Tuesday, February 26th 2019

ENERMAX Intros REVOLUTION D.F. 80PLUS Gold Certified PSU with DFR Tech

ENERMAX, a leading designer and manufacturer of high-performance PC hardware products, introduces a new full modular power supply series, REVOLUTION D.F. With 80PLUS Gold certification, REVOLUTION D.F. provides stable and high efficiency performance during operation. The exclusive D.F. switch, which applies the patented Dust Free Rotation technology, allows users to activate the self-cleaning function anytime they desire. Furthermore, the unique Smart Airflow Control design with patented Twister Bearing fan delivers an almost inaudible operation within 70% system load. REVOLUTION D.F. series is surely a perfect match for the mainstream gaming rigs and multimedia workstations.

REVOLUTION D.F. series is engineered with several modern features, including the exclusive D.F. switch, DC to DC converter circuit, and 100% 105°C Japanese electrolytic capacitors, to make the 80 PLUS Gold Certified PSU more stable and durable than its peers. Adopting the patented Dust Free Rotation tech, the D.F. switch enables users to activate the self-cleaning function to blow away the accumulated dust by simply pushing the button anytime during operation.
Intelligent SAC Design with Patented Twister Bearing Fan for a Nearly Inaudible Environment
To deliver more silent operation, REVOLUTION D.F. power supply is built with the Smart Airflow Control design, which has the PSU fan spinning at nearly inaudible 400RPM before reaching 70% workload. Furthermore, featuring the patented Twister Bearing technology, the 13.9 cm PSU fan ensures silent spinning and the long lifetime of fan (160,000 hours MTBF). The full modular REVOLUTION D.F. series with 100% flat cables can help make better cable management and minimize cable clutter.

REVOLUTION D.F. series comes in 3 different wattage options: 650W, 750W and 850W; the lineup will be available at retail in early March of 2019.

For more information, visit the product page.
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5 Comments on ENERMAX Intros REVOLUTION D.F. 80PLUS Gold Certified PSU with DFR Tech

#1
bonehead123
Nice PSU, but the price will determine it's sucess or failure, since it has some good features and includes all the normal stuff that others do.

My question is why they can't make the AC power cords flat (with flat, angled plugs), like the interconnect cables ?

They do exist, as I have them all over my house, so it's not like they would have to "reinvent the wheel" :D
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#2
TheLostSwede
bonehead123, post: 4002206, member: 139670"
Nice PSU, but the price will determine it's sucess or failure, since it has some good features and includes all the normal stuff that others do.

My question is why they can't make the AC power cords flat (with flat, angled plugs), like the interconnect cables ?

They do exist, as I have them all over my house, so it's not like they would have to "reinvent the wheel" :D
Because industry standards? The plug on the PSUs is a very standard connector, so there's no way any PSU maker would go and change that, as the certification cost alone of a custom socket+plug would be insane money to spend.
These are the standards used - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEC_60320
PC power supplies tend to use C13/14, with really high current units use the C19/20.

Flat cable, maybe, but such a cable might not be able to carry as high current, which is also an issue with going with a different plug. The C5/6 type plug which is found on quite a lot of laptop power bricks, can only carry 2.5A for example, whereas the C13/14 can carry 10A.
Posted on Reply
#4
diatribe
BakerMan1971, post: 4002274, member: 183184"
SuperFlower OEM?
That's a fair guess, but I would like to know for sure.
Posted on Reply
#5
bonehead123
TheLostSwede, post: 4002237, member: 3382"
Because industry standards? The plug on the PSUs is a very standard connector, so there's no way any PSU maker would go and change that, as the certification cost alone of a custom socket+plug would be insane money to spend.
These are the standards used - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/IEC_60320
PC power supplies tend to use C13/14, with really high current units use the C19/20.

Flat cable, maybe, but such a cable might not be able to carry as high current, which is also an issue with going with a different plug. The C5/6 type plug which is found on quite a lot of laptop power bricks, can only carry 2.5A for example, whereas the C13/14 can carry 10A.
Well, the folks that make power cords for home/office use would tend to disagree with you, as I said, I have the flat plugs all over my house and have not had any problems whatsoever with them being able to carry the current for which they were designed for (120v/20-30amps), including some that are on 150ft, heavy-duty extension cords...

And yes I am quite aware of the IEC standards and specs, as I have worked with commercial & industrial power distribution for many years, which was partly why I posed the question.

Also, exactly where/when/why did laptop power bricks enter this discussion ? 2.5A is miniscule amount of current compared to almost any other type of electrical component, plug or cable.....
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