Monday, May 27th 2019

AMD "Raven Ridge" and "Summit Ridge" CPUs Won't Work on X570 Chipset

If you own an AMD 300-series motherboard and are looking to upgrade to Zen 2-based Ryzen 3000 series processors, you have nothing to worry about, as long as your motherboard vendor puts out a BIOS update that adds compatibility (most vendors already have). If you belong to the demographic which has a 1st generation Ryzen "Summit Ridge" processor or Ryzen 2000 "Raven Ridge" APU laying around and looking to buy an AMD X570 motherboard, we have some bad news for you.

AMD X570 apparently only supports 2nd generation Ryzen "Pinnacle Ridge" processors among the previous generations. The chart below indicates compatibility. It says that while AMD 300-series and 400-series chipsets very much do support the latest Ryzen 3000 series processors launched today, the new X570 chipset only supports "Pinnacle Ridge" processors from the previous generation, besides the latest "Matisse" processors (and the upcoming "Picasso" APUs). 400-series chipsets have the best compatibility. They support every AM4 processor launched so far.
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20 Comments on AMD "Raven Ridge" and "Summit Ridge" CPUs Won't Work on X570 Chipset

#1
ZoneDymo
weird, wonder what the problem is for this, I think in 99.9% of the cases it wont matter but still.
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#2
Xuper
maybe AIB Vendors ask AMD not to put ? perhaps they(Mobo maker) wanted to get rid of APU ?
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#3
Chomiq
Xuper, post: 4054918, member: 83814"
maybe AIB Vendors ask AMD not to put ? perhaps they(Mobo maker) wanted to get rid of APU ?
APUs are there to stay.
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#4
Valantar
This isn't about APUs, Summit Ridge is 1st-gen Ryzen CPUs. It's about 1st-gen not being supported for some odd reason. Kind of weird, but I doubt it matters much for most people (outside of those buying a motherboard while saving up for a CPU or something like that, or for troubleshooting issues with a second CPU - not exactly common scenarios).
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#5
Ferrum Master
ZoneDymo, post: 4054910, member: 66089"
weird, wonder what the problem is for this, I think in 99.9% of the cases it wont matter but still.
My bet it is the new south bridge lacks some clock generator or specific mode for the APU GPU part. Due to some erratas some internal clock gens are often switched off and ability to feed external is always preserved. But the bridge is new and they cannot patch it as previously.
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#6
HD64G
How many will keep the 1st gen Ryzen and will upgrade the motherboard when the main incentive to this are the Zen2 CPUs? Imho, not any serious problem with that restriction. The upgradeability AMD declared with the Zen CPUs means that the 1st gen's motherboards will work with the CPUs they will bring out in 2020. And they did so with a few exception that depend on the quality of the vendors making the motherboards and their greediness if they do not update the BIOS in any mtherboard able to work with the new CPUs.
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#7
GoldenX
I have a friend who went for an A320 to keep using a PCI sound card... This will not make him happy.
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#8
B-Real
HD64G, post: 4055170, member: 95052"
How many will keep the 1st gen Ryzen and will upgrade the motherboard when the main incentive to this are the Zen2 CPUs? Imho, not any serious problem with that restriction. The upgradeability AMD declared with the Zen CPUs means that the 1st gen's motherboards will work with the CPUs they will bring out in 2020. And they did so with a few exception that depend on the quality of the vendors making the motherboards and their greediness if they do not update the BIOS in any mtherboard able to work with the new CPUs.
h
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#9
HD64G
GoldenX, post: 4055177, member: 160319"
I have a friend who went for an A320 to keep using a PCI sound card... This will not make him happy.
Me thinks that If one needs someting so obsolete as a PCI soundcard, he won't miss a Zen2 CPU if he can get a very powerful and fast 2700X for example.
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#10
djisas
I'd love a new MB with an old school PCi port, hard to get rid of a 200$ sound card that when it finally gets along with windows 10, works wonders...
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#11
GoldenX
HD64G, post: 4055221, member: 95052"
Me thinks that If one needs someting so obsolete as a PCI soundcard, he won't miss a Zen2 CPU if he can get a very powerful and fast 2700X for example.
Well, at the very least he can use 3000 series APUs.
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#12
medi01
So, while they are forward compatible, new mainboards lack backward compatibility, pre-order canceled.
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#13
HD64G
medi01, post: 4055365, member: 158537"
So, while they are forward compatible, new mainboards lack backward compatibility, pre-order canceled.
Since you don't own any Ryzen cpu according to your system specs what this news has to do with you and why you thought a preorder of an X570 mobo? Enlighten me please, or stop trolling.
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#14
Aerpoweron
medi01 i think pre-ordering is always a bad idea. And where did you pre-order a mainboard?

What scenario are you thinking off, that downward compatibilty matters for you? I only can think of testing if your CPU is faulty and you only have a first gen Ryzen at hand. And you might get one on loan from AMD if you ask them. They did it that way, so you could do a Bios Update to get the Ryzen 2400 and 2200 working.

HD64G we don't know what computers medi01 has except for the i5 750 which is labeled as a all round PC.

What i am really interested in is on how many 300 and 400 series mainboards you will have PCI-E 4.0 on the PCI-E slots connected to the CPU. Maybe even on one NVME M.2 SSD. :)
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#15
medi01
@HD64G @Aerpoweron
It was sarcasm.
Given what competitor is doing, I find standards to which AMD is being held ridiculous.
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#16
danbert2000
I would bet that this is more down to AMD not wanting to have to qualify their new, in-house chipset with obsolete processors. Testing for old processors would take a lot of time and money for a feature that realistically no one is going to use. Why would you buy a fancy X570 motherboard and then plop in a two-generation-old processor? Reaching back one generation makes sense, somewhat. Maybe people want to grab some processor deals when the 3000 series pushes 2700X prices down but still get a motherboard that will support the latest and greatest features. But the 1800X's that are on sale are $200, and for that you can get a 3600 that is faster anyway.

I think it's totally fine for AMD to do this to reduce testing or just to reduce competition in their own product stacks. Intel motherboards are never backwards compatible more than one generation. And they are only forward compatible one generation, or none depending on when the new chipset comes out. AMD is at least supporting X370 in some fashion. They made promises about the motherboards being forward compatible, not the processors. If you buy an X570, you should be getting a 3000 series processor anyway. If you really need Ryzen 1st gen support, just buy an X470.
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#17
jabbadap
What no love for Bristol Ridge, that little poor bastard which no one loved.

danbert2000, post: 4055933, member: 165365"
I would bet that this is more down to AMD not wanting to have to qualify their new, in-house chipset with obsolete processors. Testing for old processors would take a lot of time and money for a feature that realistically no one is going to use. Why would you buy a fancy X570 motherboard and then plop in a two-generation-old processor? Reaching back one generation makes sense, somewhat. Maybe people want to grab some processor deals when the 3000 series pushes 2700X prices down but still get a motherboard that will support the latest and greatest features. But the 1800X's that are on sale are $200, and for that you can get a 3600 that is faster anyway.

I think it's totally fine for AMD to do this to reduce testing or just to reduce competition in their own product stacks. Intel motherboards are never backwards compatible more than one generation. And they are only forward compatible one generation, or none depending on when the new chipset comes out. AMD is at least supporting X370 in some fashion. They made promises about the motherboards being forward compatible, not the processors. If you buy an X570, you should be getting a 3000 series processor anyway. If you really need Ryzen 1st gen support, just buy an X470.
Well only real gripe from this is that: Processors lasts longer than motherboards, when final 400 -series motherboard EOL you start to loose possibility find good replacement board for your probably perfectly fine processor(A bit like old Nahelem/sandy/ivy intel owners today).
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#18
danbert2000
jabbadap, post: 4055938, member: 148195"
What no love for Bristol Ridge, that little poor bastard which no one loved.



Well only real gripe from this is that: Processors lasts longer than motherboards, when final 400 -series motherboard EOL you start to loose possibility find good replacement board for your probably perfectly fine processor(A bit like old Nahelem/sandy/ivy intel owners today).
I was under the impression that the Sandy/Ivy boards were dying due to the bad capacitors that were being used during that time, along with power supplies that had more ripple back in the day. In my opinion, when the motherboard goes, it almost always makes sense to upgrade your computer. Even if you have to stick to budget parts, you'll probably come out ahead in performance.
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#19
jabbadap
danbert2000, post: 4055972, member: 165365"
I was under the impression that the Sandy/Ivy boards were dying due to the bad capacitors that were being used during that time, along with power supplies that had more ripple back in the day. In my opinion, when the motherboard goes, it almost always makes sense to upgrade your computer. Even if you have to stick to budget parts, you'll probably come out ahead in performance.
...Which just underlines how non-issue this really is.

Well to be fair, it's AM4 -socket motherboard so there should not be reason other than software why you could not put some of the am4 -socket processors on it.
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#20
xorbe
All I can think of is that it simplifies bios qualifications going forward, and frees up rom space.
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