Thursday, October 15th 2020

Silverstone Intros VIVA Line of Mainstream PSUs

Silverstone today introduced the VIVA line of mainstream PSUs. Available in mid-range capacities of 550 W, 650 W, and 750 W, these PSUs offer fixed cabling, and cover all the essentials for a gaming PC build. Under the hood, the VIVA series features a single +12 V rail design, 80 Plus Bronze efficiency, active PFC, and most common electrical protections, against over/under-voltage, overload, and short-circuit. All three models offer flat black cables. A 120 mm noise-optimized fan with 18 dBA minimum noise output, cools the PSU. All three models come with two 4+4 pin EPS connectors. The 750 W model includes four 6+2 pin PCIe power connectors, while the 550 W and 650 W models have two. The VIVA series PSUs are build in a 14 cm long chassis. The company didn't reveal pricing or warranty information.
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28 Comments on Silverstone Intros VIVA Line of Mainstream PSUs

#1
bonehead123
Fixed cables, whahdatbe, hahahahaha ?

If it's not modular, it's not worth my time or moolah, hehehe :)

And with the ever increasingly power-hungry parts nowadays (ie... 10th & 11th gen intel cpu's & RTX 3xxx), who in their right mind would try to build a "gaming" rig with only a 750w psu anyways ?
Posted on Reply
#2
Vya Domus
bonehead123
who in their right mind would try to build a "gaming" rig with only a 750w psu anyways ?
Because it's enough?
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#3
-The_Mask-
bonehead123
And with the ever increasingly power-hungry parts nowadays (ie... 10th & 11th gen intel cpu's & RTX 3xxx), who in their right mind would try to build a "gaming" rig with only a 750w psu anyways ?
People who choose quality over quantity, so the smarter people I guess.
Posted on Reply
#4
PLSG08
bonehead123
And with the ever increasingly power-hungry parts nowadays (ie... 10th & 11th gen intel cpu's & RTX 3xxx), who in their right mind would try to build a "gaming" rig with only a 750w psu anyways ?
550w-650w is enough for nearly everyone. Not everyone is running a 3080 or a 2080 ti. The majority of PC gamers are usually running X60 to X70 gpus and CPUs are usually the i5/Ryzen 5, so 750w is pretty much overkill
Posted on Reply
#5
Chrispy_
Affordable, High Quality, Available

Pick any two.

Realistically, if it's good enough quality that will be fine.

It sure makes a change from all the ridiculously expensive 1500W PSUs being launched at exactly the time Nvidia are officially killing SLI for consumer use.
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#6
-The_Mask-
Chrispy_
at exactly the time Nvidia are officially killing SLI for consumer use.
That's because the future is in DX12 multi-GPU.
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#7
Chrispy_
-The_Mask-
That's because the future is in DX12 multi-GPU.
People have been saying that for several years now, yet the games industry is moving steadily in the opposite direction.
Posted on Reply
#8
Turmania
Lately I see all the manufacturers rolling out bronze versions.
Posted on Reply
#9
-The_Mask-
Chrispy_
People have been saying that for several years now, yet the games industry is moving steadily in the opposite direction.
Nope, it's going slowly from SLI and CrossFire to DX12 multi-GPU, not the opposite direction.
Posted on Reply
#10
ExcuseMeWtf
DX12 multiGPU will be as much of a niche as SLI/CF was if not more, since onus is on devs to provide support, and they prob won't bother without some green incentive for nVidia. :p
Posted on Reply
#11
LTUGamer
Those side stickers looks very similar:

Posted on Reply
#12
-The_Mask-
ExcuseMeWtf
DX12 multiGPU will be as much of a niche as SLI/CF was if not more, since onus is on devs to provide support, and they prob won't bother without some green incentive for nVidia. :p
Of course, as long as it isn't really needed it will stay really small.
Posted on Reply
#13
kiriakost
LTUGamer
Those side stickers looks very similar:
Yes they should better hire an artist, so to paint the next Mona Liza over a PSU .... :laugh:
Some comments they are inspiration for strong laughs.
Thanks!
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#14
Chrispy_
-The_Mask-
Nope, it's going slowly from SLI and CrossFire to DX12 multi-GPU, not the opposite direction.
No you're completely missing the point; It's not going in any kind of multi-GPU direction whatsoever.

The industry has shifted focus towards technologies that are fundamentally incompatible or unable to take advantage of addition GPUs like variable refresh, lag reduction, screen-space compute shaders covering occlusion, reflection etc. It's also absolutely terrible for VR where multiple latency-sensitive viewports are being rendered extremely efficiency by sharing extremely similar data and calculation type as both viewports pass through the pipeline with very little overhead for the second viewport on the same GPU. Multi-GPU is the opposite of that, generating a single viewport using duplicated data sets across duplicate GPUs and converging the result into a single, heavily-buffered stream that hides the additional variance behind some additional buffering that results in higher latency. It's inefficient and it's expensive to not just duplicate all that data, but work on it separately when there are additional benefits to having everything in a single unified dataset. This is why single large caches are always better than multiple smaller caches.

Journalism has also evolved away from focusing solely on average FPS and now looks at a more complete picture of gameplay fluidity - 99th percentile fps, frame delivery times, minimum FPS, and how smooth those frame-time graphs are - and this more complete picture of game performance exposes all the problems with multi-GPU rendering. Apart from having higher average FPS, pretty much every other metric is a bad result that objectively provides the hard evidence that multi-GPU doesn't feel great, even when the FPS numbers are better.

Finally there are the other smaller reasons that have always existed (like poor performance scaling, needless doubling of expensive things like GDDR6 or HBM2, the fact you need a huge case with good cooling and a beefy power supply) and new reasons - the next gen GPUs both supporting direct storage access over PCIe - Trying to get that to work over two cards will, at the very best, double the amount of data read and effectively halve the PCIe bandwidth and storage performance, all whilst multi-GPU is itself reducing that available bandwidth by stealing it for the GPU-to-GPU data feed. Not to mention the newest reason of all - you need a pair of $1500 cards to even try and get the damn thing working at the moment. Back in the heyday of multi-GPU you could get half-decent results with most of the cards on the market, starting from about $150 per card.

There is no situation where any of the possibilities points towards gaming adopting multi-GPU again. It has died and both the devs and the GPU driver teams are breathing a collective sigh of relief that it's almost gone for good. It doesn't work for consoles, it doesn't work for laptops, it's a nightmare best avoided for any kind of cross-platform development, and Nvidia no longer offer it on any of their gaming cards.
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#15
-The_Mask-
Second time today you make a statement which already has been explained a post earlier. :D
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#16
Chrispy_
-The_Mask-
Second time today you make a statement which already has been explained a post earlier. :D
Well, if you will say silly things like "the games industry is moving towards multi-GPU", what do you expect? :P
Posted on Reply
#18
ObiFrost
Turmania
Lately I see all the manufacturers rolling out bronze versions.
I don't mind bronze as long as they keep the price down, but unfortunately, they don't. PSUs are probably the least catagory in computer components where direct competition is happening... Just multiple rebrands with fake DC-DC conversion and black cables, the rest seems the same specs wise for multiple years now. Also thanks to the virus Gold has become twice as expensive as it was prior to it, which sucks, because I could find 650-750w Platinums (diminishing returns so not really a justfiable upgrade over Gold) for $120 in my area, now all see are entry Golds around that price range. Frankly, any new bronze shouldn't be priced over $40 for 500-550w model.
Posted on Reply
#19
Toothless
Tech, Games, and TPU!
-The_Mask-
That's not what I said.
-The_Mask-
Nope, it's going slowly from SLI and CrossFire to DX12 multi-GPU, not the opposite direction.
Are, are you sure?

Anyway, looks like I might keep these in mind for replacing my current PSU in case I need more power for the 2680v2.
Posted on Reply
#20
R-T-B
Toothless
Are, are you sure?

Anyway, looks like I might keep these in mind for replacing my current PSU in case I need more power for the 2680v2.
The tentacle monster still keeping you up at night? (reference to his fixed cable, but decent quality PSU in specs).
Posted on Reply
#21
-The_Mask-
Toothless
Are, are you sure?
Yeah... He said something different then I did.
ObiFrost
I don't mind bronze as long as they keep the price down, but unfortunately, they don't. PSUs are probably the least catagory in computer components where direct competition is happening... Just multiple rebrands with fake DC-DC conversion and black cables, the rest seems the same specs wise for multiple years now. Also thanks to the virus Gold has become twice as expensive as it was prior to it, which sucks, because I could find 650-750w Platinums (diminishing returns so not really a justfiable upgrade over Gold) for $120 in my area, now all see are entry Golds around that price range. Frankly, any new bronze shouldn't be priced over $40 for 500-550w model.
80PLUS has nothing to with quality or performance. It's also isn't a particularly good way to measure efficiency. Because of that it's possible for a 80PLUS Bronze PSU to be more efficient than a 80PLUS Gold one in your PC.

Therefore it's useless to use the 80PLUS certification to determe a good price for the PSU.
Posted on Reply
#22
Toothless
Tech, Games, and TPU!
R-T-B
The tentacle monster still keeping you up at night? (reference to his fixed cable, but decent quality PSU in specs).
Still trucking along. New case has all that goodness nice and hidden.
Posted on Reply
#23
Chrispy_
Toothless
Still trucking along. New case has all that goodness nice and hidden.
I'm not sure I'm keen on fixed cabling any more, Who needs molex and FDD connectors any more - and for a new build without RGBLED even SATA connectors are starting to go unused for a lot of people because a 1TB M.2 does the job for lower cost than a SATA drive and people are increasingly streaming things from the web and cloud services rather than storing them locally now. (not me, I still have 8TB local and another 8TB in a NAS, but I'm just saying that more commissions I make for staff have me leaving the SATA connectors in the box that those using spinning rust)

I'm still a little unsure of why full modular is so popular though. I get that some people with lots of money and vanity builds want to replace every visible cable with some custom-braided, colour-coded replacements - but that's a tiny, insignificant niche.

For the 99.9% I don't understand why you'd want a modular 24-pin cable and 4+4 CPU power cable. They're mandatory, and for any PSU over 300W, so is at least one of the PCIe power cables, too. Making them modular just increases the cost and adds needless bulk to the area where the cables come out of the PSU, potentially making the PSU body longer than it would otherwise need to be as well.
Posted on Reply
#24
Toothless
Tech, Games, and TPU!
Chrispy_
I'm not sure I'm keen on fixed cabling any more, Who needs molex and FDD connectors any more - and for a new build without RGBLED even SATA connectors are starting to go unused for a lot of people because a 1TB M.2 does the job for lower cost than a SATA drive and people are increasingly streaming things from the web and cloud services rather than storing them locally now. (not me, I still have 8TB local and another 8TB in a NAS, but I'm just saying that more commissions I make for staff have me leaving the SATA connectors in the box that those using spinning rust)

I'm still a little unsure of why full modular is so popular though. I get that some people with lots of money and vanity builds want to replace every visible cable with some custom-braided, colour-coded replacements - but that's a tiny, insignificant niche.

For the 99.9% I don't understand why you'd want a modular 24-pin cable and 4+4 CPU power cable. They're mandatory, and for any PSU over 300W, so is at least one of the PCIe power cables, too. Making them modular just increases the cost and adds needless bulk to the area where the cables come out of the PSU, potentially making the PSU body longer than it would otherwise need to be as well.
Well it was either fixed cable Rosewill that was an amazing deal or a 550w Raidmax for two GTX780's.
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#25
Chrispy_
Toothless
or a 550w Raidmax for two GTX780's.
Do you like fire? That's how you get fire :)
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