Tuesday, May 21st 2019

U.S. Dept of Commerce Gives Huawei a 90-day Waiver to Wrap Up its Affairs

The United States Department of Commerce granted Huawei a 90-day respite in the form of a waiver, from the Bureau of Industry and Security's list of entities American businesses cannot trade with. Huawei shook the tech world last weekend, when it found itself banned by the Department of Commerce. Called TGL, or Temporary General License, with a defined lifespan of 90 days following 20th May, the TGL "grants operators time to make other arrangements and the Department space to determine the appropriate long term measures for Americans and foreign telecommunications providers that currently rely on Huawei equipment for critical services," said Secretary of Commerce Wilbur Ross.

"In short, this license will allow operations to continue for existing Huawei mobile phone users and rural broadband networks," he added. The 90-day period blunts the abrupt nature of the ban, giving U.S. businesses time to make alternative business plans with other partners. It also gives Huawei time to wrap up its affairs by seeking out dues from U.S. businesses, clearing out its dues to U.S. businesses, and lawfully exiting the U.S. market.
Source: United States Department of Commerce
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25 Comments on U.S. Dept of Commerce Gives Huawei a 90-day Waiver to Wrap Up its Affairs

#1
Jozsef Dornyei
Somebody just realised that he shoot himself in the foot. I hope there will be some kind of an agreement. For example Huawei pulling out of 5G export and in return this ban is canned for good.
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#2
Vayra86
Jozsef Dornyei, post: 4051297, member: 172722"
Somebody just realised that he shoot himself in the foot. I hope there will be some kind of an agreement. For example Huawei pulling out of 5G export and in return this ban is canned for good.
You don't seriously think the US just realized this after the ban, right?

This is psychological, geopolitical warfare. Take note as well, of China's silence at this point. They were taken by surprise.
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#3
samuel isaac
lol " Huawei shook the tech world last weekend, when it found itself banned by the Department of Commerce " , why not the department of commerce shocked the world . that's like the victim shocked the world by being stabbed by the criminal . XD
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#4
SoNic67
Or like the thief being shoot in the middle of the heist... Now on hospital bed, for 90 days, to mend his wounds before he can be taken to the jail.
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#5
DeathtoGnomes
dont really see why 90 days is needed when 30 or 45 would do.
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#6
Divide Overflow
samuel isaac, post: 4051373, member: 187829"
lol " Huawei shook the tech world last weekend, when it found itself banned by the Department of Commerce " , why not the department of commerce shocked the world . that's like the victim shocked the world by being stabbed by the criminal . XD
Except Huawei *is* the suspect.
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#7
chaosmassive
USA logic= "if you cant beat them, ban them"
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#8
Countryside
US is terrified of Huawei controlling 5G networks
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#9
Mistral
chaosmassive, post: 4051491, member: 159641"
USA logic= "if you cant beat them, ban them"
Are you implying that Huawei is playing by the rules?
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#10
xkm1948
Mistral, post: 4051552, member: 49446"
Are you implying that Huawei is playing by the rules?
nobody ever is. get off your high horse. in the international relationship, power is everything.
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#11
hardcore_gamer
chaosmassive, post: 4051491, member: 159641"
USA logic= "if you cant beat them, ban them"
Perfect answer to "if you can't beat them, steal their technology"
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#12
Vayra86
DeathtoGnomes, post: 4051397, member: 151150"
dont really see why 90 days is needed when 30 or 45 would do.
Payments. Many invoices are scaled to a 90 day period, many financial systems work with 90 day periods. In many terms of use you can face definitive measures if you're behind 90 days on payment. Its a bit of a standard period for many companies wrt handling financials. It also allows time for hired goods and real estate to be handed back in a normal fashion, 30 or 45 days is way too short for that, You need at least one full monthly term and even that is pushing it.

Its practical for all parties involved.
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#13
dozenfury
Keep in mind the gov't isn't as clueless as people seem to think. It's not that they didn't know some US companies sold to Huawei. What the US is saying is that we know the Chinese government is using Huawei to spy on US interests from commercial to military and everything in-between with the primary goal of IP theft, and the cost to letting that continue far exceeds any short-term cost. And having seen companies shut down after IP theft and hundreds of workers put out of work, while the Chinese company gets off without penalty and profits by selling cheaper versions of stolen products, I don't see a problem with enduring the short-term pain. This is state-sponsored large scale IP theft industry by industry. If it costs AMD $30M in the short-term, so be it. Better than Huawei stealing their chip IP, building their chips at half the cost, and then running AMD out of business and putting all of their workers out of work. The larger issue to me is that so many people don't realize that is happening, it's like death by a thousand cuts.
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#14
R-T-B
samuel isaac, post: 4051373, member: 187829"
lol " Huawei shook the tech world last weekend, when it found itself banned by the Department of Commerce " , why not the department of commerce shocked the world . that's like the victim shocked the world by being stabbed by the criminal . XD
I agree. The wording is odd. And that's even with me suspecting Huwei's guilt at this point. They still did not do the "world shaking." That lies solely with the USA. Whether or not it was right we can only speculate and guess.

hardcore_gamer, post: 4051588, member: 92204"
Perfect answer to "if you can't beat them, steal their technology"
I keep hearing this but I've yet to see any evidence Huwei actually stole anything. This seems more like spycraft concerns, like spying via the hardware they deploy. Don't assume just because they are a Chinese company they are thieves. That's... a pretty blanket assumption, and borderline Sinophobic.
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#15
moproblems99
R-T-B, post: 4051788, member: 41983"
I keep hearing this but I've yet to see any evidence Huwei actually stole anything. This seems more like spycraft concerns, like spying via the hardware they deploy. Don't assume just because they are a Chinese company they are thieves. That's... a pretty blanket assumption, and borderline Sinophobic.
I'm guessing that the thinking involved is because most companies have some form of state 'ownership' there that the blanket does somewhat apply.
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#16
Bones
Vayra86, post: 4051334, member: 152404"
You don't seriously think the US just realized this after the ban, right?

This is psychological, geopolitical warfare. Take note as well, of China's silence at this point. They were taken by surprise.
Thing is the Chinese are well known to do it and it's proven they do such through various means including what was stated as the reasons for the ban and it's not just the U.S. they do it do.
The so-called "Shock" or suprise of it is in fact a good thing since the Chinese didn't believe it would happen, hence the suprise part of it.... And sometimes such a suprise is a good thing.

I'm not saying they are the only ones doing such since it's just fact everyone does it to various extents to each other. In this case it's either do something about it yourself or continue letting it happen or else, and I can promise you no one else will step in and solve it for us either - Up to us for doing that in those terms.

China has factually proven with it's actions in the past it's an aggressive minded society in terms of economics, tech, military and all else you can think about and they have been taking steps on all these fronts to push things to their advantage.
Don't expect them to stop and play nice on their own because they won't, only a fool would expect such.
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#17
remixedcat
Countryside, post: 4051499, member: 131094"
US is terrified of Huawei controlling 5G networks
As it should be. I never trusted them They steal lot of IP including tons of Cisco's and a few media codec stuff as well. Also the spying crap as well.
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#18
king of swag187
Surprised it didn't happen sooner, now does feel right I guess.
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#19
Esse
remixedcat, post: 4051823, member: 84450"
As it should be. I never trusted them They steal lot of IP including tons of Cisco's and a few media codec stuff as well. Also the spying crap as well.
Then Cisco shouldn't have sold manufacturing to the lowest bidder.

If the US displays itself like this then why start business/tech in America? None of the companies wanted to ban Huawei but US government ordered them to. To me it sounds like setting up business overseas is a better idea. Less likely to kill your profits.
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#20
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
DeathtoGnomes, post: 4051397, member: 151150"
dont really see why 90 days is needed when 30 or 45 would do.
A quarter...so all corporations can get their shit together. Most didn't budget to replace Huawei routers, for example, so they can add that to the budget for the next quarter to soften the blow.
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#21
remixedcat
Esse, post: 4051946, member: 48064"
Then Cisco shouldn't have sold manufacturing to the lowest bidder.

If the US displays itself like this then why start business/tech in America? None of the companies wanted to ban Huawei but US government ordered them to. To me it sounds like setting up business overseas is a better idea. Less likely to kill your profits.
Hawei didn't make any of Cisco's stuff... They just flat out stole the router os and branded it as their own... Twice!!

Hawei got away with it because the us politicians are bought by the chinise.. Trump is putting a stop to that.
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#22
Patriot
People forget that:
A. in China there is only 1 firewall, whether a company is actively spying or not, any data that enters China, the Chinese government has access to.
B. IP theft in China is not viewed as theft but as iterative development and is actively encouraged.
C. You do what the government tells you or they just take all your stuff. (aka leave those routers unpatched, we like that security hole)
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#25
lexluthermiester
Vayra86, post: 4051334, member: 152404"
This is psychological, geopolitical warfare.
True
Vayra86, post: 4051334, member: 152404"
Take note as well, of China's silence at this point. They were taken by surprise.
Oh no they weren't.

samuel isaac, post: 4051373, member: 187829"
lol " Huawei shook the tech world last weekend, when it found itself banned by the Department of Commerce " , why not the department of commerce shocked the world . that's like the victim shocked the world by being stabbed by the criminal . XD
One could argue that because they did this to themselves that they did in fact shock the world by getting banned.
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