Wednesday, July 14th 2021

TerraMaster Introduces F4-421 Professional NAS with Quad-Core Processor

TerraMaster, a professional brand that specializes in providing innovative storage products for home, businesses and enterprises, introduces the F4-421 4-bay professional NAS powered by an Intel quad core processor with dual Gigabit network ports for improved networking reliability. The F4-421 supports network aggregation and failover with its dual LAN ports, automatically switching to the second networking port in cases of downtime - a seamless transition for a reliable backup system.

The TerraMaster F4-421 comes fitted with 4 GB of DDR3 memory which is upgradeable up to 8 GB (4 GB+4 GB) to boost performance. The F4-421 supports live hardware transcoding of up to two concurrent 4K videos.It also provides a high-quality video playback to a wide variety of supported devices including smart TVs, digital media players, phones, and computers. The F4-421 is an ideal multimedia storage for entertainment and a reliable data storage for small office and home office applications.
Powerful Configuration, Excellent Performance
TerraMaster F4-421 with an Intel quad-core 1.50 GHz (turbo boost up to 2.3 GHz) processor, 4 GB DDR3 memory (upgradeable to 8 GB), and two 1 GbE ports. It delivers speeds of up to 118 MB/s.F4-421 supports a variety of disk array modes, including RAID 0, RAID 1, RAID 5, RAID 6, RAID 10, JBOD, and SINGLE, to meet the needs of various users and levels of data security.It also features AES hardware encryption offering superb data security for business applications.

Dual Gigabit Network Interfaces
TerraMaster F4-421 is equipped with two Gigabit network interfaces to support network aggregation and failover. This allows the F4-421 to continuously remain online even when one network fails, reducing the possibility of service interruption. Furthermore, the F4-421's network aggregation enables faster connection speeds compared to a single network interface.

Advanced File System and Security
The F4-421 features superior storage technology and optimized snapshot technology of the Btrfs file system. This provides advanced data protection, prevention of data corruption, and minimal maintenance cost. Users can benefit from flexible, storage-saving advanced data protection at the file or folder level with efficient data recovery.

Simple Remote Access with TNAS Mobile
Users can now set up and remote access TerraMaster NAS using the TNAS mobile app. Remote access the TerraMaster F4-421 and set up complex network settings anytime and anywhere. The TNAS mobile app allows you to connect through simple, customizable addresses so that you can instantly access media and work files on any Windows/Mac/Linux computer, laptop or mobile device.

Multilayer Safety Protection
The F4-421 comes with a complete multilayer safety protection against malicious network attacks. It supports SSL encryption, firewalls, Anti-DoS attacks, and advanced account protection, TNAS also offers a special advanced security mode to increase the overall device security level.

Pricing and Availability
The TerraMaster F4-421 4-Bay Professional NAS is competitively priced at $459.99.
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9 Comments on TerraMaster Introduces F4-421 Professional NAS with Quad-Core Processor

#1
TheinsanegamerN
BORING. Who cares if it has 11 million cores when its limited to 1Gbps ethernet speeds? A cheap marvell controller can easily saturate that kind of network without issue.

This is a complete waste of money.
Posted on Reply
#2
zlobby
TheinsanegamerNBORING. Who cares if it has 11 million cores when its limited to 1Gbps ethernet speeds? A cheap marvell controller can easily saturate that kind of network without issue.

This is a complete waste of money.
Do note that this is the 'professional' version nonetheless. :D
Posted on Reply
#3
Chrispy_
TheinsanegamerNBORING. Who cares if it has 11 million cores when its limited to 1Gbps ethernet speeds? A cheap marvell controller can easily saturate that kind of network without issue.

This is a complete waste of money.
The F4-422 costs an extra $40 and gives you 10GbE, not that 3.5" drives can come anywhere close to saturating that...

I was seriously considering a CoolerMaster TerraMaster NAS last year as their specs and prices are vastly superior to QNAP and Synology but there were too many user reviews of software issues requiring a data-destructive reinstall of the NAS OS. Whether FUD or not, I was more concerned about a rock-stable set-and-forget user experience than an actual powerful NAS so I got an overpriced, pathetically under-specced Synology NAS instead and it hasn't skipped a beat.
Posted on Reply
#4
zlobby
Chrispy_The F4-422 costs an extra $40 and gives you 10GbE, not that 3.5" drives can come anywhere close to saturating that...
I guess you don't run many HDD in RAID?

Also, yeah. Synology sucks big time. QNAP are my personal choice although they are not without flaws either.
Posted on Reply
#5
Chrispy_
zlobbyI guess you don't run many HDD in RAID?

Also, yeah. Synology sucks big time. QNAP are my personal choice although they are not without flaws either.
Well, this is for four spinning rust drives so even RAID0 (which is utterly stupid in the era of SSDs) isn't going to saturate 10GbE. A 6-drive array might do it, with fast enough disks that are all empty so using the outer sectors. Real-world read/write on 4x half-full 7200RPM SATA drives is 650MB/s.

FWIW I have multiple racks of storage across three branches and two datacenters from Dell, HPE Nimble, Nexsan,TrueNAS, and a bunch of homebrew Supermicro servers with DAS enclosures. I'm not as well versed on HDD in RAID as some of my buddies who deploy in multiples of 20 servers for a day job, but it's something I've been doing professionally for over 20 years.
Posted on Reply
#6
zlobby
Chrispy_Well, this is for four spinning rust drives so even RAID0 (which is utterly stupid in the era of SSDs) isn't going to saturate 10GbE. A 6-drive array might do it, with fast enough disks that are all empty so using the outer sectors. Real-world read/write on 4x half-full 7200RPM SATA drives is 650MB/s.

FWIW I have multiple racks of storage across three branches and two datacenters from Dell, HPE Nimble, Nexsan,TrueNAS, and a bunch of homebrew Supermicro servers with DAS enclosures. I'm not as well versed on HDD in RAID as some of my buddies who deploy in multiples of 20 servers for a day job, but it's something I've been doing professionally for over 20 years.
And after that experience you still consider this option viable? Honestly?
Posted on Reply
#7
Chrispy_
zlobbyAnd after that experience you still consider this option viable? Honestly?
Viable? I was just replying to @TheinsanegamerN's complaint that gigabit ethernet was too slow.

There are plenty of use cases I can think of that would justify having 10GbE on a 4-bay device: RAID10 would provide reasonable protection against drive failure whilst offering ~350MB/s writes and ~650MB/s reads. That's good enough to scrub through 4k video editing directly on the NAS. It's fast enough to use as a Steam games library, It would cut down the time taken for daily backups by a factor of three compared to a gigabit NAS. I'm sure if I thought about it for more then 30 seconds I could think of other benefits.

The market for multi-bay, x86-based consumer NAS units is huge - there's a broad spectrum of viable products from ultra-budget 1-bay NAS all the way up to 8-bay stuff that's practically rebadged enterprise kit. I guess it's photographers with laptops driving that trend but with laptops still selling with shitty 500MB SSDs in them it's no surprise that the consumer NAS market is still growing rapidly.
Posted on Reply
#8
Minus Infinity
TheinsanegamerNBORING. Who cares if it has 11 million cores when its limited to 1Gbps ethernet speeds? A cheap marvell controller can easily saturate that kind of network without issue.

This is a complete waste of money.
I was about to say something similar. Not to offer even 2.5Gbs ethernet is pathetic.
Posted on Reply
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