Friday, February 6th 2009

Galaxy Non-Reference GeForce GTX260+ Spotted

Pictures of the one of the first indigenously designed PCB for the GeForce GTX 260 by Galaxy has been pictured by Chinese website PCPop.com, that show a distinct blue PCB and cooling system. Galaxy chooses to call this accelerator the GTX 260+, perhaps to indicate that it is the newest version (55nm, 216 SP), which the marking on the GPU validates. The accelerator seems to be exclusive for the Asian market. The PCB uses a five phase power circuit. All the memory chips are on the anterior end of the PCB.

The cooling system of the card consists of heatsinks over key components of the PCB: the NVIO2 processor, the VRM area and the memory chips. The GPU is cooled by a massive cooler that can trick you for a CPU cooler. It seems to span across at least three slots. It consists of a contact block from which four heat pipes emerge, that convey heat to large aluminum fin array that is cooled by what looks like a 120mm LED-lit fan. The accelerator is backed by Galaxy's Magic Panel software that monitors the various parameters of the card and controls them. In the first screen-shot below, the core seems to be set at 750 MHz (core), 1575 MHz (shader) and 1300/2600 DDR MHz (memory), with a certain temperature reading (most likely the core) showing a temperature of 43 °C. The card secured a 3DMark Vantage score of P14480 on a Core i7-based test bench. The card also dealt with an ongoing FurMark session where at the same speeds, it was running at 67 °C, showing the cooling efficiency of this card.

Source: PCPop
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32 Comments on Galaxy Non-Reference GeForce GTX260+ Spotted

#1
squallho1
Galaxy Representative
Mussels said:
it needs to be two slots, with the third slot for air to the fan. Otherwise its not going to fit in many systems.
Indeed our target would be 2.5 slots including the fan to leave some space for fresh air, like some of the solutions in the market.
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#2
Duffman
That would definately be more feasible. I'm sure it would lose much of that cooling power though.
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#3
p_o_s_pc
F@H&WCG addict
looks like a card i would like to have. That cooler looks to be overkill and i am all about overkill :D
Posted on Reply
#4
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
squallho1 said:
Our mass production model will use more "generic" heatsink design, more details coming once spec is finalized.
The newer, compact heatsink may compromise the cooling efficiency. This cooler has shown some of the best cooling efficiency figures for a GTX 260 running at speeds as high as 750/1575 MHz. The test only ends up popularising the PCC HP4-1226.
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#5
Duffman
If anyone can fit it in their case...
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#6
squallho1
Galaxy Representative
btarunr said:
The newer, compact heatsink may compromise the cooling efficiency. This cooler has shown some of the best cooling efficiency figures for a GTX 260 running at speeds as high as 750/1575 MHz. The test only ends up popularising the PCC HP4-1226.
That's true, however most users will only consider max. of 3 slots as "acceptable". And this requires much redesign work to be done, so our first batch of the cards will most probably use other cooling solutions available.
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#7
Mussels
Moderprator
maybe you shoudl consider having heatsink on both sides of the card. you could make it 1 or 2 slots thinner, if you have a passive heatsink on top, taking some of hte heat away.
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