Friday, January 14th 2022

Valve Set to Start Shipping its Steam Deck in February

For those that have placed an order for a Steam Deck, Valve had good news today, as barring any last minute issues due to the current conditions in the world, be that the pandemic, supply issues, shipping or some other unforeseen event, Valve should start shipments of the Steam Deck to its customers in February. The company didn't give much else in terms of information about what stage the production is in, but did at least give a small update on what's going on with regards to the software side of things.

Valve provided a photo of several development devices running their latest production build of the SteamOS, which appears to show some kind of test or diagnostics screen. The company is apparently also busy working on its Steam Deck Verified program to make sure that as many games as possible will work with the SteamOS and Steam Deck once it arrives in the hands of its customers. As such, Valve has been seeding more developer units to game developers and the company doesn't appear to have been stingy either, as it claims to have sent "hundreds" of units in the last month and is apparently approving and shipping further units to more developers. It'll be interesting to see if the Steam Deck can win over conventional PC gamers to a more portable device or not and how well games will play on it in the end.
Source: Valve
Add your own comment

18 Comments on Valve Set to Start Shipping its Steam Deck in February

#1
awesomesauce
i wish they would have ship a new game with the console too..

Posted on Reply
#2
TechLurker
This would be pretty convenient for all the JRPGs and similar Turn-Based games I own but run on a laptop as a sort of "mobile console". I do wonder though if it'd be possible to install some non-game apps into the device, like a music player or vanity elements like Wallpaper Engine.
Posted on Reply
#3
AusWolf
"It'll be interesting to see if the Steam Deck can win over conventional PC gamers to a more portable device or not and how well games will play on it in the end."

Nothing can win over the convenience and customizability of PC, especially not a portable console with a small screen. For holidays, it will be nice, though.
Posted on Reply
#4
Selaya
but the steam deck is a pc (okay, more like laptop but you get the gist), just in a handheld formfactor ...
Posted on Reply
#5
AusWolf
Selayabut the steam deck is a pc (okay, more like laptop but you get the gist), just in a handheld formfactor ...
That's why it's not a PC. Neither is a laptop a PC. These are totally different things made for different purposes in mind, even if their electronic components work on a similar principle.
Posted on Reply
#6
TheLostSwede
AusWolf"It'll be interesting to see if the Steam Deck can win over conventional PC gamers to a more portable device or not and how well games will play on it in the end."

Nothing can win over the convenience and customizability of PC, especially not a portable console with a small screen. For holidays, it will be nice, though.
Not even with the current GPU shortage?
Posted on Reply
#7
AusWolf
TheLostSwedeNot even with the current GPU shortage?
Good question, but I'd say no.

I was lucky enough to buy my RTX 2070 in the middle of the shortage through a random ebay auction that I didn't even intend to bid on at first. For people who are less lucky, AMD APUs are readily available. Game technologies aren't developing so fast that you would need the latest and greatest anyway. A GTX 980 - 1060 or RX 480 is still fine for 1080p. If you're happy to sacrifice some settings or scale down in resolution, you're OK with even less. Postponing a monitor upgrade is a good way to circumvent the GPU shortage. I remember when one had to buy an entirely new PC every two years just to be able to run the newest games, but those times are over. Much of our modern needs aren't needs, but artificially generated wants. Whoever says that one can't live without 4K 165 Hz and that 40-60 fps gaming is unacceptable is gravely mistaken.

Another thing is that a small screen and a few game controller buttons and sticks will never replace my 24" monitor and mechanical keyboard. Don't get me wrong, it's a fascinating piece of tech, and I'm very excited to read the first reviews, but it's not a PC replacement by far. :)
Posted on Reply
#8
Liquid Cool
I plan on using it...as a pc.

Looking forward to seeing the docking station they pair it with.

Best,

LC
Posted on Reply
#9
ShurikN
AusWolfThat's why it's not a PC. Neither is a laptop a PC. These are totally different things made for different purposes in mind, even if their electronic components work on a similar principle.
I think you are confusing the broad term Personal Computer (PC) with "Desktop PC".
Posted on Reply
#10
AusWolf
ShurikNI think you are confusing the broad term Personal Computer (PC) with "Desktop PC".
If you think about it that broadly, then everything is a PC nowadays. Even your car, or your TV. Or the screen on smart fridges and stuff. I'm too oldschool for such definitions of "PC". :ohwell:
Posted on Reply
#11
ShurikN
AusWolfIf you think about it that broadly, then everything is a PC nowadays. Even your car, or your TV. Or the screen on smart fridges and stuff. I'm too oldschool for such definitions of "PC". :ohwell:
That's why different terms were created, desktop, laptop, smartphone etc.
If someone says they are gonna run their Steam Deck as a PC (and not only a handheld gaming device) they are not wrong, it fits the broad term.
Saying a laptop is not a PC however, is factually wrong.
Posted on Reply
#12
TheoneandonlyMrK
You can plug a keyboard mouse and monitor in , run Windows on it and hopefully any x86 application, it's also portable and a Linux based gaming platform.
I'd class that as close to a pc as a laptop and considerably more so than any set top box ,car or fridge.
And I sure as hell will be messing with one heavily , one day :).
Posted on Reply
#13
Bigshrimp
It is literally a Small Form Factor (SFF) PC in the shape of a controller. :P
Posted on Reply
#14
NC37
Liquid CoolI plan on using it...as a pc.

Looking forward to seeing the docking station they pair it with.

Best,

LC
As is the same advantage I see. They've said you can run Windows on it and given no reason why you'd want their OS over it. Trouble is the storage, while expandable, is limited right now because of it isn't a common size. Once more get made and for retail, should see those prices drop. Course, by then they'll likely have a 2nd gen Deck out with better specs anyways.

Valve almost had me a buyer on this one if it wasn't for that one issue.
Posted on Reply
#15
DeathtoGnomes
AusWolfThat's why it's not a PC. Neither is a laptop a PC. These are totally different things made for different purposes in mind, even if their electronic components work on a similar principle.
Laptops are counted as PCs in most statistics, and I agree with you.
Posted on Reply
#16
Imouto
You gotta be kidding to say a laptop isn't a PC.

You'd expect an enthusiast community to know better and at the same time you know it's bound to happen. Sheeesh...
Posted on Reply
#17
LabRat 891
Starting to get antsy @ the wait. I have a reservation on a base model unit. Not really an expense I needed. However, assuming I don't break it, it doesn't brick itself, and doesn't get stolen, it'll be a very neat collectable someday (success or failure, commercially).
Reserved on Fri, October 15, 2021
Your expected order availability: After Q2 2022
Posted on Reply
#18
amarthar
TechLurkerI do wonder though if it'd be possible to install some non-game apps into the device, like a music player or vanity elements like Wallpaper Engine.
Steam already has a built in music player. It's safe to assume that SteamOS will have one as well.
Posted on Reply
Add your own comment