Tuesday, May 3rd 2022

Verbatim Launches Write Once SSD in Japan

Every once in a while, a really odd product pops up and Verbatim's new write once SSD is such a product at first glance. The product is called SWOVA128G and the model name gives away that it's a 128 GB drive. As it's an external drive, it connects via USB-C 3.2 Gen 1, which is technically a regular old USB 3.0 port. Considering the read speed is a mere 540 MB/s this isn't going to hamper the performance. The write speed is a mere 180 MB/s, although don't expect to be storing data to this SSD using just any device, as Verbatim requires a full-fat version of Windows 10 or 11 running on an x86/x64 based CPU, with Microsoft's.NET Framework 4.8 or later installed.

Verbatim provides a custom piece of software for writing data to the SSD, although the company hasn't provided any screenshots of said software, so it's unclear as to what it looks like. The idea behind the SWOVA128G is for it to be used in place of optical media in situations where copies of data have to be made, but where it can't be changed at a later point in time. According to Verbatim this includes things like company ledgers and electronic bookkeeping, backup and offline storage of confidential data and for things like disc images. Once the data has been stored on the SSD, it can be read by any device that supports exFAT. Although Verbatim provides a 10 year warranty, they don't guarantee the data retention. The company didn't release any pricing.
Source: Verbatim
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18 Comments on Verbatim Launches Write Once SSD in Japan

#1
Spencer LeBlanc
Wonder how the cells hold the data, after being powered off multiple years?
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#2
TheDeeGee
While SSDs are nice and fast, i will forever be storing cold/offline backups on traditional HHDs. Even if something breaks in a HDD, recovery is always possible if you're willing to spend the money at an expert.
Posted on Reply
#3
TheLostSwede
Spencer LeBlancWonder how the cells hold the data, after being powered off multiple years?
Well, it's a write once device and according to Verbatim, the data can't be erased.
They don't provide any more information, except saying that the only way to delete the data is to destroy the drive.
Posted on Reply
#4
IvanP91v
Spencer LeBlancWonder how the cells hold the data, after being powered off multiple years?
Thats an interesting question. I've been using M-Discs in both DVD and BD-R variety (up to 100GB) because at least those are intended for long term data archival.

But optical media is harder and harder to come by, which is expected.

But you bring up a good question. How long is the drive expected to retain the data?

(Verbatim's are the ones making 100GB BD-R XL M-Discs)
Posted on Reply
#5
DeathtoGnomes
TheLostSwedeWell, it's a write once device and according to Verbatim, the data can't be erased.
They don't provide any more information, except saying that the only way to delete the data is to destroy the drive.
So...CD/DVD write only nightmares will return... :shadedshu:
Posted on Reply
#6
TheLostSwede
IvanP91vThats an interesting question. I've been using M-Discs in both DVD and BD-R variety (up to 100GB) because at least those are intended for long term data archival.

But optical media is harder and harder to come by, which is expected.

But you bring up a good question. How long is the drive expected to retain the data?

(Verbatim's are the ones making 100GB BD-R XL M-Discs)
Verbatim was one of the top makers of optical media. They used to provide free discs when I was doing optical drive reviews many, many years ago. Great company to work with in that sense too.
Posted on Reply
#7
Chaitanya
DeathtoGnomesSo...CD/DVD write only nightmares will return... :shadedshu:
Write only flash media isn't new, Sandisk used to make WORM(write once read many) for law enforcement few years back. These drives maybe same target market of Law enforcement.
www.engadget.com/2008-07-15-sandisk-introduces-write-once-worm-sd-cards.html
www.engadget.com/2010-06-23-sandisks-1gb-worm-sd-card-stores-forensic-images-longer-than-yo.html

(Unfortunately since WDs takeover of Sandisk, all their old pages are dead by now including articles on how WORM worked)
Posted on Reply
#8
MIRTAZAPINE
IvanP91vThats an interesting question. I've been using M-Discs in both DVD and BD-R variety (up to 100GB) because at least those are intended for long term data archival.

But optical media is harder and harder to come by, which is expected.

But you bring up a good question. How long is the drive expected to retain the data?

(Verbatim's are the ones making 100GB BD-R XL M-Discs)
I used to backup on tons of dvd back in the day with Verbatim. I guess depends on the type of flash used if they are SLC most likely over a decade. Optical media is good for achieve but the problem with them for the longterm is the devices to read them may get less and less.
Posted on Reply
#9
Tigger
I'm the only one
Weird
Posted on Reply
#10
oobymach
TiggerWeird
Not really, most optical media (cdr-dvd-r etc) is write once but over time discs can degrade where a small memory stick probably won't and optical media is less and less common now with re-writable memory sticks in abundance.

If it's written once only the data can't be changed so nobody can forge old records and storing them would be much easier as they take up a lot less space and require less careful handling than optical media.
Posted on Reply
#11
DeathtoGnomes
oobymachbut over time discs can degrade
True but things like these are subject to magnetic field proximity, discs were not. Thats why they wont guarantee data retention.
Posted on Reply
#12
TheinsanegamerN
Spencer LeBlancWonder how the cells hold the data, after being powered off multiple years?
Well this is still NAND, just NAND with write once firmware. So just as poorly as any other SSD.
Posted on Reply
#13
Shihabyooo
What's the point of a 10 years warranty for if they can't guarantee data retention? If the data on it got corrupted, then it's just a [very light] brick!
TheDeeGeeWhile SSDs are nice and fast, i will forever be storing cold/offline backups on traditional HHDs. Even if something breaks in a HDD, recovery is always possible if you're willing to spend the money at an expert.
Plus having ~half the cost/GB gives you the option to have redundant backups.
Posted on Reply
#14
R-T-B
DeathtoGnomesTrue but things like these are subject to magnetic field proximity, discs were not. Thats why they wont guarantee data retention.
They also need to be periodically electrically refreshed (powered on basically) every few years/decades/whatever the cell retention span is, or data is lost.

I'm with the others, if they can't promise data retention or at least give figures, this is useless.
TheinsanegamerNWell this is still NAND, just NAND with write once firmware. So just as poorly as any other SSD.
Which actually isn't that bad. You're looking at several years at minimum for the worst QLC garbage out there. But may still be unsuitable for the roles they are targeting here.
Posted on Reply
#16
Mussels
Freshwater Moderator
Ah yes, just what i wanted

An SSD with TBW of 0
Posted on Reply
#17
Watermelon5
TheLostSwedeWell, it's a write once device and according to Verbatim, the data can't be erased.
They don't provide any more information, except saying that the only way to delete the data is to destroy the drive.
SSDs, being traditionally known for data going poof after several years without power though...
Posted on Reply
#18
Mussels
Freshwater Moderator
Could a CMOS battery keep an SSD's data alive for years to decades?
Posted on Reply
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