Friday, August 2nd 2019

EK Releases EK-Leak Tester - a Superior Leak Testing Solution

EK the premium liquid cooling gear manufacturer is releasing the EK-Leak Tester. A fast and safe way of testing for possible leaks in your liquid cooling loop. While traditional leak testing works, it requires hours before very small leaks are detected and then things can get messy. The EK-Leak Tester does the job way better!

The main body is a solid piece of CNC machined aluminium. One end is fitted with a revolvable male G1/4" connection port so it can be directly screwed onto any standard port in your liquid cooling loop. The gauge is custom made for liquid cooling loop testing purposes, which clearly marks the safe pressure for testing. The other side of the tester is hooked up with a valve that will make sure no air is escaping through the tester unit. The small pump for pressurizing the loop is also included. However, for a maximum safety effect, EK suggests reaching a pressure you want for testing and leaving the tester on for at least 15 minutes. If no pressure drop occurs and the gauge remains on the same spot, you're good to go.
In order to prevent damage of your liquid cooling loop, keep the pressure in the predefined zone only, as marked on the gauge. Please read the user manual before using the EK-Leak Tester!

The EK-Leak Tester is assembled in Slovenia, Europe and it is readily available for purchase through the EK Webshop and Partner Reseller Network for the manufacturer suggested retail price (MSRP) of 34.90€ with VAT included.
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34 Comments on EK Releases EK-Leak Tester - a Superior Leak Testing Solution

#2
Steevo
We use this kind of thing to test cooling systems and refrigerant systems. Air has a lower viscosity than coolant so any leak will show up sooner with a gas than liquid.
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#3
infrared
I've been using one of these for a while from a different brand, very handy bits of kit.
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#4
jsfitz54
Same way a mechanic can pressure test an automobile radiator and cooling system.

Today the wheel was reinvented! Oh wait...:rolleyes:
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#5
EarthDog
infrared, post: 4091417, member: 12770"
I've been using one of these for a while from a different brand, very handy bits of kit.
I had no idea another existed!

jsfitz54, post: 4091418, member: 85467"
Same way a mechanic can pressure test an automobile radiator and cooling system.

Today the wheel was reinvented! Oh wait...:rolleyes:
Fitzy pounding on the haterade this morning! lol

It's just another tool. They never said it was the first, or anything like that. But it is just applied to our hobby in a plug and play manner. ;)
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#6
Avlin
Did WC for years with different brands/grade parts, never had any issue or leaks. Also I did use tap waters for years, no any issues so far lol, every 3 years complete dismounting with vinegar cleanup, that's it.

And yes in 2005 I already had an RGB power supply...
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#7
Vario
Nice looking device. Good to see this type of pro hobbyist device filter into a more consumer friendly option. Looks like a must have piece of kit.
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#8
jsfitz54
EarthDog, post: 4091428, member: 79836"
I had no idea another existed!

Fitzy pounding on the haterade this morning! lol

It's just another tool. They never said it was the first, or anything like that. But it is just applied to our hobby in a plug and play manner. ;)
Not hating, a tool is a tool, but what's that measurement in bar's, shouldn't that be in #lbs?

What... no love.:)
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#9
v12dock
I'm pretty sure you could make one these from parts at a hardware store for $10.
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#10
TheDeeGee
I will never need that on my Noctua NH-D15S, even if the fans fail it will still do a good job cooling.
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#11
EarthDog
jsfitz54, post: 4091464, member: 85467"
Not hating, a tool is a tool, but what's that measurement in bar's, shouldn't that be in #lbs?

What... no love.:)
PSI? Maybe... but EK is a European company. They use the term bar for pressure (its metric).

No love for the haters, no. :D
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#12
jsfitz54
EarthDog, post: 4091499, member: 79836"
PSI? Maybe... but EK is a European company. They use the term bar for pressure (its metric)
PSI = (lbs) Pounds per square inch. 1 bar = 14.5037738 PSI.
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#13
EarthDog
jsfitz54, post: 4091515, member: 85467"
PSI = (lbs) Pounds per square inch. 1 bar = 14.5037738 PSI.
Well aware what PSI stands for and how much a 'bar' is to PSI. ty though. :)
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#14
jsfitz54
EarthDog, post: 4091516, member: 79836"
Well aware what PSI stands for and how much a 'bar' is to PSI. ty though. :)
Only putting it out there because you questioned my use of lbs. (you wrote, "PSI?" )

When was the last time you used "bar" to inflate your tires?

European system would be hard to convert to say 35 PSI for car tires in dial format.

SO , EK needs to to make a dial that appeals to other standards, IMHO.
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#15
infrared
EarthDog, post: 4091428, member: 79836"
I had no idea another existed!
Indeed, made by aquacomputer. My first experience with it wasn't great, I think it must have been assembled on a friday night because neither the valve or the gauge were tightened. The first time I used it I was hunting around for ages trying to find what i thought was a fairly substantial leak only to realize it was the leak tester itself!! :banghead:. Since then it's been a really useful tool though.

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#16
jsfitz54
infrared, post: 4091526, member: 12770"
Indeed, made by aquacomputer. My first experience with it wasn't great, I think it must have been assembled on a friday night because neither the valve or the gauge were tightened. The first time I used it I was hunting around for ages trying to find what i thought was a fairly substantial leak only to realize it was the leak tester itself!! :banghead:. Since then it's been a really useful tool though.

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These dials should be mineral oil filled.
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#17
EarthDog
jsfitz54, post: 4091523, member: 85467"
Only putting it out there because you questioned my use of lbs. (you wrote, "PSI?" )

When was the last time you used "bar" to inflate your tires?

European system would be hard to convert to say 35 PSI for car tires in dial format.

SO , EK needs to to make a dial that appeals to other standards, IMHO.
I mean you hated on this thing for no reason so who knew just lbs meant PSI? :p

On a more serious note, I see your point about bar/psi... but the reality is that is totally irrelevant to know exactly what bar/PSI its at... just use the green like they say. But again, its a Euro company, so it makes complete sense. :)

Truth be told, we in the US should convert to metric as it really is a lot easier than the imperial numbering we use. :)

... I digress.
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#18
infrared
jsfitz54, post: 4091535, member: 85467"
These dials should be mineral oil filled.
That's normally on industrial stuff to dampen vibration.. no vibration in this use case so no point in oil filling them
edit - plus that adds to the expense, and these are just cheapo air guages that go to 8psi. Far from being anything special.
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#19
John Naylor
On a rigid tube build, I'd suggest flushing the loop of crud 1st and wetting the O-Rings ... dry O-rings may show a leak whereby once wetted, no leak
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#20
jsfitz54
infrared, post: 4091539, member: 12770"
these are just cheapo air guages that go to 8psi. Far from being anything special.
That kind of makes my point.
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#21
nickbaldwin86
a tube and blowing into it as hard as humanly possible.

Been doing it for years and have build half dozen systems that way and has always work. Far cheaper solution.

it is a cool gadget though

If you build systems a LOT it would be a nice to have
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#22
infrared
jsfitz54, post: 4091548, member: 85467"
That kind of makes my point.
Ok, but can you give any justification for using a better quality gauge? It wouldn't make the product any more useful..
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#23
Bones
infrared, post: 4091539, member: 12770"
That's normally on industrial stuff to dampen vibration.. no vibration in this use case so no point in oil filling them
edit - plus that adds to the expense, and these are just cheapo air guages that go to 8psi. Far from being anything special.
Was about to say that myself - I've installed many a gauge in things like fire pumps, engines and such, which naturally has vibration while in use. For the purpose of testing pressure in a system like this, it's pointless in function and expense regarding it being mineral oil filled.
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#24
Deathy
jsfitz54, post: 4091523, member: 85467"
Only putting it out there because you questioned my use of lbs. (you wrote, "PSI?" )

When was the last time you used "bar" to inflate your tires?

European system would be hard to convert to say 35 PSI for car tires in dial format.

SO , EK needs to to make a dial that appeals to other standards, IMHO.
All you care about is the delta, no? If there is no delta, the system is fine, if you measure a different pressure after x minutes than at the start, you have a leak. And for someone who is anal about measurment units, you sure aren't anal about using a mass unit to measure pressure. :P
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#25
HUSKIE
If you have extension you can use this as compression test for your car. Nice EK
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