Monday, August 3rd 2020

GIGABYTE AORUS ATC800 CPU Cooler Tested for i9-10900K 5.10 GHz All-Core OC

GIGABYTE TECHNOLOGY Co. Ltd, a leading manufacturer of motherboards graphics cards, and hardware solutions, today announced AORUS ATC800 tower fan which is specially designed for multi-core processors, features stack fins, 6 Direct Touch Heatpipes that are each 6 mm in diameter, as well as a dual ball bearing structure, dual fan, and a unique fan blade design. It delivers superior heat dissipation TDP suppression for overclocking the Intel Core i9-10900K CPUs to all cores at 5.10 GHz under a Prime 95 burning-in test. AORUS ATC800 also integrates smart CPU temp/RPM light indicators for users to easily manage the system dissipation condition.

"Our liquid cooling products with i9 10900K CPU have accomplished all-core at 5.20 GHz under the burn-in test, which is attractive to many users. However, there are also comparatively more constraints on liquid cooling to make users hesitate" stated Jackson Hsu, Director of the GIGABYTE Channel Solutions Product Development Division. "GIGABYTE AORUS ATC800 tower fan makes use of fin thermal pad, 6 Direct-Touch Heatpipes, each 6 mm in diameter, dual ball bearing structure, and our unique fan blade design, for superior heat dissipation. All of these features are not only designed for users to overclock their Intel Core i9-10900K CPUs to all cores at 5.10 GHz under the Prime 95 burn-in test, but definitely fulfills all kinds of needs for CPU heat dissipation. The easy display of the temperature function and fashionable appearance are also essential to why people are enthusiastic for AORUS."
With the help of its composite mounting bracket, AORUS ATC800 can fully support most of the Intel and AMD processors, so users can upgrade to the latest 10th Generation Intel Core processors without extra purchase of new fans. AORUS ATC800 implements stack fins to enlarge the dissipation area. With 6 Direct-Touch Copper Heatpipes, each 6 mm in diameter, it can increase 20% in surface area compared to other designs of 3 heatpipes, which bolster heat dissipation. Specialized welding between the heatpipes and stacked fins not only strengthens the structure of the design but also draws heat away more quickly from the CPU to the fins, allowing the dual ball bearing fan to significantly lower temperatures.

Enhanced with distinguished product design, AORUS ATC800 can easily mitigate the heat and over 250 Watts TDP which is generated from overclocking the Intel Core i9-10900Ks to all cores at 5.10 GHz under the Prime 95 burn-in test. It not only provides users an excellent overclocking experience, but also reveals the design strength and quality of GIGABYTE AORUS cooling products.

Aside from being able to dissipate heat effectively, AORUS ATC800 embeds fashionable lighting effects that serve as a prompt key indicator for CPU temperature and fan RPM. Users don't need to access software or the BIOS to easily manage thermal conditions and build their cool and effective systems.
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25 Comments on GIGABYTE AORUS ATC800 CPU Cooler Tested for i9-10900K 5.10 GHz All-Core OC

#1
Chloe Price
Wonder what was the AVX offset they tested it with.. :rolleyes:
Posted on Reply
#2
claylomax
Why people think you need an AIO with the i9 10900k?
I cool mine with a Thermalright Archon and have no problem with temps.
By the way, AVX offset: 0
Posted on Reply
#3
Vya Domus
AORUS ATC800 can easily mitigate the heat and over 250 Watts TDP
A block of cheese can probably dissipate 250W too. The question is, how loud will it be, and how much temperature headroom you are left with.
claylomax
Why people think you need an AIO with the i9 10900k?
Technically you don't, but something decent with a 240 rad will be much quieter though and it occupies less room. Some of these air coolers are ridiculously large plus they dump heat into the case too. AIOs are just better all around.
Posted on Reply
#4
Vayra86
Vya Domus
A block of cheese can probably dissipate 250W too. The question is, how loud will it be, and how much temperature headroom you are left with.



Technically you don't, but something decent with a 240 rad will be much quieter though and it occupies less room. Some of these air coolers are ridiculously large plus they dump heat into the case too. AIOs are just better all around.
I'd pay to see a running fan on a block of cheese mounted on a CPU. I really would.

About cooling a 10900K all core OC with what looks like a Hyper 212 with additional plastic crap on it... yeah. I'm sure it won't crash and burn, but you will certainly throttle like a drag racer. And enjoy 3000+RPM
Posted on Reply
#5
Searing
Vayra86
I'd pay to see a running fan on a block of cheese mounted on a CPU. I really would.

About cooling a 10900K all core OC with what looks like a Hyper 212 with additional plastic crap on it... yeah. I'm sure it won't crash and burn, but you will certainly throttle like a drag racer. And enjoy 3000+RPM
It isn't like a hyper 212. It is way better. 6 v 4 heatpipes for starters... 2x fans vs 1 fan...
Posted on Reply
#6
Vayra86
Searing
It isn't like a hyper 212. It is way better. 6 v 4 heatpipes for starters... 2x fans vs 1 fan...
Still, a 10900K on all core OC? Good luck with that.
Posted on Reply
#7
dicktracy
Not surprising. 10900k can be tamed easily even in airflow-limited ITX cases. Intel did some magic with it and it isn’t even delided!
Posted on Reply
#8
claes
dicktracy
Not surprising. 10900k can be tamed easily even in airflow-limited ITX cases. Intel did some magic with it and it isn’t even delided!

Hey, could you post the source for this review? Thanks!
Posted on Reply
#9
bonehead123
Searing
It isn't like a hyper 212. It is way better. 6 v 4 heatpipes for starters... 2x fans vs 1 fan...
It IS like, but not identical, to a 212, the only REAL difference worth talking about is the # of heat pipes as mentioned.

AND fyi, you can very easily mount a 2nd fan onto a 212...the even give you the 2nd bracket for doing so, or at least they used to back in the day...

It was the first tower cooler I ever had and it was great for the cpu's of that era (early 2k), especially for < $30 at the time :roll:
Posted on Reply
#10
thebeansoldier
claes
Hey, could you post the source for this review? Thanks!
Optimum Tech from Youtube
Posted on Reply
#11
Caring1
"as well as a dual ball bearing structure, (and) dual fan(s)" :confused:
So where is this structure made from two ball bearings? :D
Posted on Reply
#12
Fry178
lol, yes, lets heat up the whole rig, run hw close to the upper (temp) limit rather than the lower end,
and lose more fps because of boost throttling (gpu), than what you gain from running intel instead of an amd..

not sure why ppl still want to save "few bucks" and stick with air cooling, especially since this wont be sub 30$ like the 212,
and given the cost of cpu/board..

@claylomax
because you dump the heat outside the case, lowering temps for everything else by around 20-30*C (rad setup as exhaust).
you need lots of air flow and proper case lay out and love fan noise, if you want a similar perf with an air cooler.
Posted on Reply
#13
Vya Domus
Fry178
because you dump the heat outside the case, lowering temps for everything else by around 20-30*C (rad setup as exhaust).
That's a bit exaggerated, I would say about 10-15c.
Posted on Reply
#14
Searing
Fry178
lol, yes, lets heat up the whole rig, run hw close to the upper (temp) limit rather than the lower end,
and lose more fps because of boost throttling (gpu), than what you gain from running intel instead of an amd..

not sure why ppl still want to save "few bucks" and stick with air cooling, especially since this wont be sub 30$ like the 212,
and given the cost of cpu/board..

@claylomax
because you dump the heat outside the case, lowering temps for everything else by around 20-30*C (rad setup as exhaust).
you need lots of air flow and proper case lay out and love fan noise, if you want a similar perf with an air cooler.
Water cooling is completely pointless. You obviously haven't built a computer properly or used quality parts. Can cool any CPU with ease and have no problems with airflow, buy the right case. Sorry your comment is weird.
Posted on Reply
#15
Vader
Even an intel stock cooler can cool a 10900K at 5.2 ghz. Just don't disclose test conditions and ambient temperature
Posted on Reply
#16
Fry178
@Searing
if you said "i dont like it/dont care for it", i might have taken you serious, but water cooling is pointless? lol, right.
might wanna google thermal transfer of
1. air
2. water
and when your at it, look up why/what "we" cool with water (outside desktops) on this planet.

you seem to be using onboard gpu, as anything mid range or higher will have a decent amount of heat coming off,
not just re-breathing cpu air.
guess what, gpus throttle boost depending on temps, and for Nv that starts at 43*C.

there are ppl that had a 2080S (LC) outperform the air cooled ti they replaced, just because of high temps.
guess they all cant build pc's either.

completely ignoring the noise part.
show me an air cooled rig with 20dba (while gaming),
while keeping cpu like a 3700 with pbo on about 50-60C, and a 2080S @2ghz below 45C.
Posted on Reply
#17
Vayra86
Fry178
@Searing
if you said "i dont like it/dont care for it", i might have taken you serious, but water cooling is pointless? lol, right.
might wanna google thermal transfer of
1. air
2. water
and when your at it, look up why/what "we" cool with water (outside desktops) on this planet.

you seem to be using onboard gpu, as anything mid range or higher will have a decent amount of heat coming off,
not just re-breathing cpu air.
guess what, gpus throttle boost depending on temps, and for Nv that starts at 43*C.

there are ppl that had a 2080S (LC) outperform the air cooled ti they replaced, just because of high temps.
guess they all cant build pc's either.

completely ignoring the noise part.
show me an air cooled rig with 20dba (while gaming),
while keeping cpu like a 3700 with pbo on about 50-60C, and a 2080S @2ghz below 45C.
All irrelevant because unless you do custom water none of that really works out quite like you say it does. Lets keep things realistic.
Posted on Reply
#18
Searing
Fry178
@Searing
if you said "i dont like it/dont care for it", i might have taken you serious, but water cooling is pointless? lol, right.
might wanna google thermal transfer of
1. air
2. water
and when your at it, look up why/what "we" cool with water (outside desktops) on this planet.

you seem to be using onboard gpu, as anything mid range or higher will have a decent amount of heat coming off,
not just re-breathing cpu air.
guess what, gpus throttle boost depending on temps, and for Nv that starts at 43*C.

there are ppl that had a 2080S (LC) outperform the air cooled ti they replaced, just because of high temps.
guess they all cant build pc's either.

completely ignoring the noise part.
show me an air cooled rig with 20dba (while gaming),
while keeping cpu like a 3700 with pbo on about 50-60C, and a 2080S @2ghz below 45C.
water is just the transfer mechanism between the heatsink and the cold plate... it is much more efficient (cost wise in particular) to just make a big heatsink and attach it directly, water itself doesn't cool at all, it is the radiator

i was a little heated mainly because I went to the local huge computer store and they are almost completely lacking in quality air coolers in stock, because there's too much profit to be made selling $200 useless water coolers to people
Posted on Reply
#19
hat
Enthusiast
If water cooling didn't work, enthusiasts wouldn't use it. Yes, in principle, water is just a thermal transmission medium. Yes, you can have a huge heatsink on your CPU instead. But you can only go so big before you run into problems. You can only fit so much heatsink on a CPU. Or, you can use water to move that heat to a nice 420mm radiator, for example, with tons of airflow going through. You could even run your graphics card through the same system and experience lower temperatures and higher performance there, too. Of course, it's not the most cost effective solution, but it exists for a reason. Nobody needs a V8 engine in a car either, and yet plenty of them exist, even though cheaper and more efficient options are available.
Posted on Reply
#20
Searing
hat
If water cooling didn't work, enthusiasts wouldn't use it. Yes, in principle, water is just a thermal transmission medium. Yes, you can have a huge heatsink on your CPU instead. But you can only go so big before you run into problems. You can only fit so much heatsink on a CPU. Or, you can use water to move that heat to a nice 420mm radiator, for example, with tons of airflow going through. You could even run your graphics card through the same system and experience lower temperatures and higher performance there, too. Of course, it's not the most cost effective solution, but it exists for a reason. Nobody needs a V8 engine in a car either, and yet plenty of them exist, even though cheaper and more efficient options are available.
it works, but is still pointless, it's for massive overclocks and bragging and looks, but isn't practical or cost effective, i have a 24 core epyc running just fine on air...
Posted on Reply
#21
hat
Enthusiast
That may be true for you, but not so much for another person. You can't reach the same low temperatures with air cooling that you can with water. Yes, one of the primary reasons for doing this is for huge overclocks... but we are on an enthusiast website, after all.
Posted on Reply
#22
Assimilator
hat
That may be true for you, but not so much for another person. You can't reach the same low temperatures with air cooling that you can with water. Yes, one of the primary reasons for doing this is for huge overclocks... but we are on an enthusiast website, after all.
In reality, it's actually not down to the heat transfer medium (air vs liquid), it's the ability to dissipate heat, and how fast you can do it that wins. Liquid generally does better than air (e.g. water is 25 times the thermal conductivity of air), but that advantage is mostly negated by the fact that your entire room is filled with air, versus a pair of thin water-filled tubes connected to your CPU.

Therefore, liquid's advantage in computer cooling isn't that it's a better medium than air, but that it's more flexible, because:

* it allows heat to be moved away from the source to a location where it can better be dissipated (vs a heatpipe air cooler which is extremely dependent on its orientation and the airflow in the chassis)
* it's almost infinitely extensible, by adding larger diameter tubing and/or a stronger pump and/or another radiator

It's this flexibility that allows (but does not guarantee) liquid coolers to be more performant than air coolers.
Posted on Reply
#23
Searing
the thermal conductivity of air and water is irrelevant, the heat is exhausted through a radiator, the same type, in both cases, there's nothing wrong with water cooling but it isn't useful or cost effective, it is overpriced style
Posted on Reply
#24
Fry178
@Vayra86/searing

and i can buy +100$ air coolers, doesnt mean all of them cost that much, nor am i forced to do a custom loop.
i spend 60$ on a 120 AIO from corsair that cools a FX8xxx/R3600 just fine, lowers temp inside the case so the gpu runs faster (1060),
while corsair covers any hw getting damaged if it fails for 5y.
not sure what air cooler comes with that kind of warranty, and even if, still doesnt dump the heat outside the case.
especially ppl spending +50$ on things like psu, +200$ for a board and 2-300$ each for cpu/gpu, now all of a sudden need to "save" money?

60-80$ will get a CLC from corsair or arctic
~100$ gets you an eisbaer 240 (non asetek design (better pump) that can be used right a way (prefilled), has a fill port so i can flush/refill etc,
and uses g1/4 connection/parts so i can upgrade/replace without problems, nor does LC always have to be a +200$ custom loop with 2 pumps.
especially since im actually running a 280 eisbaer that i extended to cool the 2080S, which required the purchase of a pair of hoses (20$),
so neither did i spend lots of cash on a custom loop, nor do i see more than 5C diff vs a custom loop running +100$ pump and block (each),
so my info is as realistic as it gets.

i have no problem if not everything is for everyone, or that ppl prefer certain stuff,
but thats not what you guys posted.
Posted on Reply
#25
Searing
Fry178
@Vayra86/searing

and i can buy +100$ air coolers, doesnt mean all of them cost that much, nor am i forced to do a custom loop.
i spend 60$ on a 120 AIO from corsair that cools a FX8xxx/R3600 just fine, lowers temp inside the case so the gpu runs faster (1060),
while corsair covers any hw getting damaged if it fails for 5y.
not sure what air cooler comes with that kind of warranty, and even if, still doesnt dump the heat outside the case.
especially ppl spending +50$ on things like psu, +200$ for a board and 2-300$ each for cpu/gpu, now all of a sudden need to "save" money?

60-80$ will get a CLC from corsair or arctic
~100$ gets you an eisbaer 240 (non asetek design (better pump) that can be used right a way (prefilled), has a fill port so i can flush/refill etc,
and uses g1/4 connection/parts so i can upgrade/replace without problems, nor does LC always have to be a +200$ custom loop with 2 pumps.
especially since im actually running a 280 eisbaer that i extended to cool the 2080S, which required the purchase of a pair of hoses (20$),
so neither did i spend lots of cash on a custom loop, nor do i see more than 5C diff vs a custom loop running +100$ pump and block (each),
so my info is as realistic as it gets.

i have no problem if not everything is for everyone, or that ppl prefer certain stuff,
but thats not what you guys posted.
I don't have any problem with water cooling. But if someone asks me, is there any point to it? I'll say no.

Costs more, not more effective, less reliable, and is all about looks. That's it. I regularly fix people's computers by removing their broken water cooling systems and just plopping a Noctua on there and they are surprised that water isn't as great as they thought.
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