Thursday, June 25th 2020

Microsoft Ports OpenJDK to Windows on Arm

Microsoft has a goal to nurture the Windows on Arm (WoA) ecosystem and give new adopters the best possible experience. Today, Microsoft made an important announcement. The OpenJDK, an open-source implementation of the Java platform, is coming to the WoA project. Why this is so important you might question yourself? Well, the OpenJDK enables plenty of Java applications to run, so with this, Microsoft is giving WoA users a whole set of new supported applications. Take for example Minecraft Java edition. Now you can run that as well thanks to the new port. This shows commitment to the Arm platform by Microsoft and strong will to not abandon it.
Minecraft Java edition
Source: Microsoft
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4 Comments on Microsoft Ports OpenJDK to Windows on Arm

#1
bug
Keep in mind this is one of the few platforms not already supported by OpenJDK. OpenJDK can already be compiled for a bazillion targets, what Microsoft is doing here is more like doing QA and providing support. Which is still nice, but Java's primary audience remains the server side.
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#2
jeremyshaw
bug
Keep in mind this is one of the few platforms not already supported by OpenJDK. OpenJDK can already be compiled for a bazillion targets, what Microsoft is doing here is more like doing QA and providing support. Which is still nice, but Java's primary audience remains the server side.
Plenty of developer tools also rely on Java. Basically anything that had to be cross platform before Electron took the stage by storm. E.g, something like Kiel is Electron, but earlier tools like MPLAB X, Vivado, etc all require Java. Even Arduino IDE is Java-based (well, Wiring is).
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#3
R-T-B
Keep in mind OpenJDK has ran on ARM in linux land for like, forever. It's pretty much a straight recompile.
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#4
bug
jeremyshaw
Plenty of developer tools also rely on Java. Basically anything that had to be cross platform before Electron took the stage by storm. E.g, something like Kiel is Electron, but earlier tools like MPLAB X, Vivado, etc all require Java. Even Arduino IDE is Java-based (well, Wiring is).
Developing Android apps also needs a JVM for the most part ;)
There are still uses for Java (and friends) on the desktop. I was just saying, its primary target is elsewhere.
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