Wednesday, July 21st 2021

New World (Closed Beta), an MMO, Found Bricking GeForce RTX 3090 Graphics Cards

A closed beta of "New World," an MMO in development by Amazon Game Studios, is found damaging NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3090 graphics cards. Apparently the game causes a catastrophic failure of RTX 3090 graphics cards, even before it begins rendering the scene. "I just bricked a 3090 in the main menu after setting my graphics quality to medium and hitting save," wrote one user on Reddit.

Amazon in a statement on Wednesday, said that it has received two reports from RTX 3090 users on high GPU usage when playing the game, "consistent with playing a graphically rich game." It is said to be working on a patch that addresses the issue, but in the meantime, urged users to dial down their graphics settings. EVGA has come out with a statement of its own, saying that its RTX 3090 graphics cards getting bricked for playing the game would be "completely under warranty."
Source: greyzone78 (Reddit)
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98 Comments on New World (Closed Beta), an MMO, Found Bricking GeForce RTX 3090 Graphics Cards

#2
Mussels
Moderprator
Vsync on = all safe
Posted on Reply
#3
JAB Creations
MusselsVsync on = all safe
The problem is that unless there is a configuration file that you already know about and are absolutely certain how to turn V-Sync on then you run the risk of a 7,000+FPS black screen between you and turning it on in the game's menus. Most people aren't going to know that until either they come across the news (presuming they read or watch tech news) or their card gets killed.
Posted on Reply
#4
Hyderz
okay got it a game to avoid :P
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#5
dicktracy
It’s mostly evga cards that’s dying due to insane stock voltage at full load. Avoid evga cards!
Posted on Reply
#6
AsRock
TPU addict
dicktracyIt’s mostly evga cards that’s dying due to insane stock voltage at full load. Avoid evga cards!
Well no need to avoid any really is there ?.
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#7
owen10578
I'd bet money the game generated a load similar to Furmark. Then this is more dangerous on the cards with higher TDP.
Posted on Reply
#8
Mussels
Moderprator
I wonder if its peeps burning out PCI-E power cables like my 3090 did
Posted on Reply
#9
kayjay010101
RTSS, max FPS, global profile. Problem solved, for this title and any other title with uncapped framerates.
Posted on Reply
#10
R-T-B
dicktracyIt’s mostly evga cards that’s dying due to insane stock voltage at full load. Avoid evga cards!
have my doubts it's vcore related, unless you have evidence? This strikes me as gddr6x related.
Posted on Reply
#11
ShurikN
R-T-Bhave my doubts it's vcore related, unless you have evidence? This strikes me as gddr6x related.
Buildzoid already talked about this, and he suspects OCP an possibly blown fuses
Posted on Reply
#12
R-T-B
ShurikNBuildzoid already talked about this, and he suspects OCP an possibly blown fuses
I'd take him as a credible reference, appreciate that detail.
Posted on Reply
#13
bug
dicktracyIt’s mostly evga cards that’s dying due to insane stock voltage at full load. Avoid evga cards!
How do you avoid video cards at a time when video cards avoid users in the first place?
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#14
PanicLake
The fact that I have RivaTunerStatisticServer always active with frame limits on my monitor max refresh rate might come handy sometimes :)
Posted on Reply
#15
Vayra86
Powerlevelling just got a whole new meaning I guess
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#16
efikkan
With so much wild speculation flying, I have to add this;
High frame rates are never dangerous, there is no way that by itself is causing damage, frame rates in the thousands can't even create high load due to CPU overhead. Graphics developers run games in modes at thousands or tens of thousands of FPS frequently, and if this was a graphics card killer, we would know.

If software is triggering something that bricks cards, then there is an underlying bug in firmware or hardware. If a such bug exist, then it should be resolved by the manufacturer, the software is not to blame for causing such damage. Let me stress that while this is a theoretical possibility, it's exceedingly rare.
In over 15 years of graphics development I think I've seen one case where I'm fairly sure buggy software triggered a state which caused permanent damage (and perhaps 1-2 more cases where it was suspected).

I'm more curious to know the answers to the following;
- How many are actually affected? (<10? hundreds?)
- How many of the affected cards have never been overclocked?
- Have any of the affected cards been previously used for sustained loads (like mining)?
Posted on Reply
#17
R-T-B
I'm also curious if EVGAs XOC bioses they make available were part of the picture...
Posted on Reply
#18
watzupken
efikkanWith so much wild speculation flying, I have to add this;
High frame rates are never dangerous, there is no way that by itself is causing damage, frame rates in the thousands can't even create high load due to CPU overhead. Graphics developers run games in modes at thousands or tens of thousands of FPS frequently, and if this was a graphics card killer, we would know.

If software is triggering something that bricks cards, then there is an underlying bug in firmware or hardware. If a such bug exist, then it should be resolved by the manufacturer, the software is not to blame for causing such damage. Let me stress that while this is a theoretical possibility, it's exceedingly rare.
In over 15 years of graphics development I think I've seen one case where I'm fairly sure buggy software triggered a state which caused permanent damage (and perhaps 1-2 cases more where it was suspected).

I'm more curious to know the answers to the following;
- How many are actually affected? (<10? hundreds?)
- How many of the affected have never overclocked their cards?
- Have any of the affected cards been previously used for sustained loads (like mining)?
I am quite doubtful the high FPS/ load is to be blamed for burning out the cards. While I am not into any game/ software development, I've not run into any issues like this for at least the past 2.5 decades. It is usually software/ driver related that will brick cards. I wonder if AMD cards are equally impacted.
dicktracyIt’s mostly evga cards that’s dying due to insane stock voltage at full load. Avoid evga cards!
Ironically that is also one of the reason why people want to buy an EVGA or top end card with 3 PCI-E power connectors, since it allows them more headroom to overclock.
Posted on Reply
#19
Mussels
Moderprator
Long video here, lots of pictures from TPU

Posted on Reply
#20
kayjay010101
MusselsLong video here, lots of pictures from TPU

Anyone care to make a TL;DR? Appreciate Buildzoid's work and expertise but I'm not watching him ramble on for half the length a feature-length film :D
Posted on Reply
#21
Mussels
Moderprator
kayjay010101Anyone care to make a TL;DR? Appreciate Buildzoid's work and expertise but I'm not watching him ramble on for half the length a feature-length film :D
Nv has a history of using shunts instead of more expensive over voltage/current protection since the 590, as found here on TPU 3 million years ago when GPU go boom during review
he suspects thats the issue, that some models are getting big spikes in power, tripping safeties (the crashes/black screens) and the shunts/whatever it is eventually fail, causing permanent death
Posted on Reply
#22
bug
efikkanWith so much wild speculation flying, I have to add this;
High frame rates are never dangerous, there is no way that by itself is causing damage, frame rates in the thousands can't even create high load due to CPU overhead. Graphics developers run games in modes at thousands or tens of thousands of FPS frequently, and if this was a graphics card killer, we would know.
I think I've seen something similar before (can't recall if it actually killed the cards), it was about uncapped framerates at the game menu. Not bottlenecked by the CPU, it would shoot temps sky high.
But yes, you'd expect thermal throttling to kick in or, if not, no OCP should kick in either.

That said, we won't figure it out here, let's wait for proper investigation.
Posted on Reply
#23
delshay
I'm almost 100% sure a MOSFET has gone. It make's a snapping sound. Inductors has nothing to do with it & don't make popping sounds.
It's a manufacturing fault of the card & not the game, but I don't think all cards from the same group are affected. I think it's just user specific.

Awaiting to see the first user to take they card apart & post photo In countries where the warranty sticker is not valid..
Posted on Reply
#24
Ravenas
People pay $60 to get into closed beta, and then gripe about closed beta things.
Posted on Reply
#25
agatong55
RavenasPeople pay $60 to get into closed beta, and then gripe about closed beta things.
What close beta are you playing that bricks a GPU?
Posted on Reply
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