again. So they differentiate between boards that support the new CPU and those that don't by changing the chipset number.

The funny thing is, if they had just changed the socket number, added one extra pin and called it 1152, no one would have batted an eye on the whole situation.
Posted on Reply
#13
phill
I love my Z170M OCF :) Thankfully it is modded and will take a 9900k :) Sadly though, I won't be buying one due to the sheer cost of them! :laugh:
Posted on Reply
#14
Dave65
lynx29 said:
lol

I think Intel's main argument though was the power delivery was wrong, they admitted it could work on older chipsets, but long term quality of life could not be promised. So I mean, this article still is a moot point when you understand Intel's logic on it.

That being said, it's all dumb anyway. If I don't have Intel 10nm build PC by winter 2019 I am rage quitting, or 7nm vega 2 navi w.e its called doesn't even come close to 2080 ti... rage quits incoming, hobby is getting silly as crap.
Intel would never lie.. Would they?
:):):)
Posted on Reply
#15
Claudio
Luumi_ said:
No, the cpu was cooled with water and was able to pass cinebench at 5.5 with very low voltage. Sadly I didnt have many motherboards to compare against.
Congratulations, yours CPU it's very selected...
Posted on Reply
#16
mouacyk
That right there is enthusiast quality... against all odds, including hex-editing BIOSes.
Posted on Reply
#17
champsilva
lynx29 said:
lol

I think Intel's main argument though was the power delivery was wrong, they admitted it could work on older chipsets, but long term quality of life could not be promised. So I mean, this article still is a moot point when you understand Intel's logic on it.

That being said, it's all dumb anyway. If I don't have Intel 10nm build PC by winter 2019 I am rage quitting, or 7nm vega 2 navi w.e its called doesn't even come close to 2080 ti... rage quits incoming, hobby is getting silly as crap.
The only issue is, this is a TOP z170 made for extreme overclocking, some cheap Z170 boards. would have issues, almost 100% sure.
Posted on Reply
#18
SpartanM07
champsilva said:
The only issue is, this is a TOP z170 made for extreme overclocking, some cheap Z170 boards. would have issues, almost 100% sure.
Haha, so 99.9% sure then?
Posted on Reply
#20
ArbitraryAffection
lynx29 said:
lol

I think Intel's main argument though was the power delivery was wrong, they admitted it could work on older chipsets, but long term quality of life could not be promised. So I mean, this article still is a moot point when you understand Intel's logic on it.

That being said, it's all dumb anyway. If I don't have Intel 10nm build PC by winter 2019 I am rage quitting, or 7nm vega 2 navi w.e its called doesn't even come close to 2080 ti... rage quits incoming, hobby is getting silly as crap.
Lol, bye then!

I'll be enjoying my 7nm Ryzen 3000 series with superior performance and efficiency while you quit building high-end PCs because Intel done goofed.
Posted on Reply
#21
lynx29
ArbitraryAffection said:
Lol, bye then!

I'll be enjoying my 7nm Ryzen 3000 series with superior performance and efficiency while you quit building high-end PCs because Intel done goofed.
oh I might go 7nm ryzen as well, it all depends on benches when 10nm and 7nm Fall 2019 hit.

currently Intel 9900k gets 30 fps higher at 1080p over ryzen (and I own 3 monitors, 1 4k, 1 240hz 1080p, and 1 1440p 165hz) so that extra 30 is nice for competitive shooters at 240hz. also intel gets 10 fps higher min refresh better in games across the board with 9900k vs 2700x = smoother overall gameplay, though I admit at higher refresh you can't notice, but at 4k 60hz, 7 fps on a dip, however quick it may be, is noticeable in games.

so enjoy your inferior gaming experience, or wait for benches! :)
Posted on Reply
#22
TheGuruStud
lynx29 said:
oh I might go 7nm ryzen as well, it all depends on benches when 10nm and 7nm Fall 2019 hit.

currently Intel 9900k gets 30 fps higher at 1080p over ryzen (and I own 3 monitors, 1 4k, 1 240hz 1080p, and 1 1440p 165hz) so that extra 30 is nice for competitive shooters at 240hz. also intel gets 10 fps higher min refresh better in games across the board with 9900k vs 2700x = smoother overall gameplay, though I admit at higher refresh you can't notice, but at 4k 60hz, 7 fps on a dip, however quick it may be, is noticeable in games.

so enjoy your inferior gaming experience, or wait for benches! :)
There is no 10nm intel coming for desktop anytime soon. End of 2020 maybe lol
Posted on Reply
#23
lynx29
TheGuruStud said:
There is no 10nm intel coming for desktop anytime soon. End of 2020 maybe lol
winter 2019 i bet they have it by then, but you might be right. we will see
Posted on Reply
#24
jboydgolfer
i guess i should be glad i was able to hit 5.3Ghz so easily on my 8600k. Of course its different CPU's....but if a guy THIS serious about OC is hitting 5.3, im happy with it.
Posted on Reply
#25
MrGenius
Basard said:
Is the right link posted, or is this a jab at the motherboard?
I think it's meant to be a jab at the motherboard. Though it's a big fat swing and a miss IMO. Considering the H310 chipset doesn't support overclocking. And, as such, that VRM is probably "sufficiently powerful" to run any "Coffee Lake" CPU @ stock without issues.
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