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NVIDIA Reportedly Readies RTX 2060 12 GB SKUs for Early 2022 Launch

Videocardz, citing their own sources in the industry, claims that NVIDIA is readying a resurrection of sorts for the popular RTX 2060 graphics card. One of the hallmarks of the raytracing era, the Turing-based RTX 2060 routinely stands as the second most popular graphics card on Steam's hardware survey. Considering the still-ongoing semiconductor shortages and overreaching demand stretching logistics and supply lines thin, NVIDIA would thus be looking at a slight specs bump (double the GDDR6 memory to 12 GB) as a marketing point for the revised RTX 2060. This would also add to the company's ability to deliver mainstream-performance graphics cards in a high enough volume that enables the company to keep reaping benefits from the current Ampere line-up's higher ASP (Average Selling Price) across the board.

Videocardz' sources claim the revised RTX 2060 will be making use of the PG116 board, recycling it from the original GTX 1660 Ti design it was born unto. Apparently, NVIDIA has already warned board partners that the final design and specifications might be ready at years' end, with a potential re-release for January 2021. While the increase to a 12 GB memory footprint on an RTX 2060 graphics card is debatable, NVIDIA has to have some marketing flair to add to such a release. Remember that the RTX 2060 was already given a second lease of life earlier this year as a stopgap solution towards getting more gaming-capable graphics cards on the market; NVIDIA had allegedly moved its RTX 2060 manufacturing allocation back to Ampere, but now it seems that we'll witness a doubling-down on the RTX 2060. Now we just have to wait for the secondary market pricing to come down from its current $500 average... For a $349 MSRP, 2019 graphics card.

Data is Beautiful: 10 Years of AMD and NVIDIA GPU Innovation Visualized

Using our graphics card database, which is managed by our very own T4CFantasy, reddit user u/Vito_ponfe_Andariel created some basic charts mapping out the data points from our expansive, industry-leading GPU database. In these charts, the user compares technological innovation for both AMD and NVIDIA's GPUs in the last ten years, plotting out the performance evolution of the "best available GPU" per year in terms of performance, performance per dollar (using the database's launch price metric), energy consumption, performance per transistor, and a whole lot of other data correlation sets.

It's interesting to note technological changes in these charts and how they relate to the overall values. For example, if you look at the performance per transistor graph, you'll notice that performance per transistor has actually declined roughly 20% with the transition from NVIDIA's Pascal (GTX 1080 Ti) to the Turing (RTX 20-series) architecture. At the same time, AMD's performance per transistor exploded around 40% from Vega 64 to the RX 5700 XT graphics card. This happens, in part, due to the introduction of raytracing-specific hardware on NVIDIA's Turing, which takes up transistor counts without aiding in general shading performance - while AMD benefited from a new architecture in RDNA as well as the process transition from 14 nm to 7 nm. We see this declining performance behavior again with AMD's introduction of the RX 6800 XT from AMD, which loses some 40% in this performance per transistor metric - likely due to the introduction of RT cores and other architectural changes. There are of course other variables to the equation, but it is nonetheless interesting to note. Look after the break for the rest of the charts.

Grab the Stunning "Attic" NVIDIA RTX + DLSS Unreal Engine Interactive Demo, Works on even AMD

We are hosting the NVIDIA "Attic" RTX + DLSS interactive tech-demo in our Downloads section. Developed on Unreal Engine 4, the demo puts you in the bunny-slippers of a little girl playing around in her attic. This is no normal attic, it's her kingdom, complete with stuff to build a pillow fort, an old CRT TV playing retro NVIDIA commercials, a full-length mirror, really cool old stuff, and decorations. You can explore the place in a first-person perspective.

The interactive demo is brought to life with on-the-fly controls for RTX real-time raytracing and its various features, DLSS performance enhancement, a frame-rate counter, and controls for time-of-day, which alters lighting in the room. The demo shows off raytraced reflections, translucency, global-illumination, direct-illumination, and DLSS. You also get cool gadgets such as the "light cannon" or a reflective orb, that let you play around with dynamic lighting some more. To use this demo, you'll need a machine with an RTX 20-series "Turing" or RTX 30-series "Ampere" graphics card, and Windows 10. The demo also works on Radeon RX 6000 series GPUs. Grab it from the link below.

DOWNLOAD: NVIDIA Unreal Engine 4 RTX & DLSS Demo

First NVIDIA Palit CMP 30HX Mining GPU Available at a Tentative $723

NVIDIA's recently-announced CMP (Cryptocurrency Mining Processor) products seem to already be hitting the market - at least in some parts of the world. Microless, a retailer in Dubai, listed the cryptocurrency-geared graphics card for $723 - $723 which are equivalent to some 26 MH/s, as per NVIDIA, before any optimizatons have been enacted on the clock/voltage/BIOS level, as more serious miners will undoubtedly do.

The CMP 30HX is a re-released TU116 chip (Turing, sans RT hardware), which powered the likes of the GeForce GTX 1660 Super in NVIDIA's previous generation of graphics cards. The card features a a 1,530 MHz base clock; a 1,785 MHz boost clock; alongside 6 GB of GDDR6 memory that clocks in at 14 Gbps (which actually could soon stop being enough to hold the entire workload completely in memory). Leveraging a 192-bit memory interface, the graphics card supplies a memory bandwidth of up to 336 GB/s. It's also a "headless" GPU, meaning that it has no display outputs that would only add to cost in such a specifically-geared product. It's unclear how representative the pricing from Microless actually is of NVIDIA's MSRP for the 30HX products, but considering current graphics cards' pricing worldwide, this pricing seems to be in line with GeForce offerings capable of achieving the same hash rates, so its ability to concentrate demand from miners compared to other NVIDIA mainstream, GeForce offerings depends solely on the prices that are both set by NVIDIA and practiced by retailers.

NVIDIA's New 30HX & 40HX Crypto Mining Cards Are Based on Turing Architecture

We have recently discovered that NVIDIA's newly announced 30HX and 40HX Crypto Mining Processors are based on the last-generation Turing architecture. This news will come as a pleasant surprise to gamers as the release shouldn't affect the availability of Ampere RTX 30 Series GPUs. The decision to stick with Turing for these new devices is reportedly due to the more favorable power-management of the architecture which is vital for profitable cryptocurrency mining operations. The NVIDIA CMP 40HX will feature a custom TU106 processor while the 30HX will include a custom TU116. This information was discovered in the latest GeForce 461.72 WHQL drivers which added support for the two devices.

NVIDIA to Re-introduce GeForce RTX 2060 and RTX 2060 SUPER GPUs

We are just a few weeks away from the launch of NVIDIA's latest GeForce RTX 3060 graphics cards based on the new Ampere architecture, and there is already some news regarding the lineup position and its possible distortion. According to multiple sources over at Overclocking.com, NVIDIA is set to re-introduce its previous generation GeForce RTX 2060 and RTX 2060 SUPER graphics cards to the market. Once again. The source claims that NVIDIA is already pushing the stock over to its board partners and system integrators to use the last-generation product. So far, it is not clear why the company is doing this and we can only speculate on it.

The source also claims that the pricing structure of the old cards will be 300 EUR for RTX 2060 and 400 EUR for RTX 2060 SUPER in Europe. The latter pricing models directly competes with the supposed 399 EUR price tag of the upcoming GeForce RTX 3060 Ti model, which is based on the newer Ampere uArch instead of the last-gen Turing cards. The possibility for such a move is a possible scarce of GA106/GA104 silicon needed for the new cards, and the company could be aiming to try and satisfy the market with left-over stock from the previous generation cards.

Intel Launches Phantom Canyon NUCs: Tiger Lake and NVIDIA GPU Join Forces

Intel has today quietly launched its newest generation of Next Unit of Computing (NUC) devices with some nice upgrades over the prior generation. Codenamed the "Phantom Canyon", the latest NUC generation brings a major improvement for the "enthusiast" crowd, meant mostly at gamers who would like to use a small form-factor machine and have decent framerates. This is where the Enthusiast NUC 11 comes in. With its 28 Watt Intel Core i7-1165G7 Tiger Lake CPU, which features four cores and eight threads clocked at the maximum of 4.70 GHz, this Enthusiast NUC 11 mini-PC is rocking the latest technologies inside it.

To pair with the CPU, Intel has decided to put a discrete GPU, besides the Integrated Xe model, to power the frames needed. The dGPU in question is NVIDIA's GeForce RTX 2060 model with 6 GB of GDDR6 VRAM, based on the last generation "Turing" architecture. For I/O, Intel has equipped these machines with quite a lot of ports. There is Intel AX201 Wi-Fi 6 plus Bluetooth 5 module, a quad-mic array with beam-forming, far-field capabilities, and support for Alexa. There is a 2.5 Gb Ethernet port, along with two Thunderbolt 4.0 ports for internet connectivity and other purposes (TB ports support fast charging). When it comes to display output, the Enthusiast NUC 11 has HDMI 2.0b and a mini DisplayPort 1.4 port. You can run four monitors in total when using the Thunderbolt ports. On the front side, there is also an SD card reader, and the PC has six USB 3.1 Gen2 ports in total. You can find out more about the Enthusiast NUC 11 mini-PCs here.

NVIDIA Could Give a SUPER Overhaul to its GeForce RTX 3070 and RTX 3080 Graphics Cards

According to kopite7kimi, a famous leaker of information about NVIDIA graphics cards, we have some pieces of data about NVIDIA's plans to bring back its SUPER series of graphics cards. The SUPER graphics cards have first appeared in the GeForce RTX 2000 series "Turing" GPUs with GeForce RTX 2080 SUPER and RTX 2070 SUPER designs, after which RTX 2060 followed. Thanks to the source, we have information that NVIDIA plans to give its newest "Ampere" 3000 series of GeForce RTX GPUs a SUPER overhaul. Specifically, the company allegedly plans to introduce GeForce RTX 3070 SUPER and RTX 3080 SUPER SKUs to its offerings.

While there is no concrete information about the possible specifications of these cards, we can speculate that just like the previous SUPER upgrade, new cards would receive an upgrade in CUDA core count, and possibly a memory improvement. The last time a SUPER upgrade happened, NVIDIA just added more cores to the GPU and overclocked the GDDR6 memory and thus increased the memory bandwidth. We have to wait and see how the company plans to position these alleged cards and if we get them at all, so take this information with a grain of salt.
NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080 SUPER Mock-Up
This is only a mock-up image and is not representing a real product.

Akasa Rolls Out Turing QLX Fanless Case for Intel NUC 9 Pro

Akasa today rolled out the Turing QLX, a fanless case for the Intel NUC 9 Pro "Quartz Canyon" desktop platform that consists of an Intel NUC 9 Pro Compute Element, and a PCIe backplane. This form-factor is essentially a modern re-imagining of the SBC+backplane desktops from the i486 era. The Turing QLX case is made almost entirely of anodized aluminium, and its body doubles up as a heatsink for the 9th Gen Core or Xeon SoC. You're supposed to replace the cooling assembly of your NUC 9 Pro Compute Element with the cold-plate + heat-pipe assembly of the case. NUC 9 Pro series SBCs compatible with the Turing QLX include the BXNUC9i9QNB, BXNUC9i7QNB, BXNUC9i5QNB, BKNUC9VXQNB, and the BKNUC9V7QNB. The case doesn't include a power supply, you're supposed to use a compatible power brick with the SBC+backplane combo. The Turing QLX measures 212 mm x 150 mm x 220 mm (DxWxH). The company didn't reveal pricing.

NVIDIA's Next-Gen Big GPU AD102 Features 18,432 Shaders

The rumor mill has begun grinding with details about NVIDIA's next-gen graphics processors based on the "Lovelace" architecture, with Kopite7kimi (a reliable source with NVIDIA leaks) predicting a 71% increase in shader units for the "AD102" GPU that succeeds the "GA102," with 12 GPCs holding 6 TPCs (12 SMs), each. 3DCenter.org extrapolates on this to predict a CUDA core count of 18.432 spread across 144 streaming multiprocessors, which at a theoretical 1.80 GHz core clock could put out an FP32 compute throughput of around 66 TFLOP/s.

The timing of this leak is interesting, as it's only 3 months into the market cycle of "Ampere." NVIDIA appears unsettled with AMD RDNA2 being competitive with "Ampere" at the enthusiast segment, and is probably bringing in its successor, "Lovelace" (after Ada Lovelace), out sooner than expected. Its previous generation "Turing" architecture saw market presence for close to two years. "Lovelace" could leverage the 5 nm silicon fabrication process and its significantly higher transistor density, to step up performance.

NVIDIA Updates Cyberpunk 2077, Minecraft RTX, and 4 More Games with DLSS

NVIDIA's Deep Learning Super Sampling (DLSS) technology uses advanced methods to offload sampling in games to the Tensor Cores, dedicated AI processors that are present on all of the GeForce RTX cards, including the prior Turing generation and now Ampere. NVIDIA promises that the inclusion of DLSS is promising to deliver up to a 40% performance boost, or even more. Today, the company has announced that DLSS is getting support in Cyberpunk 2077, Minecraft RTX, Mount & Blade II: Bannerlord, CRSED: F.O.A.D., Scavengers, and Moonlight Blade. The inclusion of these titles is now making NVIDIA's DLSS technology present in a total of 32 titles, which is no small feat for new technology.
Below, you can see the company provided charts about the performance of DLSS inclusion in the new titles, except the Cyberpunk 2077.
Update: The Cyberpunk 2077 performance numbers were leaked (thanks to kayjay010101 on TechPowerUp Forums), and you can check them out as well.

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3060 Ti Confirmed, Beats RTX 2080 SUPER

It looks like NVIDIA will launch its 4th GeForce RTX 30-series product ahead of Holiday 2020, the GeForce RTX 3060 Ti, with VideoCardz unearthing a leaked NVIDIA performance guidance slide, as well as pictures of custom-design RTX 3060 Ti cards surfacing on social media. The RTX 3060 Ti is reportedly based on the same 8 nm "GA104" silicon as the RTX 3070, but cut down further. It features 38 out of 48 streaming multiprocessors physically present on the "GA104," amounting to 4,864 "Ampere" CUDA cores, 152 tensor cores, and 38 "Ampere" RT cores. The memory configuration is unchanged from the RTX 3070, which means you get 8 GB of 14 Gbps GDDR6 memory across a 256-bit wide memory interface, with 448 GB/s of memory bandwidth.

According to a leaked NVIDIA performance guidance slide for the RTX 3060 Ti, the company claims the card to consistently beat the GeForce RTX 2080 SUPER, a $700 high-end SKU from the previous "Turing" generation. The same slide also shows a roughly 40% performance gain over the previous generation RTX 2060 SUPER, which is probably the logical predecessor for this card. In related news, PC Master Race (OfficialPCMR) on its Facebook page posted pictures of boxes of an ASUS TUF Gaming GeForce RTX 3060 Ti OC graphics cards, which confirms the existence of this SKU. The picture of the card on the box reveals a design similar to other TUF Gaming RTX 30-series cards launched by ASUS so far. As for price, VideoCardz predicts a $399 MSRP for the SKU, which should nearly double the price-performance for this card over the RTX 2080 SUPER at NVIDIA's performance numbers.

NVIDIA RTX IO Detailed: GPU-assisted Storage Stack Here to Stay Until CPU Core-counts Rise

NVIDIA at its GeForce "Ampere" launch event announced the RTX IO technology. Storage is the weakest link in a modern computer, from a performance standpoint, and SSDs have had a transformational impact. With modern SSDs leveraging PCIe, consumer storage speeds are now bound to grow with each new PCIe generation doubling per-lane IO bandwidth. PCI-Express Gen 4 enables 64 Gbps bandwidth per direction on M.2 NVMe SSDs, AMD has already implemented it across its Ryzen desktop platform, Intel has it on its latest mobile platforms, and is expected to bring it to its desktop platform with "Rocket Lake." While more storage bandwidth is always welcome, the storage processing stack (the task of processing ones and zeroes to the physical layer), is still handled by the CPU. With rise in storage bandwidth, the IO load on the CPU rises proportionally, to a point where it can begin to impact performance. Microsoft sought to address this emerging challenge with the DirectStorage API, but NVIDIA wants to build on this.

According to tests by NVIDIA, reading uncompressed data from an SSD at 7 GB/s (typical max sequential read speeds of client-segment PCIe Gen 4 M.2 NVMe SSDs), requires the full utilization of two CPU cores. The OS typically spreads this workload across all available CPU cores/threads on a modern multi-core CPU. Things change dramatically when compressed data (such as game resources) are being read, in a gaming scenario, with a high number of IO requests. Modern AAA games have hundreds of thousands of individual resources crammed into compressed resource-pack files.

Microsoft Rolls Out DirectX 12 Feature-level 12_2: Turing and RDNA2 Support it

Microsoft on Thursday rolled out the DirectX 12 feature-level 12_2 specification. This adds a set of new API-level features to DirectX 12 feature-level 12_1. It's important to understand that 12_2 is not DirectX 12 Ultimate, even though Microsoft explains in its developer blog that the four key features that make up DirectX 12 Ultimate logo requirements were important enough to be bundled into a new feature-level. At the same time, Ultimate isn't feature-level 12_1, either. The DirectX 12 Ultimate logo requirement consists of DirectX Raytracing, Mesh Shaders, Sampler Feedback, and Variable Rate Shading. These four, combined with an assortment of new features make up feature-level 12_2.

Among the updates introduced with feature-level 12_2 are DXR 1.1, Shader Model 6.5, Variable Rate Shading tier-2, Resource Binding tier-3, Tiled Resources tier-3, Conservative Rasterization tier-3, Root Signature tier-1.1, WriteBufferImmediateSupportFlags, GPU Virtual Address Bits resource expansion, among several other Direct3D raster rendering features. Feature-level 12_2 requires a WDDM 2.0 driver, and a compatible GPU. Currently, NVIDIA's "Turing" based GeForce RTX 20-series are the only GPUs capable of feature-level 12_2. Microsoft announced that AMD's upcoming RDNA2 architecture supports 12_2, too. NVIDIA's upcoming "Ampere" (RTX 20-series successors) may support it, too.

KFA2 Intros GeForce GTX 1650 GDDR6 EX PLUS Graphics Card

GALAX's European brand KFA2 launched the GeForce GTX 1650 GDDR6 EX PLUS graphics card. The card looks identical to the one pictured below, but with the 6-pin PCIe power input removed, relying entirely on the PCIe slot for power. Based on the 12 nm "TU116" silicon, the GPU features 896 "Turing" CUDA cores, and talks to 4 GB of GDDR6 memory across a 128-bit wide memory interface. With a memory data rate of 12 Gbps, the chip has 192 GB/s of memory bandwidth on tap. The GPU max boost frequency is set at 1605 MHz, with a software-based 1635 MHz "one click OC" mode. The cooling solution consists of an aluminium mono-block heatsink that's ventilated by a pair of 80 mm fans. Display outputs include one each of DisplayPort 1.4, HDMI 2.0b, and dual-link DVI-D. Available now in the EU, the KFA2 GeForce GTX 1650 GDDR6 EX PLUS is priced at 129€ (including taxes).

Video Memory Sizes Set to Swell as NVIDIA Readies 20GB and 24GB GeForce Amperes

NVIDIA's GeForce RTX 20-series "Turing" graphics card series did not increase video memory sizes in comparison to GeForce GTX 10-series "Pascal," although the memory itself is faster on account of GDDR6. This could change with the GeForce RTX 30-series "Ampere," as the company looks to increase memory sizes across the board in a bid to shore up ray-tracing performance. WCCFTech has learned that in addition to a variety of strange new memory bus widths, such as 320-bit, NVIDIA could introduce certain higher variants of its RTX 30-series cards with video memory sizes as high as 20 GB and 24 GB.

Memory sizes of 20 GB or 24 GB aren't new for NVIDIA's professional-segment Quadro products, but it's certainly new for GeForce, with only the company's TITAN-series products breaking the 20 GB-mark at prices due north of $2,000. Much of NVIDIA's high-end appears to be resting on segmentation of the PG132 common board design, coupled with the GA102 silicon, from which the company could carve out several SKUs spaced far apart in the company's product stack. NVIDIA's next-generation GeForce "Ampere" family is expected to debut in September 2020, with product launches in the higher-end running through late-Q3 and Q4 of 2020.

EVGA Introduces GeForce GTX 1650 KO with GDDR6

Introducing the EVGA GeForce GTX 1650 KO with GDDR6. The EVGA GeForce GTX 1650 KO gives you the best gaming performance at a value you cannot resist. Now it's updated with GDDR6 memory, giving you that extra edge to up your game to the next level.

Featuring concurrent execution of floating point and integer operations, adaptive shading technology, and a new unified memory architecture with twice the cache of its predecessor, Turing shaders enable awesome performance increases on today's games. Get 1.4X power efficiency over previous generation for a faster, cooler and quieter gaming experience that take advantage of Turing's advanced graphics features.

NVIDIA "Ampere" Designed for both HPC and GeForce/Quadro

NVIDIA CEO Jensen Huang in a pre-GTC press briefing stressed that the upcoming "Ampere" graphics architecture will spread across both the company's compute-accelerator and commercial graphics product lines. The architecture makes its debut later today with the Tesla A100 HPC processor for breakthrough AI acceleration. It's unlikely that any GeForce products will be formally announced this month, with rumors pointing to a GeForce "Ampere" product launch at a gaming-focused event in September, close to "Cyberpunk 2077" launch.

It was earlier believed that NVIDIA had forked its breadwinning IP into two lines, one focused on headless scalar compute, and the other on graphics products through the company's GeForce and Quadro product lines. To that effect, its "Volta" architecture focused on scalar-compute (with the exception of the forgotten TITAN V); and the "Turing" architecture focused solely on GeForce and Quadro. It was then believed that "Ampere" will focus on compute, and the so-called "Hopper" would be this generation's graphics-focused architecture. We now know that won't be the case. We've compiled a selection of GeForce Ampere rumors in this article.

TSMC Secures Orders from NVIDIA for 7nm and 5nm Chips

TSMC has reportedly secured orders from NVIDIA for chips based on its 7 nm and 5 nm silicon fabrication nodes, sources tell DigiTimes. If true, it could confirm rumors of NVIDIA splitting its next-generation GPU manufacturing between TSMC and Samsung. The Korean semiconductor giant is commencing 5 nm EUV mass production within Q2-2020, and NVIDIA is expected to be one of its customers. NVIDIA is expected to shed light on its next-gen graphics architecture at the GTC 2020 online event held later this month. With its "Turing" architecture approaching six quarters of market presence, it's likely that the decks are being cleared for a new architecture not just in HPC/AI compute product segment, but also GeForce and Quadro consumer graphics cards. Splitting manufacturing between TSMC and Samsung would help NVIDIA disperse any yield issue arriving from either foundry's EUV node, and give it greater bargaining power with both.

GALAX Extends Pink Edition Treatment to Even RTX 2080 Super

In a quick follow-up to our story from yesterday about the GALAX GeForce RTX 2070 Super EX Pink Edition graphics card, we are learning that the company is ready with a GeForce RTX 2080 Super graphics card based on the same board design. Bearing the model number "28ISL6MD71PE," the card is a costmetic variant of the company's RTX 2080 Super EX graphics card, featuring a bubblegum pink paintjob on the cooler shroud and back-plate. The PCB, although of the same design as the EX (1-click OC), is now fully white, like the HOF series. The RGB LED fans glow hot-pink out of the box. The Pink Edition card ships with factory-overclocked speeds of 1845 MHz GPU Boost (vs. 1815 MHz reference), and its software-based 1-click OC feature enables 1860 MHz boost frequencies. The memory is untouched, at 15.5 Gbps (GDDR6-effective).

The GeForce RTX 2080 Super maxes out the 12 nm "TU104" silicon, featuring 3,072 "Turing" CUDA cores, 192 TMUs, 64 ROPs, and a 256-bit wide GDDR6 memory interface holding 8 GB of memory. Much like its RTX 2070 Super sibling, this card pulls power from a combination of 8-pin and 6-pin PCIe power connectors; while its display outputs include three DisplayPorts and one HDMI. Expect an identical product to be launched under the KFA2 brand in certain markets. The company didn't reveal pricing.

NVIDIA Makes GDDR6 an Official GeForce GTX 1650 Memory Option

NVIDIA updated the product page of its GeForce GTX 1650 graphics card to make GDDR6 an official memory option besides the GDDR5 that the SKU launched with, back in Q2-2019. NVIDIA now has two product specs for the SKU, the GTX 1650 (G5), and GTX 1650 (G6). Both feature 896 "Turing" CUDA cores, 56 TMUs, and 32 ROPs; but differ entirely in memory configuration and clock speeds.

The GTX 1650 (G6) features 4 GB of GDDR6 memory clocked at 12 Gbps, across a 128-bit wide memory bus, compared to the original GTX 1650, which uses 4 GB of 8 Gbps GDDR5 across the same bus width. This results in a 50% memory bandwidth gain for the new SKU: 192 GB/s vs. 128 GB/s. On the other hand, the GPU clock speeds are lower than those of the original GTX 1650. The new G6 variant ticks at 1410 MHz base and 1590 MHz GPU Boost, compared to 1485/1665 MHz of the original GTX 1650. This was probably done to ensure that the new SKU fits within the 75 W typical board power envelope of the original, enabling card designs that lack additional power connectors. As for pricing, Newegg recently had an MSI GeForce GTX 1650 GDDR6 Gaming X listed for $159.

Next-Generation Laptop Hardware from Intel and NVIDIA Coming April 2nd

Intel and NVIDIA are preparing to refresh their hardware offering meant for laptop devices, and they are planning to do it on April 2nd. According to the Chinese website ITHome, Intel is going to launch its 10th generation Comet Lake-H CPUs for mobile devices, on April 2nd. The new models are going to bring improved frequency and core count, with top-end models reaching up to 8 cores with 16 threads. NVIDIA, on the other hand, will also update its mobile offerings with the arrival of Turing SUPER mobile cards. So far, we only had a choice of regular Turing series, however, there is soon going to be a SUPER variant of the existing cards.

Being that these cards are also expected to arrive on April 2nd, laptop manufacturers will integrate new products and showcase their solutions on that date. The availability of these devices, based on new Intel Comet Lake-H CPUs and NVIDIA Turing SUPER GPUs, is expected to follow soon after, precisely on April 15th. Additionally, it is notable that laptop manufacturer Mechrevo will hold an online press conference where they will showcase their "Z3" gaming laptop based on new technologies.
Mechrevo NVIDIA Turing SUPER Laptops

Microsoft DirectX 12 Ultimate: Why it Helps Gamers Pick Future Proof Graphics Cards

Microsoft Thursday released the DirectX 12 Ultimate logo. This is not a new API with any new features, but rather a differentiator for graphics cards and game consoles that support four key modern features of DirectX 12. This helps consumers recognize the newer and upcoming GPUs, and tell them apart from some older DirectX 12 capable GPUs that were released in the mid-2010s. For a GPU to be eligible for the DirectX 12 Ultimate logo, it must feature hardware acceleration for ray-tracing with the DXR API; must support Mesh Shaders, Variable Rate Shading (VRS), and Sampler Feedback (all of the four). The upcoming Xbox Series X console features this logo by default. Microsoft made it absolutely clear that the DirectX 12 Ultimate logo isn't meant as a compatibility barrier, and that these games will work on older hardware, too.

As it stands, the "Navi"-based Radeon RX 5000 series are "obsolete", just like some Turing cards from the GeForce GTX 16-series. At this time, the only shipping product which features the logo is NVIDIA's GeForce RTX 20-series and the TITAN RTX, as they support all the above features.

NVIDIA GeForce RTX GPUs to Support the DirectX 12 Ultimate API

NVIDIA graphics cards, starting from the current generation GeForce RTX "Turing" lineup, will support the upcoming DirectX 12 Ultimate API. Thanks to a slide obtained by our friends over at VideoCardz, we have some information about the upcoming iteration of the DirectX 12 API made by Microsoft. In the new API revision, called "DirectX 12 Ultimate", it looks like there are some enhancements made to the standard DirectX 12 API. From the leaked slide we can see the improvements coming in the form of a few additions.

The GeForce RTX lineup will support the updated version of API with features such as ray tracing, variable-rate shading, mesh shader, and sampler feedback. While we do not know why Microsoft decided to call this the "Ultimate" version, it is possibly used to convey clearer information about which features are supported by the hardware. In the leaked slide there is a mention of consoles as well, so it is coming to that platform as well.

NVIDIA's Next-Generation Ampere GPUs to be 50% Faster than Turing at Half the Power

As we approach the release of NVIDIA's Ampere GPUs, which are rumored to launch in the second half of this year, more rumors and information about the upcoming graphics cards are appearing. Today, according to the latest report made by Taipei Times, NVIDIA's next-generation of graphics cards based on "Ampere" architecture is rumored to have as much as 50% performance uplift compared to the previous generations of Turing GPUs, while using having half the power consumption.

Built using Samsung's 7 nm manufacturing node, Ampere is poised to be the new king among all future GPUs. The rumored 50% performance increase is not impossible, due to features and improvements that the new 7 nm manufacturing node brings. If utilizing the density alone, NVIDIA can extract at least 50% extra performance that is due to the use of a smaller node. However, performance should increase even further because Ampere will bring new architecture as well. Combining a new manufacturing node and new microarchitecture, Ampere will reduce power consumption in half, making for a very efficient GPU solution. We still don't know if the performance will increase mostly for ray tracing applications, or will NVIDIA put the focus on general graphics performance.
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