Thursday, October 8th 2020

AMD Launches AMD Ryzen 5000 Series Desktop Processors: The Fastest Gaming CPUs in the World

Today, AMD (NASDAQ: AMD) introduced the highly anticipated AMD Ryzen 5000 Series desktop processor lineup powered by the new "Zen 3" architecture. Offering up to 16 cores, 32 threads and 72 MB of cache in the top-of-the-line AMD Ryzen 9 5950X, AMD Ryzen 5000 series processors dominate in heavily threaded workloads1 and power efficiency2, while the AMD Ryzen 9 5900X processor offers up to a 26% generational uplift in gaming performance3. With extensive improvements throughout the core including a unified 8-core complex with direct access to 32 MB L3 cache, the new AMD "Zen 3" core architecture delivers a 19% generational increase in instructions per cycle (IPC)4, the largest since the introduction of "Zen" processors in 2017.

"Our commitment with each generation of our Ryzen processors has been to build the best PC processors in the world. The new AMD Ryzen 5000 Series Desktop Processors extend our leadership from IPC4, power efficiency2 to single-core5, multi-core performance1 and gaming6," said Saeid Moshkelani, senior vice president and general manager, client business unit, AMD. "Today, we are extremely proud to deliver what our community and customers have come to expect from Ryzen processors - dominant multi-core1 and single-core performance5 and true gaming leadership6 - all within a broad ecosystem of motherboards and chipsets that are drop-in ready for AMD Ryzen 5000 Series Desktop Processors."
AMD Ryzen 5000 Series Desktop Processors
Featuring a remarkable 19% IPC increase4 over the prior generation in PC workloads, the "Zen 3" architecture pushes gaming and content creation performance leadership6,1 to a new level. "Zen 3" architecture reduces latency from accelerated core and cache communication and doubles the directly accessible L3 cache per core while delivering up to 2.8X more performance-per-watt versus the competition2.

The top of the line 16 core AMD Ryzen 9 5950X offers:
  • The highest single-thread performance of any desktop gaming processor5
  • The most multi-core performance of any desktop gaming processor and any desktop processor in a mainstream CPU socket1
The 12 core AMD Ryzen 9 5900X offers the best gaming experience by:
  • Average of 7% faster in 1080p gaming across select game titles than the competition7
  • Average of 26% faster in 1080p gaming across select titles generationally8
AMD 500 series motherboards are ready for AMD Ryzen 5000 Series desktop processors with a simple BIOS update. This broad ecosystem support and readiness includes over 100 AMD 500 series motherboards from all major motherboard manufacturers. AMD Ryzen 5000 Series desktop processors announced today are expected to be available for purchase globally on November 5, 2020.

AMD Ryzen Equipped to Win Game Bundle
The AMD Ryzen Equipped to Win game bundle program is back with the highly anticipated next chapter in the Far Cry series, Far Cry 6. Customers who purchase an AMD Ryzen 9 5950X, AMD Ryzen 9 5900X, or AMD Ryzen 7 5800X processor between November 5th, 2020 and December 31st, 2020 will receive a complimentary copy of Far Cry 6 Standard Edition - PC digital when released10 . Additionally, customers who purchase an AMD Ryzen 9 3950X, AMD Ryzen 9 3900XT, or AMD Ryzen 7 3800XT processor between October 20th, 2020 and December 31st, 2020 will also receive a free copy of Far Cry 6 Standard Edition - PC digital10.1 Testing by AMD performance labs as of 09/01/2020. Multi-core performance evaluated with Cinebench R20 nT with a similarly configured Ryzen 9 5950X vs. a Core i9-10900K. Results may vary. R5K-005
2 Testing by AMD Performance Labs as of 09/01/2020 using Cinebench R20 nT versus system wall power during full load CPU test using a Core i9-10900K, Ryzen 9 3900XT, Ryzen 9 5900X, Ryzen 9 3950X, and a Ryzen 9 5950X configured with: 2x8GB DDR4-3600, GeForce RTX 2080 Ti, Samsung 860 Pro SSD, Noctua NH-D15s cooler, and an open-air test bench with no additional power draw sources. Results may vary. R5K-007
3 Testing by AMD performance labs as of 09/01/2020 measuring gaming performance of a Ryzen 9 5900X desktop processor vs. a Ryzen 9 3900XT in 11 popular titles at 1920x1080, the High image quality preset, and the newest graphics API available for each title (e.g. DirectX 12 or Vulkan or DirectX 11). Results may vary. R5K-009
4 Testing by AMD performance labs as of 09/01/2020. IPC evaluated with a selection of 25 workloads running at a locked 4GHz frequency on 8-core "Zen 2" Ryzen 7 3800XT and "Zen 3" Ryzen 7 5800X desktop processors configured with Windows 10, NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti (451.77), Samsung 860 Pro SSD, and 2x8GB DDR4-3600. Results may vary. R5K-003
5 Testing by AMD performance labs as of 09/01/2020 with a Ryzen 9 5950X processor vs a Core i9-10900K configured with NVIDIA GeForce GTX 2080 Ti graphics, Samsung 860 Pro SSD, 2X8 DDR4-3600, Windows 10 and a Noctua NH-D15s cooler. Single-core performance evaluated with Cinebench R20 1T benchmark. Results may vary. R5K-004
6 Testing by AMD performance labs as of 9/2/2020 based on the average FPS across 40 PC games at 1920x1080 with the High image quality preset using an AMD Ryzen 9 5900X processor vs. Core i9-10900K. Results may vary. R5K-002
7 Testing by AMD performance labs as of 09/01/2020 measuring the Gaming performance of a Ryzen 9 5900X vs a Core i9-10900K in 11 popular titles at 1920x1080, the High image quality preset, and the newest graphics API available for each title (e.g. DirectX 12 or Vulkan over DirectX 11, or DirectX 11 over DirectX 9). GeForce RTX 2080 Ti (451.77), 2x8GB DDR4-3600, Noctua NH-D15s, and Windows 10 May 2020 Update (build 2004) used for all titles. Results may vary. R5K-010
8 Testing by AMD performance labs as of 09/01/2020 measuring gaming performance of a Ryzen 9 5900X desktop processor vs. a Ryzen 9 3900XT in 11 popular titles at 1920x1080, the High image quality preset, and the newest graphics API available for each title (e.g. DirectX 12 or Vulkan or DirectX 11). Results may vary. R5K-009
9 Max boost for AMD Ryzen Processors is the maximum frequency achievable by a single core on the processor running a bursty single-threaded workload. Max boost will vary based on several factors, including, but not limited to: thermal paste; system cooling; motherboard design and BIOS; the latest AMD chipset driver; and the latest OS updates. GD-150
10 Limited time offer available through participating retailers only. 18+ only. Following purchase, product must be installed on system where coupon code will be redeemed. Void where prohibited. Residency and additional limitations apply. Full offer terms at www.amdrewards.com/terms.
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216 Comments on AMD Launches AMD Ryzen 5000 Series Desktop Processors: The Fastest Gaming CPUs in the World

#176
dragontamer5788
RandallFlagg
Net shows you nothing in that regard as it includes capital expenditures
Ah got it. So you don't know how to read a financial statement.

Spoiler: capex is under cash flow and is not subtracted from net. This is basic stuff. If you buy a $1 billion factory, then it means -$1 billion cash but +$1billion in assets, for a net change of $0.

What is subtracted is depreciation. If your $1 billion factory will only last 20 years, then you need to make $50 million / year to counteract it. (Not that AMD really makes factories... but their computers and hardware is tech and inevitably will only last a small period of time: 5 year upgrade cycles or whatever. Especially whatever expensive computers they use for verification). Some Capex can be avoided thanks to cloud compute, but because EDA requires such huge computational resources, I'm pretty sure AMD / Intel / etc. etc. have to constantly buy very expensive FPGAs for their formal verification.
Posted on Reply
#177
RandallFlagg
dragontamer5788
Ah got it.

So you don't know how to read a financial statement.

Spoiler: capex is under cash flow and is not subtracted from net. This is basic stuff. If you buy a $1 billion factory, then it means -$1 billion cash but +$1billion in assets, for a net change of $0.

What is subtracted is depreciation. If your $1 billion factory will only last 20 years, then you need to make $50 million / year to counteract it.
Net Income is the bottom line so it most definitely includes costs associated with R&D. Maybe you should go look a bit closer before you spout off.


corporatefinanceinstitute.com/resources/knowledge/accounting/net-operating-income-noi/

"..net income is the last figure obtained after all expenses are subtracted from the total revenue. The total revenue includes all channels of income, including all operating income, investment income, interest from loans offered, etc. The costs deducted include capital expenses, taxes, and all operating expenses. "

Finance 101 example, note that R&D (capital) is subtracted before you get to the "Bottom Line" Net Income.

Capital expenditures for physical assets also show up here albeit indirectly. I'll give you a hint. Where do you suppose that depreciation line comes from?


Posted on Reply
#178
agentnathan009
RandallFlagg
Actually I imagine that Intel will lower prices earlier, even if not officially. You can already get a 10700 for $299 at Microcenter, $319 at Newegg, and $317 at B&H Photo. Given that the 10700 has a fan with it, this actually makes it cheaper than a 5600X @$299 + $30 fan.

I think the 10850K launch makes a lot more sense now. Intel probably knew that the 5800X would come in right at $450, which is exactly where the 10c/20t 10850K sits.

Probably something worth noting. Intel 14nm, they own the fab, and it's super efficient with high yields. I don't think AMD/TSMC will win a price war with Intel, I bet Intel could sell the 10850K for $300 and still make more money than AMD can make on a 5800X at $450. But it sure would be nice if someone would start a price war.
There is already a price war and you fail to understand and comprehend how much money it takes to develop these complex chips nowadays. Go become a chip engineer and find out how hard it is to make this stuff at smaller and smaller nodes let alone TSMC etc having to develop means to make smaller nodes. If you don't like the price buy a cheaper model, sure it is nice to have the best but everyone cannot afford the Ferrari, most of us drive the common brands like Ford, Toyota, etc.
Posted on Reply
#179
dragontamer5788
RandallFlagg
Net Income is the bottom line so it most definitely includes costs associated with R&D.
You didn't say R&D earlier. You said CapEx.
Net shows you nothing in that regard as it includes capital expenditures like building new plants, developing new products, marketing costs, and various administrative costs. So in fact, Net is the one that is 'fake' and can be manipulated. A highly profitable company can invest heavily in capital expenditures and appear to be broke on Net.
Which is just factually wrong entirely. If you spend $10 Billion on a factory, it will show up as a change of $0 on Net.
Capital expenditures for physical assets also show up here albeit indirectly
CapEx is always a Cash-flow issue. Never on the income statement. Period. Depreciation is depreciation, almost a different concept all together (though financially tied to CapEx).
Posted on Reply
#180
RandallFlagg
dragontamer5788
You didn't say R&D earlier. You said CapEx.
Yah, I mentioned R&D and CapEx were not part of Gross Margin original post. Given that 14nm has been around 5 years, this is just what it costs to make a chip. Maybe you should go back and re-read the original post, you're making points that I addressed from step 1.
dragontamer5788
Which is just factually wrong entirely. If you spend $10 Billion on a factory, it will show up as a change of $0 on Net.
I think you missed it, again. A $10B factory built 5 years ago most definitely shows up on the Net Income statement. It shows up in the form of depreciation. If you build 10 $10B factorys, one each year, and depreciate them over 10 years, then on year 10 with the 10th factory your depreciation will be $10B. To say that it does not show up at all on net income is totally false, it shows up spread out over time.
Posted on Reply
#181
R0H1T
Calmmo
Mine was 500 ~3.5 months after launch. That was after actively trying acquire one for the entirety of those first 3 months and not being able to.
(people like to talk about nvidia paper launches these days, but AMD did exact the same thing with their R9 CPUs just last year, wont be surpised if its the same with 5000 again)
That is true though you must also know that the demand for CPUs is much higher than dGPUs, between consoles/HPC/server/desktop/notebooks & other embedded zen2 chips how many do you think AMD's selling vs Ampere (including the full fat A100) in the same period say first 3-4 months? My best guess at least 10x & that's a conservative guesstimate by all accounts.
Posted on Reply
#182
TheUn4seen
Oh my. Here we go with the hype again. You see, I heard exactly the same claims just before getting the 955BE. What a horribly bad CPU it was, completely obliterated by an overclocked i3-540. Turned me off AMD and their false claims for years. They can't produce a GPU which is clearly faster than my 1080ti from almost four years ago, which I don't even use any more. They can't even match Intel's performance in games, all while spewing crazy claims before every launch.
Let's wait and see the actual reviews, not the usual marketing bag of crap. If they are actually as good as claimed than that's great, but we'll see.

(disclaimer: I'm not a millennial, hence I don't see any rationale in streaming games or recording the gameplay. I'm also not a hobbyist "youtube video" maker. I only care for raw performance in day-to-day and real time tasks. For doing important things I have serious work machines at my place of employment).
Posted on Reply
#183
P4-630
Some prices of Finland and Portugal:

Posted on Reply
#184
RandallFlagg
TheUn4seen
Oh my. Here we go with the hype again. You see, I heard exactly the same claims just before getting the 955BE. What a horribly bad CPU it was, completely obliterated by an overclocked i3-540. Turned me off AMD and their false claims for years. They can't produce a GPU which is clearly faster than my 1080ti from almost four years ago, which I don't even use any more. They can't even match Intel's performance in games, all while spewing crazy claims before every launch.
Let's wait and see the actual reviews, not the usual marketing bag of crap. If they are actually as good as claimed than that's great, but we'll see.

(disclaimer: I'm not a millennial, hence I don't see any rationale in streaming games or recording the gameplay. I'm also not a hobbyist "youtube video" maker. I only care for raw performance in day-to-day and real time tasks. For doing important things I have serious work machines at my place of employment).
Ya, I went and looked at their claims on release of the 3900X. It turned out they cherry picked a bit too hard, many of the 3900X claims fell on their face in the real world, However Zen 2 had really good price/performance ratio anyway. Their claims for the 5900X show a bigger delta vs Intel than the 3900X claims though. Having said that, with these big price increases If AMD doesn't live up to their claims with Zen 3 they're gonna get roasted. They no longer have a price / perf ratio to fall back on.
Posted on Reply
#185
R0H1T
That's not an argument when AMD's selling 4 gens of Ryzen, including the upcoming zen3 series. Absolute performance, perf/$ & perf/w is still vastly in their favor!
Posted on Reply
#186
RandallFlagg
R0H1T
That's not an argument when AMD's selling 4 gens of Ryzen, including the upcoming zen3 series. Absolute performance, perf/$ & perf/w is still vastly in their favor!
Meh, not really. By including old gens the price/$ argument begins to unravel. Intel old gens are also for sale. What’s resale value of an 8700k vs 1700x? What was true total cost of ownership?
Posted on Reply
#187
R0H1T
What's the resale value go to do with anything? What's the price of a 1800x or 2700x & a suitable (cheap) motherboard? Now tell me what a brand new 8700k + z370 costs :rolleyes:

Your argument falls flat on it face when Intel itself kills their old gen instead of making them cheap, not to mention the effin motherboard/chipset mess!
Posted on Reply
#188
dragontamer5788
RandallFlagg
I think you missed it, again. A $10B factory built 5 years ago most definitely shows up on the Net Income statement. It shows up in the form of depreciation. If you build 10 $10B factorys, one each year, and depreciate them over 10 years, then on year 10 with the 10th factory your depreciation will be $10B. To say that it does not show up at all on net income is totally false, it shows up spread out over time.
And why do you want to remove this from the accounting? If you have $10 billion in factories (which turns into a $9 billion factory after a year of wear-and-tear), you need to make $1 Billion extra that year before you break even. (Or whatever your depreciation schedule is).

If your factories are breaking down and you're failing to replace them, then your company is spiraling down, out of control and going to die soon. That's why we look at net, especially with companies like AMD where a technology (ex: Zen, or Infinity Fabric) goes obsolete... eventually worthless after a few years. Keeping up-to-date with the latest tech is incredibly important for a company like this, and constitutes a significant amount of spending (upgrading the design to Zen2, or Zen3, etc. etc.)

Or, in the more traditional sense of depreciation, the 10,000 FPGAs that AMD has to run RTL simulations or whatever get more and more worthless as time goes on. If AMD is working with equipment that's too old, then they will lose an engineering advantage over their competitors. Those FPGAs are depreciating assets: losing money over time. AMD must not only make enough margin to make cash... but enough cash to replace their old equipment as well (at least, if AMD wishes to remain in business 5 years from now).

------

In either case: CapEx never is on the income statement. Only depreciation is on the income statement. CapEx is on cash flow. Its important to know the three documents (cash flow, income statement, and asset sheet) if you want to seriously compare different companies against each other. There are also inconsistencies between companies (different companies may qualify different costs as R&D vs CapEx based off the opinion of their management team). So its never an apples-to-apples comparison.

As such, something like gross income is subject to more variance between companies. Net income includes literally everything and is more consistent between different companies.
Posted on Reply
#189
Icon Charlie
RandallFlagg
Meh, not really. By including old gens the price/$ argument begins to unravel. Intel old gens are also for sale. What’s resale value of an 8700k vs 1700x? What was true total cost of ownership?
True value of ownership is person to person. Normally speaking it is how long you can use the components in question to do the majority of your tasks.
My 1800X is still valuable and is at times better than my 3600 due to being a 8 core vs a 6 core. If my 3600 reached 4.3 as stated on my box I would have been really happy but it is only as fast as my 1800X which out of the box hit 4.1 hz. In multiple applications the 8 core still performs better.

In 2017 it was the first time in 27 years that I made a 2 year build (instead of a 4 year build) because AMD and the tech industry had the BEST Performance vs Value I ever seen. 16 gigs of high quality Ram. An SSD and a HDD Drive, with a X370 mother board, 1800X, and a 1070 video card... all new for $900 including tax and shipping.

In DEC 2019 I did the same thing with even more Ram for $990 (900 plus tax and shipping).

If I would have build the same 2019 Rig with all new parts it would cost me $1200+ dollars, because prices went up to100% PSU's (yea companies do talk to each other that is why PSU prices went up because of the video cards... NOT tarrifs and not the cooof), up to 50% on motherboards, up to 200%+ on CPU Coolers, up to 25% or more Fans, Video cards and so on.

I mean come on man... they are pushing 27 inch curved 165hz monitors for the same price and performance on my Pixio PX329 32 inch NON CURVED monitor. All because of market speak.

I am not happy with the price of the video cards nor the CPU's All of this BS about massive performance increase are just marketing lies.

I am seriously thinking of just not upgrading and going back to my usual every 4 to 5 years for a new rig while making small upgrades along the way. I've never bought used on important components but now I am thinking of going that route too. The 3600 is a great deal and the pricing has had actually gone up new (Ebay 185 w cooler) I bought mine for 175 w/cooler new) but because of the LOUSY price vs performance of the 5000 series cpus over the 3000 series cards... I'm so going to wait for any upgrade.

2017 was the year of change for the better, for the customer. 2020 is the year of greed as they price gouge the customer base.

But there are enough Gerbils out there that will continue to buy and make these companies really... happy...
Posted on Reply
#190
oobymach
Makaveli

I'm full of both brilliance and stupidity, so you take what you get.
Posted on Reply
#191
RandallFlagg
R0H1T
What's the resale value go to do with anything? What's the price of a 1800x or 2700x & a suitable (cheap) motherboard? Now tell me what a brand new 8700k + z370 costs :rolleyes:

Your argument falls flat on it face when Intel itself kills their old gen instead of making them cheap, not to mention the effin motherboard/chipset mess!
I am not the one who introduced comparison with previous gen chip prices on spot markets into this. As I said, once you do that you need to look at all aspects. Intel doesn't kill their old gen, they simply stop making them. You seem to attribute bizarre price fluctuations when supply on something old dries up to the manufacturer. That's like blaming Ford for the Ford GT costing $500K 10+ years after they sold them new for $137K.

The same thing is happening in AMD space, the 1600X at Newegg is $245 vs the 3600 at $199. Using your logic, I guess AMD is price gouging huh?

And if you think Zen 2 (3000) series will maintain availability for long, you might want to re-think that. It's highly unlikely that AMD will keep manufacturing cheap chips in the expensive and constrained TSMC 7nm pipeline. Unlike the overhang of supply in Zen 1 and 1+ (2000 series) which were made on relatively cheap GloFlo 14nm and 12nm with some production after Zen 2 7nm was launched, there's no such dual production path for Zen 2 and 3. Any Zen 2 chips AMD orders made, would be a Zen 3 chip they can't sell. I would imagine that the Zen 2 3xxx series will dry up very fast.
Posted on Reply
#192
Zach_01
Where on earth you people find those crystal balls?
It’s like you sleep next to Lisa Su...

Amazing!
oobymach
Anyone else notice they skipped 4000? My guess is a hardware flaw that was only noticed partway through manufacturing, why else would they skip a gen?
Because of the mobile ZEN2 4000series?
Posted on Reply
#193
Th3pwn3r
RandallFlagg
The same thing is happening in AMD space, the 1600X at Newegg is $245 vs the 3600 at $199. Using your logic, I guess AMD is price gouging huh?
I waited a long time for AMD to finally release info on the 5000 series. That info came out and I what a big MEH from me. I was holding off on a build due to one of my machines having issues. Well after seeing what AMD is going to offer I bought a 3600 and a B550 motherboard for when AMD comes to their senses and drops their prices or offers something similar to price/performance that the 3600 offered. As I see it right now the Ryzen 5000 series has to compete against the 3600 and is going to sit on lots of 5000 series CPUs until 3600 stock is cleared out. I paid $160 for the 3600 today at Microcenter this morning(Saturday) and at that price why buy anything else or wait for the 5000 series, I do like the 65w tdp on the $299 5600x but I'm not going to pay almost double just because the TDP is low. The Microcenter employee told me they had sold 93 of the 3600 this week and I made the 94th purchase at that store and there's a reason for that. AMD isn't going to see the same sales and most people have done their panic/pandemic builds already. I don't think it's just AMD that is going to see a decline in sales as I think Intel sales will drop as well but I think the 5000 series launch is going to be a dud. Next up is Big Navi, I hope I'm not disappointed with that too, I'm holding onto my 2080ti until I can either get a 3080 or AMD stops pissing around and finally offers a real GPU.
Posted on Reply
#194
Zach_01
Th3pwn3r
I waited a long time for AMD to finally release info on the 5000 series. That info came out and I what a big MEH from me. I was holding off on a build due to one of my machines having issues. Well after seeing what AMD is going to offer I bought a 3600 and a B550 motherboard for when AMD comes to their senses and drops their prices or offers something similar to price/performance that the 3600 offered. As I see it right now the Ryzen 5000 series has to compete against the 3600 and is going to sit on lots of 5000 series CPUs until 3600 stock is cleared out. I paid $160 for the 3600 today at Microcenter this morning(Saturday) and at that price why buy anything else or wait for the 5000 series, I do like the 65w tdp on the $299 5600x but I'm not going to pay almost double just because the TDP is low. The Microcenter employee told me they had sold 93 of the 3600 this week and I made the 94th purchase at that store and there's a reason for that. AMD isn't going to see the same sales and most people have done their panic/pandemic builds already. I don't think it's just AMD that is going to see a decline in sales as I think Intel sales will drop as well but I think the 5000 series launch is going to be a dud. Next up is Big Navi, I hope I'm not disappointed with that too, I'm holding onto my 2080ti until I can either get a 3080 or AMD stops pissing around and finally offers a real GPU.
You have a 1200$ MSRP card and 300$ is too much for a CPU with better gaming performance that 3900XT/3950X?

Ok!
Posted on Reply
#195
Th3pwn3r
Zach_01
You have a 1200$ MSRP card and 300$ is too much for a CPU with better gaming performance that 3900XT/3950X?

Ok!
I paid $899 plus tax Ok! And the price is relative, if Intel comes out with a GPU that's $1000 and offers a good performance increase I'd consider that too. Not trying to brag but I have almost $6,000 worth of subwoofers in my living room, however, I have a cheap $100 sub too, it performs as expected. It's about prices being relative.
Posted on Reply
#196
Zach_01
Th3pwn3r
I paid $899 plus tax Ok! And the price is relative, if Intel comes out with a GPU that's $1000 and offers a good performance increase I'd consider that too. Not trying to brag but I have almost $6,000 worth of subwoofers in my living room, however, I have a cheap $100 sub too, it performs as expected. It's about prices being relative.
I'm not arguing with that kind of relativity.
All I'm saying is that a 300$ CPU is better in gaming than a 500~750$ CPUs from previous gen.
And we dont know yet the all core performance...
Posted on Reply
#197
R0H1T
RandallFlagg
Intel doesn't kill their old gen, they simply stop making them.
No they really kill them, EOL is the term you're looking for. With their chipset BS, if you're on the wrong gen you are locked out of upgrading!
RandallFlagg
You seem to attribute bizarre price fluctuations when supply on something old dries up to the manufacturer.
You seem to be contradicting yourself, aren't you? With post SKL chips they're just rebadging their old stuff & still doing the chipset BS :rolleyes:

Also supply doesn't just dry up, when the manufacturer is adamant they need to rebadge their old stuff &/or lock out users from upgrading that's when this BS needs to be called out.
RandallFlagg
The same thing is happening in AMD space, the 1600X at Newegg is $245 vs the 3600 at $199. Using your logic, I guess AMD is price gouging huh?
And I got a 2700 at roughly $160 including taxes just in the last quarter, your point? Is it AMD price gouging or is it Newegg?
RandallFlagg
And if you think Zen 2 (3000) series will maintain availability for long, you might want to re-think that. It's highly unlikely that AMD will keep manufacturing cheap chips in the expensive and constrained TSMC 7nm pipeline.
That depends on how expensive 5nm is, looking at early reports zen2 is here to stay at least another year if not more!
Posted on Reply
#198
Turmania
I truly believe, Ryzen has matured now, I have a strong feeling this 5xxx series will exceed expectations. But, on moral grounds their asking prices on both CPU and MB, they lost their foot on that front and can never use that anymore.
Posted on Reply
#199
RandallFlagg
R0H1T
No they really kill them, EOL is the term you're looking for. With their chipset BS, if you're on the wrong gen you are locked out of upgrading!
You seem to be contradicting yourself, aren't you? With post SKL chips they're just rebadging their old stuff & still doing the chipset BS :rolleyes:
...
And this is different from AMD how? You gonna run Zen 3 on a B350, after all it is an AM4 socket? For that matter, B450 is a dicey proposition and depends on the motherboard manufacturer. At least with Intel, you cannot insert the chip into a motherboard with a completely incompatible chipset.

Posted on Reply
#200
londiste
RandallFlagg
And this is different from AMD how? You gonna run Zen 3 on a B350, after all it is an AM4 socket? For that matter, B450 is a dicey proposition and depends on the motherboard manufacturer. At least with Intel, you cannot insert the chip into a motherboard with a completely incompatible chipset.
It is completely compatible. Support is an artificial limitation. 300 and 400 series chipsets are almost identical.
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