Monday, June 20th 2022

Samsung Launches ViewFinity S8 High Resolution Monitor

Samsung Electronics today announced the global launch of ViewFinity S8, a high resolution monitor specialized for creative professionals including content creators, graphic designers and more. ViewFinity, a portmanteau of "View" and "Infinity" is the new name for Samsung's high resolution monitor lineup, meaning 'The Value of Infinite Viewing Experience', and showcases Samsung's ambition to establish a new benchmark for high resolution monitors.

"ViewFinity is the summation of Samsung's goal to deliver the most precise and functional monitors to businesses who require pinpoint accuracy and consistency throughout their work," said Hyesung Ha, Executive Vice President of Visual Display Business at Samsung Electronics. "We are proud to offer this monitor to designers, artists and professionals who will use our technology to create new ideas and experiences that realize their full potential."
The Samsung ViewFinity S8 is available in 32" and 27" models to give high performance in the most popular screen sizes. Pro-grade UHD resolution is combined with a wide color gamut up to 98% of DCI-P3 and Video Electronics Standards Association (VESA) DisplayHDR 600 for more range, accuracy and nuance. Professional factory calibration ensures up to one billion colors are projected in crystal clarity on the IPS panel, which creates vibrant color reproduction and contrast while working on the most complex visual and design projects.

Moreover, Samsung ViewFinity S8 received the 'PANTONE Validated' recognition in display from PANTONE — meaning the models authentically reproduce more than 2,000 colors as well as the newly added 110 skin tone shades which can be found in the PANTONE SkinTone Guide.

As the world's first UL verified Glare Free monitor, Matte Display is applied on the top of the panel, reducing light reflection even when not using a monitor hood to provide a distraction-free working environment. This is enhanced by the wide viewing angle allowing users to see images clearly from any angle. Plus, ViewFinity S8 earned the CES 2022 Innovation Award Honoree in the Computer Peripherals & Accessories category in recognition of Samsung's ongoing efforts to deliver considerable benefits to its customers.

Samsung has developed and applied a new material, made with repurposed ocean-bound plastics, to the ViewFinity S8 to reduce marine waste and minimize the environmental footprint while using more recycled plastics to produce its display products than it did in 2021. Samsung's Eco Savings Plus technology also reduces pixel brightness in sections of an image with black pixels for up to a 10% reduction in power consumption. In fact, ViewFinity S8 is TCO Certified for its product design based on specific social and environmental responsibility requirements, as its product lifecycle also contributes to the circular economy.

The ViewFinity S8 offers increased functionality to create efficient workflows. It can be used as an all-in-one dock for desktops or laptops for simplified workstations at home or the office. Also, users can connect the monitor with a single USB Type-C cable enables display signals, 10 Gbps data transfers, fast internet speeds via an Ethernet connection and fast charging with up to 90 W power. The VESA-compatible design maximizes space efficiency, allowing users to adjust, tilt, swivel and pivot the monitor into the perfect ergonomic position. Furthermore, the ViewFinity S8 offers certification from TÜV Rheinland for Intelligent Eye Care, Adaptive Picture for optimized quality in any viewing environment, Eye Saver Mode and Flicker Free technology.

The ViewFinity monitors include the newly released models and nine other products with QHD or higher resolution — 2022 models (S80PB, S61B) and 2021 models (S95UA, S80UA, S80A, S70A, S65UA, S60UA, S60A).

Availability

Samsung's new high resolution monitor, ViewFinity S8, will be available globally from the end of June, with launch schedules varying by region.
Source: Samsung
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14 Comments on Samsung Launches ViewFinity S8 High Resolution Monitor

#1
bug
Once again, a mention of DisplayHDR, but no word on the dimming solution. I would have loved a 32" DisplayHDR600 UHD monitor a year ago when I bought one, but nothing was available. Probably still isn't.
Posted on Reply
#2
Tomorrow
QHD or higher?

Thats pretty vague. If high resolution is the primary focus and scaling is not a concern i would expect 8K in 2022 not QHD or even 4K.
Posted on Reply
#3
bug
TomorrowQHD or higher?

Thats pretty vague. If high resolution is the primary focus and scaling is not a concern i would expect 8K in 2022 not QHD or even 4K.
It says UHD in the article ;)
Posted on Reply
#5
ModEl4
bugOnce again, a mention of DisplayHDR, but no word on the dimming solution. I would have loved a 32" DisplayHDR600 UHD monitor a year ago when I bought one, but nothing was available. Probably still isn't.
Out of curiosity i checked Geizhals, there are many models starting from 439€, some of them existed before 1-3 years, but as the requirements go up so is the price, for example for high refresh rate it's around 700€ or more (for example the new Dell G3223Q) but no Samsung brand amongst them.
Posted on Reply
#6
Tek-Check
TomorrowQHD or higher?

Thats pretty vague. If high resolution is the primary focus and scaling is not a concern i would expect 8K in 2022 not QHD or even 4K.
What would you need 8K monitor for?
Posted on Reply
#7
Chaitanya
Tek-CheckWhat would you need 8K monitor for?
Also 8K at conventional sizes is downright overkill and on windows scaling of UI would be horrendous. I can only think of video editing(there are many 8k cameras these days) one reason for needing 8K monitors.
Posted on Reply
#8
bug
ModEl4Out of curiosity i checked Geizhals, there are many models starting from 439€, some of them existed before 1-3 years, but as the requirements go up so is the price, for example for high refresh rate it's around 700€ or more (for example the new Dell G3223Q) but no Samsung brand amongst them.
Those are junk when it comes to HDR, they come with something like 16 or 32 dimming zones.

For the record, this is how poor dimming looks like:
(I know that's a TV, monitors usually have it worse.)
Posted on Reply
#9
ModEl4
bugThose are junk when it comes to HDR, they come with something like 16 or 32 dimming zones.

For the record, this is how poor dimming looks like:
(I know that's a TV, monitors usually have it worse.)
Sure, although HDR certified, their implementation isn't at all satisfactory.
As i said as requirements go up, so the price, for example for 576 local dimming zones a ASUS ProArt PA32UCR-K starts at 1299€.
Posted on Reply
#10
bug
ModEl4Sure, although HDR certified, their implementation isn't at all satisfactory.
As i said as requirements go up, so the price, for example for 576 local dimming zones a ASUS ProArt PA32UCR-K starts at 1299€.
I know.
And then you realize that when 4k is ~8MPixels and the monitor offers 576 dimming zones, each zone still controls almost 14k pixels. I mean, I'm not expecting OLED-like HDR, but for that kind of money 14,000 pixels is still too much.
And like I said, this announcement doesn't talk about the dimming solution at all. Which means is yet another crappy implementation, turning this monitor into a plain old wide-gamut monitor, with no relevant HDR capabilities.
Posted on Reply
#11
SOAREVERSOR
Tek-CheckWhat would you need 8K monitor for?
Editing. If you're doing photo or video work 8k is good. Even if you are just doing 4k video.
Posted on Reply
#12
Tomorrow
Tek-CheckWhat would you need 8K monitor for?
I wouldn't. But if high resolution is the primary focus then releasing 4K monitor is a joke. We have had 4K monitors for half a decade now. We even have 240Hz models, calibrated ones, HDR1000 ones etc.
ChaitanyaAlso 8K at conventional sizes is downright overkill and on windows scaling of UI would be horrendous. I can only think of video editing(there are many 8k cameras these days) one reason for needing 8K monitors.
Yes Windows scaling sucks. Especially with older programs.
Posted on Reply
#13
Tek-Check
SOAREVERSOREditing. If you're doing photo or video work 8k is good. Even if you are just doing 4k video.
Sure, 8K is quite niche, almost nmon-existent. A few pros from studios might be happy with it, but I am not sure how much demand is out there.
My impression is that monitors will ramp up towards 5K, 6K and beyond next year, once DP 2.0 is fully out on next gen GPUs.
TomorrowI wouldn't. But if high resolution is the primary focus then releasing 4K monitor is a joke. We have had 4K monitors for half a decade now. We even have 240Hz models, calibrated ones, HDR1000 ones etc.
Releasing 4K monitor with minimal specs is a joke. That's what you probably wanted to say. Full spec 4K monitors are still very, very expensive and this is the next barrier in consumer space that needs to fall in price before any adventures into higher resolutions. 8K with basic spec would look equally awful, if not worse. Who needs that? Even HDR1000 monitors are not that good if not matched well with other important features.

4K monitor is great if followed by other features, such as FALD with 1152 zones, 10-bit native image, DCI above 95%, BT.2020 ~85%, support for several HDR standards, not just HDR10, etc. Dolby Vision is very rare on monitors. Only a handful of super expensive Asus ProArt UCG monitors have it.

4K monitors still have a lot of features to perfect, feratures that several TVs have already managed to deliver.
Posted on Reply
#14
IronHand_Astarte
TomorrowOnly 4K. What a joke.
A poor one but I agree, a bad joke.. Wake me when we hit 8K at >144hz, 43" and DP 2.xx
Posted on Reply
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