Tuesday, August 10th 2021

Introducing Epomaker NT68 - Extremely Versatile Mechanical Keyboard With a Carrying Case

Epomaker announces the Epomaker NT68, a wireless 65% compact mechanical keyboard designed with versatility, which comes with a foldable carrying case which can be used as a movable stand. This is a slim, sleek, and smart keyboard designed for creators, developers, gamers, and anyone who seeks performance, portability, and comfort anywhere they need to work and game.

Type and play games efficiently and comfortably on your familiar keyboard layout - the NT68 can directly sit on the top of your laptop's built-in keyboard while preserving the laptop's trackpad at your most familiar position for more precision and control. No matter you are using windows system or macOS, the media keys you need can be easily accessed by designated shortcuts. By pressing FN+W/E, you can effortlessly switch the keyboard layout between Windows and macOS. If there are any specific preferences, NT68's software allows you to customize the layout and remap the keys based on any personal needs. Your customized layout can be stored as a layer in the keyboard, and you can save up to 3 customized layers, which refers to three different layouts to fit your various devices.
Additionally, the NT68 comes with a foldable magnetic carrying case which also works as a stand depending on personal needs. Fold the case to create a triangle stand with an ergonomic 45° of tilt to dock your tablet and phone, and then type emails or play games. The adjustable RGB backlit ensures that you can see what you are doing in any condition, indoors or outdoors, day or night.

To best fit the working and gaming needs anywhere you are, the NT68 offers both wireless and wired connectivity modes, you can even connect it with up to 3 devices simultaneously, such as laptops, tablets, and smartphones. The Epomaker NT68 is a hot-swappable keyboard available in Gateron low profile switches, Gateron Regular switches, and Epomaker proprietary Chocolate switches. If you are one of the DIY keyboard enthusiasts, you can also replace the switches with other 3-pin or 5-pin mechanical switches. Regarding the hot-swappable compatibility, the low profile switches can be replaced with other 3-pin or 5-pin low profile switches, and the regular switches can be replaced with other 3-pin or 5-pin regular MX-style switches.

Pricing and Availability
Epomaker NT68 will be released at 10:00 EDT, 10th August on Kickstarter. The super early bird price starts at $89, and the early bird price starts at $95. Both price sets are at a limited amount on the first-come-first-serve services. Keyboards are available in two versions: NT68 Low Profile version and NT68 Regular version. Both versions can be used for macOS and Windows.

Regarding normal daily use, NT68 is compatible with most of the laptop brands. To use the specific magic feature (place it on your laptop's built-in keyboard), the integrated laptop keyboard needs to have a similar layout as the NT68, such as a 13" or 14" laptop, MacBook Air, MacBook Pro. Laptops with integrated numpad (ThinkPad P73, for example) can't use the feature but can use the NT68 as a compact mechanical keyboard.

For more information, please visit Epomaker.com, Epomaker NT68 Kickstarter Campaign, our blog, or connect with us on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter. To download the software, please find it on Epomaker Website Download.
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10 Comments on Introducing Epomaker NT68 - Extremely Versatile Mechanical Keyboard With a Carrying Case

#1
FreedomEclipse
~Technological Technocrat~
I thought that was a CD poking out of a CD-Rom drive in the last picture.


Then i clicked on the picture and saw it was a phone.
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#2
Valantar
As with >95% of mech keyboard stuff, this just makes me depressed that ANSI is all that's available.
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#3
AnarchoPrimitiv
The smallest keyboards possible WHILE STILL HAVING arrow keys are my favorite, though I've always stuck to keyboards $90 and under because I'm very skeptical about whether a $100+ keyboard will feel like such a noticeably better experience that it warrants spending that much.
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#4
lynx29
FreedomEclipseI thought that was a CD poking out of a CD-Rom drive in the last picture.


Then i clicked on the picture and saw it was a phone.
you made me do a double take!!! lol it really does. wow. CD's are making a comeback boys!!!! :roll: Actually my car I just got super cheap used has a CD player in it and I am thankful for it. There is something about disconnecting from smartphones/internet and just rowing down the windows and jamming I really love.
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#5
Tartaros
ValantarAs with >95% of mech keyboard stuff, this just makes me depressed that ANSI is all that's available.
It wouldn't be a problem if they released other languages on that format but they don't, even if there are keycaps for ANSI in different languages in Aliexpress. They don't even have to do a multiple ISO/ANSI board, they just need to do fucking keycaps xD.
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#6
Valantar
TartarosIt wouldn't be a problem if they released other languages on that format but they don't, even if there are keycaps for ANSI in different languages in Aliexpress. They don't even have to do a multiple ISO/ANSI board, they just need to do fucking keycaps xD.
Well, as a Nordic ISO user I would really struggle to adapt to a bastardized "Nordic ANSI" as it would move quite a few keys around. I guess I could live with it, but yeah, options are really scarce. And Keychron just keeps postponing the launches of ever more of their ISO versions too :/
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#7
Tartaros
ValantarWell, as a Nordic ISO user I would really struggle to adapt to a bastardized "Nordic ANSI" as it would move quite a few keys around. I guess I could live with it, but yeah, options are really scarce. And Keychron just keeps postponing the launches of ever more of their ISO versions too :/
Is not really that different, in Spanish is just a couple of keys moved and 2 of them put on alt on other keys. What I mean is they really don't have to do anything too complicated like designing a board and plate for 2 layouts if they don't want to commit to it if the cost/benefit is too way off, just make ANSI keycaps for other languages and call it a day. But they don't even want to print some keycaps and have some small stock of them for the few people that might want their keyboards in different countries, that's the worst thing of all.


I recently bought a Dierya DK61 because I wanted to try a 60% with optical switches and I had to buy a set of keycaps. What bothers me is that is not really a big deal for makers to print keycaps and the people who doesn't live in US has to deal with crappy stuff from Aliexpress if they want a proper experience.
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#8
Valantar
TartarosIs not really that different, in Spanish is just a couple of keys moved and 2 of them put on alt on other keys. What I mean is they really don't have to do anything too complicated like designing a board and plate for 2 layouts if they don't want to commit to it if the cost/benefit is too way off, just make ANSI keycaps for other languages and call it a day. But they don't even want to print some keycaps and have some small stock of them for the few people that might want their keyboards in different countries, that's the worst thing of all.


I recently bought a Dierya DK61 because I wanted to try a 60% with optical switches and I had to buy a set of keycaps. What bothers me is that is not really a big deal for makers to print keycaps and the people who doesn't live in US has to deal with crappy stuff from Aliexpress if they want a proper experience.
I don't know, it might be different from us in the nordics with our 29-letter alphabets (though Spanish ISO has an ñ key, right?). ANSI doesn't actually have enough keys to work out properly for 29-letter alphabets, with the </> key next to left shift disappearing entirely (or being merged as a second modifier onto something else, which is complicated by ANSI also not having the AltGr key - though that's easily enough implemented by just using the right Alt for that). Not the biggest thing in the world, sure, but certainly annoying.
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#9
Selaya
Doesn't the right Alt get mapped to Alt Gr per default when you swap your input language to one using Alt Gr?
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#10
Tartaros
ValantarI don't know, it might be different from us in the nordics with our 29-letter alphabets (though Spanish ISO has an ñ key, right?). ANSI doesn't actually have enough keys to work out properly for 29-letter alphabets, with the </> key next to left shift disappearing entirely (or being merged as a second modifier onto something else, which is complicated by ANSI also not having the AltGr key - though that's easily enough implemented by just using the right Alt for that). Not the biggest thing in the world, sure, but certainly annoying.
SelayaDoesn't the right Alt get mapped to Alt Gr per default when you swap your input language to one using Alt Gr?
If you use an ISO layout on an ANSI keyboard the right alt becomes alt gr, that's it.

I didn't to do any crazy remap in the spanish ISO when using my keyboard, just change the keycaps and you are good to go. The only key that needs remapping is </> since I'm still using ISO layout and supposedly they become alt characters on keys , and . but they don't work like that in ISO, but all these keyboards have software to do that.



It's not that of a big deal, that's why I said they could just print some keycaps for other languages in this layout and at least have a bare minimum offer to the rest of the world instead of relying on low quality chinese parts. Look at that left shift and it's only 4 days since I changed the keycaps.
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