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SilverStone Intros Tundra RGB Series Liquid CPU Coolers

SilverStone today introduced the Tundra RGB series all-in-one liquid CPU coolers, with the TD-02 RGB and the TD-03 RGB. These aren't mere RGB refits of the TD-02 and TD-03, but complete redesigns to the Asetek platform. You now get the swivel fittings that Asetek holds patents on, along with completely redesigned pump-blocks and radiators. The TD-03 RGB features a 120 mm x 120 mm radiator, while the TD-02 RGB comes with 240 mm x 120 mm; both with 32 mm thickness, and a ridged aluminium radiator-fin design that improves heat dissipation. RGB LED lighting extends to not just a company logo on top of the pump-block, but also the included radiator fans. The included fans spin between 600 to 2,200 RPM, take PWM input, push up to 83.7 CFM of air, with a noise output of 15.3 to 34.8 dBA, each. Among the current-generation CPU sockets supported are LGA115x, LGA2066, and AM4.

AMD Announces 2nd Gen Ryzen Quad-core and Energy-Efficient Processor Models

AMD today announced the much-awaited 2nd generation Ryzen quad-core socket AM4 processors, in addition to two new E-series (energy-efficient) variants of its existing processor models. To begin with, the company announced the 4-core/8-thread Ryzen 5 2500X and the 4-core/4-thread Ryzen 3 2300X.

Unlike their predecessors that are carved out of the "Summit Ridge" silicon by disabling 2 cores per compute complex or CCX (2+2 CCX config), the 2500X and 2300X feature a 4+0 config, or an entire CCX in the "Pinnacle Ridge" silicon being disabled. This also means that the 2500X has just 8 MB of L3 cache (its predecessor has 16 MB). The 2300X is clocked at 3.50 GHz with 4.00 GHz boost, while the 2500X ticks at 3.60 GHz with 4.00 GHz boost. The TDP of both chips is rated at 65W.

AMD also released the "E" brand extension for its 2nd generation Ryzen series, with the new Ryzen 5 2600E, and the Ryzen 7 2700E. Both these chips sacrifice clock speeds for an impressive 45W TDP. The 2600E is clocked at 3.10 GHz, with 4.00 GHz (compared to 3.60 GHz ~ 4.20 GHz of the 2600X); while the 2700E ticks at 2.80 GHz, with 4.00 GHz boost (compared to 3.70 GHz ~ 4.30 GHz of the 2700X). The company didn't reveal pricing of the four chips.

AMD Announces "Zen" Based Athlon and 2nd Gen Ryzen PRO Desktop Processors

AMD today announced a reimagined family of AMD Athlon desktop processors with Radeon Vega graphics that have been optimized for everyday PC users: the AMD Athlon 200GE, Athlon 220GE, and Athlon 240GE processor. Combining the high-performance x86 "Zen" core and "Vega"] graphics architectures in a versatile System-on-Chip (SOC) design, the Athlon desktop processors offer responsive and reliable computing for a wide range of experiences, from day-to-day needs like web browsing and video streaming through more advanced workloads like high-definition PC gaming. Complementing this news, AMD announced the availability of the commercial-grade Athlon PRO 200GE desktop processor, along with three 2nd Gen Ryzen PRO desktop processor models for the commercial, enterprise, and the public sector: the Ryzen 7 PRO 2700X, Ryzen 7 PRO 2700, and Ryzen 5 PRO 2600 processors. With these new introductions, AMD now offers a top-to-bottom line-up of professional-grade computing solutions for experiences that range from premium content creation to advanced multitasking and office productivity.

"We are proud to expand our successful "Zen" core-based consumer and commercial product portfolios today with the addition of AMD Athlon, AMD Athlon PRO, and 2nd Gen AMD Ryzen PRO desktop processors. The new Athlon desktop processors, now incorporating the advanced "Zen" core and "Vega"3 graphics architectures, energize a legendary processor brand in AMD Athlon - a brand that consumers and PC enthusiasts alike trusted throughout nearly two decades of innovation," said Saeid Moshkelani, senior vice president and general manager, Client Compute, AMD. "Additionally, we are continuing to offer business PC users more processing power than we ever have before with the launch of 2nd Gen Ryzen PRO desktop processors into the commercial market."

AMD Readies 2nd Generation Ryzen Pro Socket AM4 Processors

AMD is readying its second generation Ryzen Pro socket AM4 processors targeted at commercial desktops in a corporate environment, with additional management and security features. These chips are based on the company's new 12 nm "Pinnacle Ridge" silicon. Its biggest differentiator from the other Ryzen SKUs is the GuardMI feature, which is a collective of Secure Memory Encryption, a hardened Secure Boot feature, Secure Production Environment (useful for big organizations that oversee the manufacturing of their hardware, and fTPM.

AMD's 2nd gen Ryzen Pro lineup initially includes three models: the 8-core/16-thread Ryzen 7 Pro 2700X, the Ryzen 7 Pro 2700, and the 6-core/12-thread Ryzen 5 Pro 2600. Some of these chips are clocked marginally lower than their non-Pro siblings. The Pro 2700X ticks at 3.60 GHz, with 4.10 GHz (vs. 3.70 to 4.30 GHz of the 2700X); while the Pro 2700 and Pro 2600 are clocked on par with its non-Pro counterparts. The decision behind clocking the Pro 2700X lower could have something to do with TDP, which is now 95W, compared to the 105W of the normal 2700X.

AMD Athlon Pro 200GE Detailed: An Extremely Cut-down "Raven Ridge" at $55

AMD is giving finishing touches to its Athlon Pro 200GE socket AM4 SoC, which it could position against Intel's $50-ish Celeron LGA1151 SKUs. Leaked slides by PCEva reveals that it's a heavily cut-down 14 nm "Raven Ridge" die. For starters, unlike previous-generation Athlon-branded products on platforms such as FM2, the Athlon 200GE won't lack integrated graphics. Only 3 out of 11 Vega NGCUs will be enabled, translating to 192 stream processors, which should be enough for desktop, 2D, and video acceleration, but not serious gaming, even at low resolutions.

The CPU config is 2-core/4-thread, with 512 KB L2 cache per core, and 4 MB shared L3 cache. The CPU is clocked at 3.20 GHz, with no Precision Boost features. You still get GuardMI commercial-grade hardware security features. There is a big catch with one of its uncore components. The PCIe root-complex only supports PCI-Express 3.0 x4 out of your motherboard's topmost x16 slot, not even x8. Ryzen "Raven Ridge" APUs already offer a crippled x8 connectivity through this slot. AMD claims that the Athlon 200GE will be "up to 19 percent faster" than Intel Pentium G4560 at productivity work. When it launches on 6th September with market availability from 18th September, the Athlon Pro 200GE will be priced at USD $55.

Alpenföhn Intros Two Premium Variants of the Brocken 3 CPU Cooler

Alpenföhn today introduced the 3rd generation Brocken tower-type CPU air coolers in two premium variants - White Edition and Black Edition. These coolers are characterized with a refined anodized aluminium fin-stack design that's more wavy and asymmetric, to minimize sideways "bleeding" of intake air before it passes through the entire area of the fin to pick up heat. The designers also took the opportunity to add a new SECC-steel top-plate, and a fin-stack offset design that improves memory area clearance.

Five 6 mm-thick copper heat-pipes make direct contact with the CPU at the base, conveying heat through the fin-stack, which is then ventilated by a pair of 140 mm fans in push-pull configuration. These Wing Boost 3 fans take in 4-pin PWM input, spin between 400 to 1,500 RPM, pushing 103 m³h of air, with 22 dBA typical noise output, each. The cooler is capable of handling thermal loads of up to 220W, and supports sockets AM4, LGA2066, and LGA115x. Measuring 146 mm x 125 mm x 165 mm (WxDxH), the cooler weighs 1.02 kg, including fans. Available later this month, the Brocken 3 Black Edition and White Edition variants could be priced around 50€ (incl VAT).

XIGMATEK Intros Apache Plus Top-flow CPU Cooler

XIGMATEK today introduced the Apache Plus, an entry-level top-flow CPU cooler that looks more expensive than it is. Its design involves a radially-projecting anodized aluminium fin-stack that's bunched up at the center to make the base; and ventilated by a custom-design 120 mm fan. This fan features multi-color LEDs (not RGB), takes in 3-pin DC input, spins at around 1,600 RPM, pushing up to 89 CFM of air, with up to 22 dBA noise output. Supporting thermal loads of just up to 95W, the Apache Plus is just a quieter, better-looking replacement for your stock cooler. Measuring 123 mm x 123 mm x 125 mm (LxWxH), it weighs around 275 g. Both LGA115x and AM4 sockets are supported. Expect a sub-$20 price.

Thermalright Intros AXP-100 Full Copper CPU Cooler

The last time Thermalright gave a "Full Copper" twist to one of its bestselling CPU coolers was 10 years ago. The AXP-100 Full Copper sees the coming together of a pure copper fin-stack, six 6 mm exposed copper heat pipes, a copper base for indirect transfer to the heat pipes, and a reddish-orange fan. The height of the heatsink is 44 mm, which interestingly, is less than even that of the AXP-100 RH (reduced height) variant. The heatsink measures 108 mm x 121 mm x 44 mm (WxDxH), weighing 640 g, almost double that of the AXP-100 RH, and about the same as the AXP-100 Muscle. The included TY-100 fan is a 120 mm spinner, with a range of 900 to 2,500 RPM, PWM input, 16 to 44.5 CFM air-flow, and 22 to 30 dBA noise output. Among the sockets supported are LGA2066, LGA115x, and AM4. The company didn't reveal pricing.

ASRock Intros X370 Pro BTC+ Motherboard

Cryptocurrency mining rig motherboards have, until now, mostly been based on the Intel platform because Intel chipsets put out more PCIe lanes than AMD ones, and because Intel's sub-$100 Pentium/Celeron chips don't have narrower PCIe connectivity from the CPU. ASRock apparently has a lot of unsold AMD X370 chipset inventory, and with the possible introduction of sub-$100 Ryzen chips that have 28 PCIe lanes from the CPU, a use-case has emerged for a mining motherboard based on this platform. We hence have the X370 Pro BTC+. The board features an AM4 socket, with out of the box support for "Pinnacle Ridge" processors. The socket is wired to just one DDR4 DIMM slot, but all eight PCI-Express 3.0 x16 slots.

The topmost x16 slot runs at electrical gen 3.0 x4, while the remaining seven slots are gen 3.0 x1, taking advantage of PCIe segmentation of the X370 platform. The board draws power from three 24-pin ATX, 8+4 pin EPS, and a number of Molex outputs, although most of these power connectors are optional. A point to note here is that the D-sub/HDMI display outputs only work if an A-series "Bristol Ridge" or Ryzen "Raven Ridge" APU is used (which have fewer PCIe lanes), so you're bound to take display output from one of the 8 graphics cards. A 1 GbE interface and two USB 3.0 ports make for the rest of it.

ADATA to Showcase Its Latest Innovations at IFA 2018

ADATA Technology, a leading manufacturer of high-performance DRAM modules and NAND flash products, today announces that it will be showcasing its latest products and solutions at IFA 2018 in Berlin (Messe Berlin, IFA My Media, Hall 17, stand 120). Among the products to be on show will be ADATA's latest XPG gaming hardware including RGB DDR4 memory modules, PCIe SSDs, and accessories. In addition, its new high-capacity A1-rated microSDXC memory card and rugged external hard disk drive (HDD) will be on hand.

"We look forward to being at IFA 2018 and showcasing our latest portfolio of products, ranging from gaming hardware to storage solutions," said Peter Wu, Managing Director of ADATA's European operations. "As a key consumer electronics event located in the heart of Europe, IFA will give us the opportunity to demonstrate why we continue to be a leader in DRAM and NAND flash products, but also show how we are leveraging our core competencies to expand our presence in the region, especially in terms of gaming and eSports."

GIGABYTE Intros B450-I Aorus Pro WiFi Motherboard

GIGABYTE introduced an Aorus-branded, quasi-premium mini-ITX motherboard based on AMD B450 chipset, for socket AM4 processors, the B450-I Aorus Pro WiFi. The board draws power from a combination of 24-pin ATX and 8-pin EPS, conditioning it for the SoC with a lean 4+2 phase VRM. The AM4 SoC is wired to two DDR4 DIMM slots, supporting up to 32 GB of dual-channel DDR4 memory; and the board's lone PCI-Express 3.0 x16 slot.

Storage connectivity on the B450-I Aorus Pro WiFi includes an M.2-2280 slot with PCI-Express 3.0 x4 and SATA 6 Gbps wiring; and four SATA 6 Gbps ports. USB connectivity includes six USB 3.0 ports (four on the rear panel, two by headers); and two USB 3.1 gen 2 (both on the rear panel). With just 6-channel jacks, the onboard audio solution may look cheap, but is redeemed by Realtek ALC1220 CODEC. The Intel 9260 adapter is at the helm of wireless networking, with 802.11ac + Bluetooth 5.0, while GbE is handled by Intel i211AT. There's also some RGB LED fun to be had, with two 4-pin ARGB headers, and a small 8-pixel diffuser behind the PCB. GIGABYTE could price this board around $120.

EK Water Blocks Releases CPU Monoblock for ASRock X470 Taichi Series

EK Water Blocks, the premium computer liquid cooling gear manufacturer, is releasing a new AM4 socket based monoblock tailor-made for the ASRock X470 Taichi and ASRock X470 Taichi Ultimate motherboards. The EK-FB ASRock X470 Taichi RGB Monoblock has an integrated 4-pin RGB LED strip and it offers unparalleled aesthetics alongside with superior performance and VRM section cooling! The RGB LED in the monoblock is compatible with ASRock Polychrome RGB, thus offering a full lighting customization experience.

The EK-FB ASRock X470 Taichi RGB is a complete all-in-one (CPU and motherboard) liquid cooling solution for the ASRock X470 Taichi and ASRock X470 Taichi Ultimate motherboards that support the second generation of AMD Ryzen and 7th Generation A-series/Athlon processors.

CRYORIG Releases New Dual Fan Versions of Best Sellers H7 Plus and M9 Plus

Enthusiast thermal solutions brand CRYORIG releases the new H7 Plus and M9 Plus dual fan heatsinks. Based on the best-selling H7 and M9i/a, CRYORIG is now offering these two models with a direct dual fan upgrade for best in class performance. Adding an additional fan makes the overall heatsink airflow even better optimized to expel heat directly into the rear system fan and out of the PC case. With an included PWM Y-Cable, users can have both front and back fan speed synced together for optimal efficiency.

Lenovo Confirms AMD Ryzen 3 2300X and Ryzen 5 2500X Specs

Lenovo put up an updated specs sheet of its ThinkCentre M725 small form-factor desktop, with more processor options. Notable additions to these include the upcoming AMD Ryzen 3 2300X and Ryzen 5 2500X quad-core socket AM4 processors. The two chips succeed the 1300X and 1500X, respectively, and are designed to capture sub-$150 price-points, competing with Intel's Core i3 "Coffee Lake" quad-core processor series. It's rumored that the 2300X could even be priced close to the $100-mark, making it competitive with the i3-8100, while the 2500X could be priced competitively with the i3-8300.

AMD is giving these quad-core chips all its innovations it can muster to make them competitive with Intel's chips - the two feature unlocked base-clock multipliers, Precision Boost (Intel's Core i3 chips lack Turbo Boost), and XFR 2.0, which automatically overclock beyond the max boost frequencies. You also get the latest Precision Boost 2.0 algorithm that ensures each of the four cores gets varying degrees of boost clocks. Based on the 12 nm "Pinnacle Ridge" die, the two chips feature a 2+2 CCX configuration. The 2300X has 4 MB of L3 cache enabled per CCX (8 MB total), while the 2500X gives you the full 8 MB per CCX L3 cache, for a total of 16 MB. TDP of both chips are rated at 65W, and AMD could bundle the Wraith Stealth cooler with the two.

AMD Announces the B450 Chipset

AMD today announced the B450 motherboard chipset for socket AM4 processors and APUs. Positioned as the mid-range option from AMD's 400-series chipset family, the B450 will power motherboards priced anywhere between $70 to $160, and packs certain high-end features that could let you save money over choosing pricier X470-powered boards. To begin with, the B450, like the X470, has a lower TDP and power-draw, so it runs cooler, and can make do with lighter heatsinks. It comes with slightly improved reference CPU VRM and memory wiring specifications that AMD introduced with the X470. The B450, like the X470, also supports XFR 2 "Enhanced" and Precision Boost Overdrive (that lets you tinker with boost frequencies without arbitrarily setting a high clock speed).

The B450 is recommended by AMD for both Ryzen 5 series and Ryzen 7 series, provided you don't need multi-GPU, as motherboards based on B450 aren't allowed to have PEG lane bifurcation. You still get multiplier-unlocked CPU overclocking support (something the competing Intel B360 platform lacks), as well as memory overclocking. The B450 packs out of the box support for AMD StoreMI, a storage virtualization feature that stripes a portion of your memory, your fast SSD, and slower HDD, into a single volume, and juggles hot data in and out of the faster media in the background. You can have any brand of drives to use StoreMI. B350 motherboards support StoreMI through BIOS updates.

Corsair Intros 2nd Gen Hydro H75 AIO Liquid CPU Cooler

Corsair today rolled out the second generation Hydro H75 all-in-one liquid CPU cooler (model: CW-9060035-WW). A successor to the original H75 from 2013, the new 2018 Hydro H75 has four major design changes. First, you get the modern octagonal pump-block with ceramic bearings, higher coolant pressure, and white LED illumination. Second, you get more durable tubing with braided fiber outer layer. Third, you get the slightly thicker (27 mm) 120 mm aluminium radiator. You get not one, but two SP120 PWM fans that spin up to 1,900 RPM, pushing up to 64 CFM of air, at up to 31 dBA noise output, each. You install these fans in a push-pull configuration. Lastly, there's support for some of the newer CPU sockets, such as AM4 and LGA2066. Available now, the new Corsair Hydro H75 is priced at USD $89.99.

No 16-core AMD Ryzen AM4 Until After 7nm EPYC Launch (2019)

AMD in its Q2-2018 investors conference call dropped more hints at when it plans to launch its 3rd generation Ryzen processors, based on its "Zen2" architecture. CEO Lisa Su stated in the Q&A session that rollout of 7 nm Ryzen processors will only follow that of 7 nm EPYC (unlike 1st generation Ryzen preceding 1st generation EPYC). What this effectively means is that the fabled 16-core die with 8 cores per CCX won't make it to the desktop platform any time soon (at least not in the next three quarters, certainly not within 2018).

AMD CEO touched upon the development of the company's 7 nm "Rome" silicon, which will be at the heart of the company's 2nd generation EPYC processor family. 2nd generation EPYC, as you'd recall from our older article, is based on 7 nm "Zen2" architecture, and not 12 nm "Zen+." 3rd generation Ryzen is expected to be based on "Zen2." As of now, the company is said to have completed tape-out of "Rome," and is sending samples out to its industry partners for further testing and validation. The first EPYC products based on this will begin rolling out in 2019. The 7 nm process is also being used for a new "Vega" based GPU, which has taped out, and will see its first enterprise-segment product launch within 2018.

AMD Ryzen 5 2500X Makes First Appearance in an OEM Desktop

Ahead of its launch, AMD's mainstream Ryzen 5 2500X quad-core processor made its first appearance in an OEM pre-built desktop, the Acer Nitro N50-100. The 2500X is a 4-core/8-thread part clocked at 3.60 GHz with 4.00 GHz boost, and XFR 2.0 boosting it further. It's expected to be launched alongside the new entry-level Ryzen 3 2300X and the HEDT Ryzen Threadripper 2000 series processors later this year.

Priced at 943.50€, the Acer Nitro N50-100 combines the AMD Ryzen 5 2500X with a Radeon RX 580 4 GB graphics card, and 8 GB of single-channel DDR4 memory. It also features 256 GB of SSD storage, and a 1 TB secondary HDD. Connectivity includes 802.11 b/g/n WLAN, USB 3.1 gen 2, and DVD-RW ODD. Windows 10 Home comes pre-installed. You can customize this desktop with faster socket AM4 processor options, more RAM, and bigger SSDs.

EK Releases CPU+VRM Monoblock for MSI X470 Gaming Pro Carbon

EK Water Blocks, the Slovenia-based premium computer liquid cooling gear manufacturer is releasing a new AM4 socket based monoblock tailor-made for the MSI X470 Gaming Pro Carbon motherboard. The EK-FB MSI X470 Pro Carbon RGB Monoblock has an integrated 4-pin RGB LED strip and it offers unparallel aesthetics alongside with superior performance! The RGB LED in the monoblock is compatible with MSI Mystic Light Sync, thus offering a full lighting customization experience.

This is a complete all-in-one (CPU and motherboard) liquid cooling solution for the MSI X470 Gaming Pro Carbon motherboard that supports the second generation of AMD Ryzen and 7th Generation A-series/Athlon processors.

Corsair Readies Hydro H100i Pro Cooler with Zero RPM Fan Mode

Corsair is giving finishing touches to the Hydro H100i Pro, an all-in-one liquid CPU cooler designed to one-up the Hydro H100i series. Its USP is the "zero RPM fan mode," in which a fan-controller integrated with the pump-block turns off the fans when the coolant is below a temperature threshold. Corsair believes this could help most gamers overcome their biggest gripe with liquid cooling - that the fans keep running.

The pump-block of the H100i Pro looks similar to the H100i, with its silver-finish octagonal shape, and RGB LED ornament that can be controlled by Corsair iCue software. A pair of ML120 fans are included with this cooler, to ventilate the 240 mm x 120 mm radiator. Each of these fans spin between 400 to 2,400 RPM, pushing up to 75 CFM of air, with a noise output up to 37 dBA. The cooler will support most socket types, including LGA2066, LGA115x, and AM4.

GIGABYTE Readies a Pair of Aorus Branded AMD B450 Motherboards

GIGABYTE is ready with two Aorus branded motherboards based on the upcoming AMD B450 mid-range socket AM4 chipset. These include the B450 Aorus Pro in the ATX form-factor, and the micro-ATX B450 Aorus M. The B450 Aorus Pro packs many of the features you'd expect from a more expensive board based on the pricier X470 chipset. The board draws power from a combination of 24-pin ATX and 8-pin EPS connectors, conditioning it for the AM4 SoC using a 11-phase VRM with high-current chokes. The AM4 SoC is wired to four DDR4 DIMM slots, and the board's sole reinforced PCI-Express 3.0 x16 slot. The second x16 slot is physically gen 3.0 x4 and shares its lanes with the top M.2-22110 slot; which is wired directly to the AM4 SoC. With an M.2 SSD installed, auto-switching gates the second x16 AIC slot. The third x16 slot is gen 2.0 x4, and wired to the chipset. The second M.2-2280 slot is gen 2.0 x4, too. A single PCIe x1 slot makes for the rest of the expansion.

Both M.2 slots on the B450 Aorus Pro feature heatsinks. Six SATA 6 Gbps ports, from which two come from the AM4 SoC, make for the rest of the storage connectivity. As part of the "gamer-grade" varnishing, this board gets rather high-end onboard audio, including a Realtek ALC1220 (120 dBA SNR) codec with EMI shielding, audio-grade WIMA and Muse capacitors, and ground layer isolation. USB connectivity includes two USB 3.1 type 2 ports (one each of type-A and type-C); and six USB 3.1 gen 1 (four on the rear panel, two by headers). Display outputs include DVI and HDMI. The sole networking connectivity is a 1 GbE interface. Its controller is unknown. You get RGB LED illumination and headers, and an integrated rear I/O shield.

Arctic Announces Market Availability of New Alpine Passive Series Heatsinks

Dark, reliable, affordable - these are ARCTIC's new CPU coolers, the Alpine AM4 Passive and the Alpine 12 Passive. Both passive coolers are available now and provide silent cooling for the AMD AM4 platform as well as for PC's with an Intel 115X base. The active coolers in other Alpine series will likewise be replaced with newly developed models during the course of the year.

The Alpine AM4 Passive and the Alpine 12 Passive operate fanless and completely silent, yet they are powerful enough to cool all compatible CPUs up to 47 watts. The black anodization of the aluminum heat sink is not just an optical improvement: the heat dissipation of the heat sink is also increased through anodic oxidation.

DeepCool Intros the Fryzen CPU Air Cooler for AMD Threadripper

DeepCool probably intended for its name to read like "frozen," but ended up with the name "Fryzen," which is what I'd call a fried (dead) Ryzen. The GamerStorm Fryzen is a large tower-type CPU air cooler designed for AMD socket TR4. Its 68 mm x 46 mm base offers 100% coverage of the AMD Ryzen Threadripper IHS (integrated heatspreader), although it also supports AM4. It takes advantage of this large nickel-plated copper base to pass six 6 mm heat-pipes through the longer side, such that heat pipes line the width of the aluminium fin-stack, rather than the edges. The fin-stack is capped off by a stylish top-plate with an RGB LED diffuser.

The included 120 mm fan spins between 500 to 1,800 RPM, pushing up to 64 CFM of air, with noise output ranging between 17.8-41.5 dBA. The fan features fluid-dynamic bearing, and an X-shaped RGB LED diffuser along its uniquely shaped frame. With the fan installed the Fryzen measures 124 mm x 81.5 mm x 164.6 mm (WxDxH), with little or no intrusion into the memory slots on either side of the CPU socket. It weighs 1.18 kg. Its various RGB LED diffusers take in standardized addressable RGB LED header input, supporting most software control standards. The company didn't reveal pricing.

Intel Shelves Z390 Express As We Knew It, Could Re-brand Z370 as Z390

Intel is rumored to have shelved the iteration of its upcoming Z390 Express chipset as earlier publicized, the one which had certain new hardware features. It could now re-brand the existing Z370 Express as Z390 Express and probably bolster its reference design with heftier CPU VRM specifications, to cope better with its upcoming 8-core LGA1151 processors. The Z370 Express is similar in feature-set to the brink of being identical to its predecessor, the Z270 Express. This move could impact certain new hardware features that were on the anvil, such as significantly more USB 3.1 gen 2/gen1 ports directly from the PCH, integrated WiFi MAC, and Intel SmartSound technology, which borrowed certain concepts from edge-computing to implement native speech-to-text conversion directly on the chipset, for improved voice control latency and reduced CPU overhead.

The reasons behind this move could be a combination of last-minute cost-benefit analyses by Intel's bean-counters, and having to mass-produce Z390 Express on the busier-than-expected 14 nm silicon fabrication node, as opposed to current 300-series chipsets being built on the 22 nm node that's nearing the end of its life-cycle. Intel probably needed the switch to 14 nm for the significant increases in transistor-counts arising from the additional USB controllers, the WiFi MAC, and the SmartSound logic. Intel probably doesn't have the vacant 14 nm node capacity needed to mass-produce the Z390 yet, as its transition to future processes such as 10 nm and 7 nm are still saddled with setbacks and delays; and redesigning the Z390 (as we knew it) on 22 nm may have emerged unfeasible (i.e. the chip may have ended up too big and/or too hot). The Z390 Express chipset block-diagram, which we published in our older article has been quietly removed from Intel's website. It's also rumored that this move could force AMD to rethink its plans to launch its Z490 socket AM4 chipset.

AMD Motherboard Vendors Are Removing Support for Older CPU Models

Current AMD AM4 motherboards basically support four platforms at the moment: the new Ryzen 2000 processors, Ryzen 2000 G APUs with integrated graphics, 1st generation Ryzen and Bristol Ridge. Bristol Ridge was AMD's last processor generation before Ryzen was released. Bristol Ridge introduced Socket AM4, which according to AMD has a lifespan beyond 2020. According to Anandtech, several motherboard manufacturers are now reporting that they might drop support for Bristol Ridge in their future motherboard releases. The underlying reason is that in addition to the setup interface, and UEFI with its driver and network stack, the BIOS has to support all processors by including microcode for them.

Supporting so many CPU models bloats the size of the BIOS beyond 128 megabits (16 MB), which would exceed the capacity of the BIOS flash chips used by most vendors and force them to use higher capacity models, ie 256 megabits. As always in this industry, the issue here comes down to pricing.
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