Thursday, October 8th 2020

AMD Launches AMD Ryzen 5000 Series Desktop Processors: The Fastest Gaming CPUs in the World

Today, AMD (NASDAQ: AMD) introduced the highly anticipated AMD Ryzen 5000 Series desktop processor lineup powered by the new "Zen 3" architecture. Offering up to 16 cores, 32 threads and 72 MB of cache in the top-of-the-line AMD Ryzen 9 5950X, AMD Ryzen 5000 series processors dominate in heavily threaded workloads1 and power efficiency2, while the AMD Ryzen 9 5900X processor offers up to a 26% generational uplift in gaming performance3. With extensive improvements throughout the core including a unified 8-core complex with direct access to 32 MB L3 cache, the new AMD "Zen 3" core architecture delivers a 19% generational increase in instructions per cycle (IPC)4, the largest since the introduction of "Zen" processors in 2017.

"Our commitment with each generation of our Ryzen processors has been to build the best PC processors in the world. The new AMD Ryzen 5000 Series Desktop Processors extend our leadership from IPC4, power efficiency2 to single-core5, multi-core performance1 and gaming6," said Saeid Moshkelani, senior vice president and general manager, client business unit, AMD. "Today, we are extremely proud to deliver what our community and customers have come to expect from Ryzen processors - dominant multi-core1 and single-core performance5 and true gaming leadership6 - all within a broad ecosystem of motherboards and chipsets that are drop-in ready for AMD Ryzen 5000 Series Desktop Processors."
AMD Ryzen 5000 Series Desktop Processors
Featuring a remarkable 19% IPC increase4 over the prior generation in PC workloads, the "Zen 3" architecture pushes gaming and content creation performance leadership6,1 to a new level. "Zen 3" architecture reduces latency from accelerated core and cache communication and doubles the directly accessible L3 cache per core while delivering up to 2.8X more performance-per-watt versus the competition2.

The top of the line 16 core AMD Ryzen 9 5950X offers:
  • The highest single-thread performance of any desktop gaming processor5
  • The most multi-core performance of any desktop gaming processor and any desktop processor in a mainstream CPU socket1
The 12 core AMD Ryzen 9 5900X offers the best gaming experience by:
  • Average of 7% faster in 1080p gaming across select game titles than the competition7
  • Average of 26% faster in 1080p gaming across select titles generationally8
AMD 500 series motherboards are ready for AMD Ryzen 5000 Series desktop processors with a simple BIOS update. This broad ecosystem support and readiness includes over 100 AMD 500 series motherboards from all major motherboard manufacturers. AMD Ryzen 5000 Series desktop processors announced today are expected to be available for purchase globally on November 5, 2020.

AMD Ryzen Equipped to Win Game Bundle
The AMD Ryzen Equipped to Win game bundle program is back with the highly anticipated next chapter in the Far Cry series, Far Cry 6. Customers who purchase an AMD Ryzen 9 5950X, AMD Ryzen 9 5900X, or AMD Ryzen 7 5800X processor between November 5th, 2020 and December 31st, 2020 will receive a complimentary copy of Far Cry 6 Standard Edition - PC digital when released10 . Additionally, customers who purchase an AMD Ryzen 9 3950X, AMD Ryzen 9 3900XT, or AMD Ryzen 7 3800XT processor between October 20th, 2020 and December 31st, 2020 will also receive a free copy of Far Cry 6 Standard Edition - PC digital10.1 Testing by AMD performance labs as of 09/01/2020. Multi-core performance evaluated with Cinebench R20 nT with a similarly configured Ryzen 9 5950X vs. a Core i9-10900K. Results may vary. R5K-005
2 Testing by AMD Performance Labs as of 09/01/2020 using Cinebench R20 nT versus system wall power during full load CPU test using a Core i9-10900K, Ryzen 9 3900XT, Ryzen 9 5900X, Ryzen 9 3950X, and a Ryzen 9 5950X configured with: 2x8GB DDR4-3600, GeForce RTX 2080 Ti, Samsung 860 Pro SSD, Noctua NH-D15s cooler, and an open-air test bench with no additional power draw sources. Results may vary. R5K-007
3 Testing by AMD performance labs as of 09/01/2020 measuring gaming performance of a Ryzen 9 5900X desktop processor vs. a Ryzen 9 3900XT in 11 popular titles at 1920x1080, the High image quality preset, and the newest graphics API available for each title (e.g. DirectX 12 or Vulkan or DirectX 11). Results may vary. R5K-009
4 Testing by AMD performance labs as of 09/01/2020. IPC evaluated with a selection of 25 workloads running at a locked 4GHz frequency on 8-core "Zen 2" Ryzen 7 3800XT and "Zen 3" Ryzen 7 5800X desktop processors configured with Windows 10, NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti (451.77), Samsung 860 Pro SSD, and 2x8GB DDR4-3600. Results may vary. R5K-003
5 Testing by AMD performance labs as of 09/01/2020 with a Ryzen 9 5950X processor vs a Core i9-10900K configured with NVIDIA GeForce GTX 2080 Ti graphics, Samsung 860 Pro SSD, 2X8 DDR4-3600, Windows 10 and a Noctua NH-D15s cooler. Single-core performance evaluated with Cinebench R20 1T benchmark. Results may vary. R5K-004
6 Testing by AMD performance labs as of 9/2/2020 based on the average FPS across 40 PC games at 1920x1080 with the High image quality preset using an AMD Ryzen 9 5900X processor vs. Core i9-10900K. Results may vary. R5K-002
7 Testing by AMD performance labs as of 09/01/2020 measuring the Gaming performance of a Ryzen 9 5900X vs a Core i9-10900K in 11 popular titles at 1920x1080, the High image quality preset, and the newest graphics API available for each title (e.g. DirectX 12 or Vulkan over DirectX 11, or DirectX 11 over DirectX 9). GeForce RTX 2080 Ti (451.77), 2x8GB DDR4-3600, Noctua NH-D15s, and Windows 10 May 2020 Update (build 2004) used for all titles. Results may vary. R5K-010
8 Testing by AMD performance labs as of 09/01/2020 measuring gaming performance of a Ryzen 9 5900X desktop processor vs. a Ryzen 9 3900XT in 11 popular titles at 1920x1080, the High image quality preset, and the newest graphics API available for each title (e.g. DirectX 12 or Vulkan or DirectX 11). Results may vary. R5K-009
9 Max boost for AMD Ryzen Processors is the maximum frequency achievable by a single core on the processor running a bursty single-threaded workload. Max boost will vary based on several factors, including, but not limited to: thermal paste; system cooling; motherboard design and BIOS; the latest AMD chipset driver; and the latest OS updates. GD-150
10 Limited time offer available through participating retailers only. 18+ only. Following purchase, product must be installed on system where coupon code will be redeemed. Void where prohibited. Residency and additional limitations apply. Full offer terms at www.amdrewards.com/terms.
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216 Comments on AMD Launches AMD Ryzen 5000 Series Desktop Processors: The Fastest Gaming CPUs in the World

#77
Rob94hawk
So AMD has nothing to challenge Intel and Nvidia with 4k gaming. Disappointed.
Posted on Reply
#78
Icon Charlie
Rhurba
I am VERY VERY VERY disappointed on the new pricing. It is clear that without competition, the consumer is fked. I started building a new PC some time ago, buying some parts every month in expectation of the new Ryzen 5000 - I bought the new B550 also - now I'm sorry I did that, seeing the new prices. Indeed Intel sucks for keeping the 14 nm++++ so much but, right now, with the new pricing, AMD has become the new Intel. Sad. Very sad.
Just hope that the RDNA2 GPU will be price accordingly - 400-450$... Sad times, companies sucking money out of consumers like this....
I mostly agree with you and I am getting sick and tired of the total BS of market speak trying to push product. I know that the majority of the silicon WILL NOT REACH the sustained rates stated. Only the cherry picked silicon will hit those numbers. So expect those maximum number printed on the packaging to be down a few hundred hertz.... OR has people already forgotten the lies of last generation about their performance speed.

I still have my packaging for my 3600 stating that it will hit 4.3 ghz.... It never went over 4.1 or higher on my rig. AMD Lied to me about the performance increase of last generation of CPU. Just remember that a lot of this is just market speak and unless you win the silicon lottery, your results will vary.
Posted on Reply
#79
PooPipeBoy
So the cynical folk who predicted that the 5900X would be a power-hungry overheating pile with a 150W TDP that AMD simply overclocked to reach 5.0GHz were.....what's the word.....WRONG.
Posted on Reply
#80
RandallFlagg
Hm, seems like the shoe might be on the other foot with AMD vs Intel.

Let me see if I can switch my arguments.

So, is it really worth it to spend an extra $100 on AMD for 1-2 fps? Intel is good enough and is a better price/performance ratio, nobody will notice those 2 fps.

How am I doing?
Posted on Reply
#81
HD64G
Rob94hawk
So AMD has nothing to challenge Intel and Nvidia with 4k gaming. Disappointed.
Hasty assumptions. The numbers shown are strong indication of that GPU being very close to 3080. Check that the numbers shown were on ultra 4K.
Posted on Reply
#82
dragontamer5788
RandallFlagg
Hm, seems like the shoe might be on the other foot with AMD vs Intel.

Let me see if I can switch my arguments.

So, is it really worth it to spend an extra $100 on AMD for 1-2 fps? Intel is good enough and is a better price/performance ratio, nobody will notice those 2 fps.

How am I doing?
You're not doing it correctly yet.

Start with the proposition that 10-core / 20-threads is going to be superior for productivity at the $450 price point compared to the 8c/16t 5800x. THEN you talk down the gaming FPS numbers.
Posted on Reply
#83
Rob94hawk
HD64G
Hasty assumptions. The numbers shown are strong indication of that GPU being very close to 3080. Check that the numbers shown were on ultra 4K.
I hope I'm wrong and you are right. Unless AMD is holding their cards close to their chest before launch.
Posted on Reply
#84
TheLostSwede
Icon Charlie
I mostly agree with you and I am getting sick and tired of the total BS of market speak trying to push product. I know that the majority of the silicon WILL NOT REACH the sustained rates stated. Only the cherry picked silicon will hit those numbers. So expect those maximum number printed on the packaging to be down a few hundred hertz.... OR has people already forgotten the lies of last generation about their performance speed.

I still have my packaging for my 3600 stating that it will hit 4.3 ghz.... It never went over 4.1 or higher on my rig. AMD Lied to me about the performance increase of last generation of CPU. Just remember that a lot of this is just market speak and unless you win the silicon lottery, your results will vary.
I guess you're not aware that all of that was fixed after about six months worth of UEFI and AGESA updates? Ignorance is bliss...
Posted on Reply
#85
mborghi
I am planning a complete upgrade for year's end, and hoped there will be a new chipset for Zen 3, likely a x670. Somewhat disappointed about this, but I read somewhere that vendors may release refreshed motherboard models for these new CPUs. Intel seems to be releasing a new one on Q1 2021, but I don't want to wait that much! I will be switching to AMD platform mostly for PCie 4 storage speeds.
Posted on Reply
#86
phill
I know the way forward for a CPU upgrade..... :)
Posted on Reply
#87
AnarchoPrimitiv
Rhurba
I am VERY VERY VERY disappointed on the new pricing. It is clear that without competition, the consumer is fked. I started building a new PC some time ago, buying some parts every month in expectation of the new Ryzen 5000 - I bought the new B550 also - now I'm sorry I did that, seeing the new prices. Indeed Intel sucks for keeping the 14 nm++++ so much but, right now, with the new pricing, AMD has become the new Intel. Sad. Very sad.
Just hope that the RDNA2 GPU will be price accordingly - 400-450$... Sad times, companies sucking money out of consumers like this....
Why do so many people expect AMD, and no other company, to be a charity and just give away products?
Posted on Reply
#88
dont whant to set it"'
@phill cryptic , love it.
If anything like my r3 3300x trend wise , all core oc 100mhz above rated core performance boost @ stock cooler, then an r5 5600x might suit the itchy upgrade ocd of mine.
Posted on Reply
#89
Fouquin
AddSub
So my AM4 Gigabyte X370 Gaming 5 is compatible with these Zen3's, or Zen2, or Zen+ even? Yeah, I thought so. The much vaunted AMD "platform longevity" in action.

...
..
.


Posted on Reply
#90
Darmok N Jalad
It’s a shame they couldn’t hit the 5.0ghz barrier. You know the engineers probably wanted to get there in the worst way. I’m guessing these will behave like 3000 series, where they will reach max clocks better on their own boosting algorithm and there won’t be any overclocking. It’s not a bad showing by any means—the design changes and IPC uplift are something to be proud of, and the power consumption sounds like it’s going to be so much better. And all this on the same 7nm node. I know these aren’t reviews, but I’d be surprised if the benchmarks they posted couldn’t be reproduced. Just makes me wonder what GPU they were using. :)
Posted on Reply
#92
Animalpak
Will they finally supporting XMP from RAM's ? Because AMD was and is now still is a disaster on XMP memory modules.
Posted on Reply
#93
Toothless
Tech, Games, and TPU!
Animalpak
Will they finally supporting XMP from RAM's ? Because AMD was and is now still is a disaster on XMP memory modules.
I turn on XMP in my bios, and it works. I'm pretty sure it works for most people.
Posted on Reply
#95
xman2007
Animalpak
Because AMD was and is now still is a disaster on XMP memory modules.
No, no they're not. Yes AMD support a lower overall RAM speed than Intel CPU's but buying a suitable kit when building a PC should be the same as any other expensive purchase you make, you research what you are buying and don't just throw money at it cause "dats the fastest and mostest xpensivvvv/cheapest so it must be de besssssttt" :kookoo: XMP is an intel technology and whilst it is good and all, if you don't do some basic homework on what parts you're buying and if they're compatible, how is that down to AMD? for AMD there are recommended kits of DDR4 RAM and tested kits for each and every motherboard that you can buy, but as we see with all the "My Ryzen motherboard doesn't run my RAM at their rated speed" threads people don't do that, they buy a CPU and motherboard and any old RAM they feel like throwing in there without doing so much of a smidgeon of googling about compatibility and complain when it doesn't work right. The fact that AMD motherboards support XMP is a plus point, but building a PC is not the same as building a lego set and if you have little experience in doing so but just wanted to try after watching 1 YouTube video on "how easy" it is then you really should stump up the extra $50/$100 bucks to get someone or a company who has the required knowledge and experience to do it for you and then just use your consumer rights to return it and get it sorted instead of wondering why your Corsair LPX 3200 won't run at it's rated speed on your Ryzen build.
Posted on Reply
#96
Tartaros
So the same discussions about "how x company would hike their prices when the time is right for them" everytime a launch happens. Enterprises are enterprises and in capitalism the bottom line is profit, stop investing sentimentally in companies or justifying them. They are not your friends nor do this for good will, they want your money and put themselves in a position where they can earn more money.
Posted on Reply
#97
Metroid
ViperXTR
Where is the 5700X tho
I guess amd wanted a large margin this time but I think they made it wrong, it could have a 5700 which would be a 8 core and then a 5800 as 10 core cpu. They lost this opportunity. So would be 5600 6 core, 5700 8 cores, 5800 10 cores and 5900 12 cores and 5950 16 cores.
Posted on Reply
#98
RandallFlagg
Given these new prices, the most interesting comparisons for typical builds becomes the 5600X vs 10700 (non K), and the 5800X vs the 10900K.

That will be an interesting comparison.

It seems Intel may not have anything to compete directly with a 5900X, assuming those benchmarks are representative of overall performance.
Posted on Reply
#99
dicktracy
All of a sudden, gaming matters again for AMD fans. LOL
Posted on Reply
#100
Redwoodz
Animalpak
Will they finally supporting XMP from RAM's ? Because AMD was and is now still is a disaster on XMP memory modules.
Extreme Memory Profile ( XMP) is a specification serving as an extension to the standard JEDEC SPD specifications developed by INTEL. XMP is intended to make overclocking easier and more accessible to new users through profiles and predefined overclocking configurations that are known to be stable. Why would memory specs designed for Intel work the same with AMD?
Posted on Reply
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