Friday, December 10th 2021

EM3 released the world's thinnest and lightest VR headset

EM3, a VR start-up company, recently released an ultra-thin VR glass prototype named Ether. The thickness of Ether is only 6.8 mm, and its weight is around 37 g. It is by far the lightest VR near eye display solution. Due to the current weight and size of the VR helmets, users will develop physiological discomfort after wearing them for about 20 minutes, limiting the applications to immersive VR games. Other Metaverse scenarios such as social networking, online education, training, design, conference, and convention, would request lighter yet smaller VR glass. Since 2014, numerous companies have been trying to reduce the thickness of VR headsets. However, limited by the principles of optics, it is difficult. Not until recently, companies using Pancake optics reduced the VR headset thickness to 25 mm in total and the weight of 160-180 g. Nevertheless, there is still a gap between VR headsets to VR glass.

The EM3 Ether prototype glass contains two micro-displays, 2560x2560 pixel resolution in full color. The FOV (field of view) per eye is 80° for now. EM3 claims that by using a larger format micro-display, the FOV per eye is expected to increase to 100° while the total thickness of the glass is unchanged. The Ether prototype adopts tethered design, which can be connected to a smartphone. According to EM3, Ether uses a unique near eye optical module, which converges full spectrum light within a short length to achieve precise imaging, therefore significantly reducing the VR glass's thickness. According to EM3, the company's goal is to launch its VR glass product Ether in late 2022.
Source: EM3
Add your own comment

11 Comments on EM3 released the world's thinnest and lightest VR headset

#1
Crackong
Looks more like an AR glass
Posted on Reply
#2
londiste
Low FOV, no blocking the light. AR, maybe.
Posted on Reply
#4
Chomiq
Looks like that display is pretty thicc.
Posted on Reply
#5
ArcanisGK507
they don't show how it looks from the user's perspective ... for a product like this it's a very important thing ...
Posted on Reply
#6
Soul_
ChomiqLooks like that display is pretty thicc.
It always has been...

Memes aside, unless it is an OLED, display panels will always be thick, due to the layers required to reproduce the image on an LCD.
ArcanisGK507they don't show how it looks from the user's perspective ... for a product like this it's a very important thing ...
I think you are right, but I do have a question. How would you actually show exactly what user is able to see? Since I don't know the answer, I thought I should ask.
Posted on Reply
#7
TechLurker
If these were integrated into those sporty sunglass-like shape that mostly wraps around the eyes (off the top of my head, the Oakley Jawbreaker line being one extreme example), and as a functional AR device, it'd be pretty useful as an assist device where it can auto magnify text within a certain range to the user as well as something like an always-worn sunglasses (Deus Ex style) that simply augments what you see (esp. the increased used of QR Code menus). Just tie it in with a VR glove for scrolling and swiping. Basically Google Glass or Microsoft's Hololens but far more stylish.
Posted on Reply
#8
ArcanisGK507
Soul_It always has been...

Memes aside, unless it is an OLED, display panels will always be thick, due to the layers required to reproduce the image on an LCD.



I think you are right, but I do have a question. How would you actually show exactly what user is able to see? Since I don't know the answer, I thought I should ask.
there are recording techniques to achieve this; It has already been implemented in NOPOR ... and in other industries ...
Posted on Reply
#9
Franzen4Real
TechLurkerIf these were integrated into those sporty sunglass-like shape that mostly wraps around the eyes (off the top of my head, the Oakley Jawbreaker line being one extreme example), and as a functional AR device, it'd be pretty useful as an assist device where it can auto magnify text within a certain range to the user as well as something like an always-worn sunglasses (Deus Ex style) that simply augments what you see (esp. the increased used of QR Code menus). Just tie it in with a VR glove for scrolling and swiping. Basically Google Glass or Microsoft's Hololens but far more stylish.
I have always thought that AR sunglasses would be nice as a walking GPS, and also in making a lot more use of QR codes than what we see today like you mentioned. I have tried the first gen Hololens, and while it is pretty cool, the "window" size in which you see the AR content overlaid with the real world is quite small. If they could make a 100 degree FOV 'window' for AR, that would be a huge step up.
Posted on Reply
#10
Soul_
ArcanisGK507there are recording techniques to achieve this; It has already been implemented in NOPOR ... and in other industries ...
That video shows nothing about recoding how a person is actually able to record what the person experiences. Recording a video stream vs recording the actual experience from user's perspective are two different things right? Unless, when you meant former, when you actually said latter.
Posted on Reply
#11
Broken Processor
I love the thought of VR but never got it because it's so limited in usage but when AR goes main stream I'll jump on it.
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment
May 28th, 2022 10:59 EDT change timezone

New Forum Posts

Popular Reviews

Controversial News Posts