News Posts matching "Turing"

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First Renders of GIGABYTE RTX 2060 Graphics Card Surface

According to Videocardz, they've worked through their industry sources in confirming the headline we're bringing to you - there really is an RTX 2060 chip incoming from NVIDIA. Pictured is GIGABYTE's take on a factory-overclocked graphics card based on that silicon, with a dual-fan cooling system, an 8-pin power connector (which Videocardz says should stay at a 6-pin count on the reference design). According to the report, the new RTX 2060 will see the core count reduced to 30 CUs - which amounts to some 1920 CUDA cores, down from the 36 CUs and 2304 CUDA cores in the RTX 2070.

NVIDIA's new Turing architecture's launch and performance reviews of RTX-enabled games showed considerable difficulties in enabling the raytracing tech in slower hardware than NVIDIA's RTX 2070 - and the RTX 2060 will likely see the new stars of the show, the RT cores, cut down in number form the RTX 2070. I imagine there could be a scenario where NVIDIA kept the same number of raytracing resources as in the RTX 2070, keeping that as the baseline for this generation's raytracing performance, but that's daydreaming. New patches (such as the one for Battlefield V), however, have increased performance of raytracing on existing graphics cards, so maybe the RTX 2060 will be able to offer good experiences on the lowest RT settings?

EVGA Teases GeForce RTX 2080 Ti KIngpIn Edition

EVGA has been launching a number of products in partnership with renowned overclocker KIngpIn (Vince Lucido). These are typically made for extreme overclocking scenarios, and represent the very top of EVGA's offerings in terms of materials, build quality, and scarcity of built cards. For now, there's just a simple tease, posted via Vince Lucido's Instagram account, but this serves to surprise virtually nobody: NVIDIA's Turing will also receive the KIngpIn treatment.

Past examples of KIngpIn-branded graphics cards supported features such as improved power delivery systems (increased number of phases and power connectors), as well as some of the most versatile designs ever, with both triple-slot cooling solutions and single-slot adapters. As always, expect the GPUs inside the KIngpIn RTX 2080 Ti to be cherry-picked versions out of EVGA's crops.

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 and 2080 Mobile Could Make an Appearance at CES 2019

With NVIDIA's GeForce RTX 20-series having already released for desktops, it was only a matter of time until laptops got the RTX treatment as well. Current rumors are suggesting that Nvidia will officially launch their GeForce RTX 20-series mobility GPUs on January 6th at CES with the RTX 2070 and RTX 2070 Max-Q taking center stage. An embargo date of January 26th has also been set, with NVIDIA delaying their final release drivers until then. Meaning final performance results for the new mobile GPUs won't be available until after the embargo date, which should coincide with the general availability of RTX 20-series equipped laptops.

Along with the RTX 2070 and 2070 Max-Q mobility parts, the flagship RTX 2080 Max-Q which isn't expected at the show, is still in the works, with its TU104M 1eab device ID having been leaked earlier. The rest of the GeForce 20-series mobility GPUs are likely to use the GTX moniker if NVIDIA's desktop lineup is anything to go by; however, that is merely speculation at this point.

NVIDIA TITAN RTX Graphics Card Launching Soon

NVIDIA is ready with its new flagship halo consumer graphics card, the TITAN RTX. Several video bloggers such as LinusTechTips have apparently already been sampled with this card, and are probably under NDA not to reveal specifications. Given that "Turing" is the only NVIDIA architecture capable of RTX, NVIDIA could be building the TITAN RTX on the largest "TU102" silicon. The GeForce RTX 2080 Ti does not max out this silicon, leaving NVIDIA room to do so with the TITAN RTX.

A maxed out "TU102" should feature 4,608 CUDA cores, 288 TMUs, 96 ROPs, in addition to 576 tensor cores and 72 RT cores. NVIDIA could also max out the 384-bit wide GDDR6 memory bus, and equip the TITAN RTX with 12 GB of video memory. Using 14 Gbps GDDR6 memory chips, NVIDIA can achieve 672 GB/s of memory bandwidth. The TITAN RTX card itself looks similar to the RTX 2080 Ti Founders Edition graphics card, but with an illuminated "TITAN" logo on top. The card still draws power from a pair of 8-pin PCIe power connectors, and it's likely that NVIDIA is using the same PCB, perhaps with additional capacitors. Pricing and availability is anyone's guess. Given that the RTX 2080 Ti Founders Edition was launched at $1,200, we agree with some of our community members' speculation that $1,800-2,000 doesn't seem implausible.

Update Dec 3: The Titan RTX has launched now for $2,499.

Colorful Announces iGame GeForce RTX 2070 Ultra OC Graphics Card

Colorful Technology Company Limited, professional manufacturer of graphics cards, motherboards and high-performance storage solutions proudly introduces the latest graphics in its prestigious iGame series of gaming equipment. The COLORFUL iGame GeForce RTX 2070 Ultra OC combines excellent cooling with excellent design to bring out the best of the new GeForce RTX graphics card from NVIDIA. Featuring the new Turing architecture to deliver real-time ray tracing, NVIDIA's new GeForce RTX series graphics card bring realism to life and COLORFUL's iGame GeForce RTX 2070 Ultra OC is your top choice.

The new graphics card joins the iGame family of high-performance graphics cards design for gamers that demand uncompromising performance to bring gamers the best gaming experience thanks to feedback from gamers themselves.

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060 Shows Up in Final Fantasy XV Benchmarks

The RTX family debuted with top of the line graphics cards, but the Turing era is just started and there will be new members joining those first products. One of the most expected is the RTX 2060, and now this new graphics card has been seen in Final Fantasy XV benchmarking database. This information should be taken with a grain of salt, but in the past this listing has showed us upcoming products such as the Radeon RX 590, so the evidence is quite interesting. According to this data, the RTX 2060 would perform slightly below the Radeon RX Vega 56 and NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070, but its numbers are quite better than those of the GTX 1060.

NVIDIA itself confirmed there would be a "mainstream" product in the Turing family in the future, and although the company seems now focused on selling out their excess inventory of mid-range Pascal graphics cards -Black Friday could help there-, the new GPU could be announced in the next few weeks and some analysts expect it to be available on Q1 2019. It'll be interesting to confirm if the data in our TPU database is correct, but we're specially curious about the price point it'll have.

Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus Getting Support for NVIDIA Turing's Adaptive Shading

You may remember that we covered in detail the new technologies being implemented on NVIDIA's new brainchild, Turing, back when the architecture and its whitepaper were initially announced. One of the pieces of technology we talked about back then was Content Adaptive Shading, a new technique that would allow for smart trade-offs in image quality for added performance - potentially allowing for increased overall rendering resolutions at a much lesser impact cost.

The tech is now simply known as Adaptive Shading, and it basically works as a post-process step that looks at previous frames to calculate which determine quality conditions for the next one - lowered detail areas such as skies, flat walls, or even shadowed portions of objects require lesser amounts of shading detail, and thus, their shading rates can be reduced from a per-pixel shading to four pixels per shading ratio. And this new feature, which was originally showcased on MachineGames' Wolfenstein II: The New Colossus, will finally be implemented in working form on that particular game, via a patch that's being released on November 19th. This is the first title to make use of this technology - and hopefully, it isn't the last.

NVIDIA Announces Financial Results for Third Quarter Fiscal 2019

NVIDIA today reported revenue for the third quarter ended Oct. 28, 2018, of $3.18 billion, up 21 percent from $2.64 billion a year earlier, and up 2 percent from $3.12 billion in the previous quarter. GAAP earnings per diluted share for the quarter were $1.97, up 48 percent from $1.33 a year ago and up 12 percent from $1.76 in the previous quarter. Non-GAAP earnings per diluted share were $1.84, up 38 percent from $1.33 a year earlier and down 5 percent from $1.94 in the previous quarter.

"AI is advancing at an incredible pace across the world, driving record revenues for our datacenter platforms," said Jensen Huang, founder and CEO of NVIDIA. "Our introduction of Turing GPUs is a giant leap for computer graphics and AI, bringing the magic of real-time ray tracing to games and the biggest generational performance improvements we have ever delivered.

NVIDIA Announces Quadro RTX 4000 Graphics Card

NVIDIA today introduced the Quadro RTX 4000 graphics card - the company's first midrange professional GPU powered by the NVIDIA Turing architecture and the NVIDIA RTX platform. Unveiled at the annual Autodesk University Conference in Las Vegas, the Quadro RTX 4000 puts real-time ray tracing within reach of a wider range of developers, designers and artists worldwide.

Professionals from the manufacturing, architecture, engineering and media creation industries witnessed a seismic shift in computer graphics with the launch of Turing in August. The field's greatest leap since the invention of the CUDA GPU in 2006, Turing features new RT Cores to accelerate ray tracing and next-gen Tensor Cores for AI inferencing which, together for the first time, make real-time ray tracing possible.

NVIDIA Releases GeForce 416.81 WHQL Drivers Fixing "Turing" Power Consumption

NVIDIA today released GeForce 416.81 WHQL drivers. These drivers provide optimization for "Battlefield V," which appears to be available to Origin Access users. In addition, the drivers significantly reduce Idle and Multi-monitor power-consumption of GeForce RTX 20-series graphics cards. It also corrects G-Sync issues with "Turing" GPUs. Stuttering noticed on the RTX 2080 Ti when playing back HEVC videos is also fixed. A number of game-specific fixes related to "ARK Survival," "Shadow of the Tomb Raider," "Witcher 3: Wild Hunt," "Monster Hunter World," and "Far Cry 5" were also fixed. Grab the drivers from the link below.
DOWNLOAD: NVIDIA GeForce 416.81 WHQL

The change-log follows.

NVIDIA Finally Fixes Multi-Monitor Power Consumption of Turing GeForce 20. Tested on RTX 2070, 2080 and 2080 Ti.

Today, NVIDIA released their GeForce 416.81 drivers, which among others, contains the following changelog entry: "[Turing GPU]: Multi-monitor idle power draw is very high. [2400161]". Back at launch in September, Turing was plagued with very high non-gaming power consumption, in both single-monitor and multi-monitor idle.

The company was quick to fix single-monitor power consumption, which we tested promptly. Unfortunately, at the time, multi-monitor power draw wasn't improved and people were starting to get worried that there might be some kind of unfixable issue present on Turing that would prevent NVIDIA from fixing multi-monitor power draw.

GeForce GTX 1080 Ti Supply is Reportedly Dwindling, Prices on the Rise

Multiple sources confirmed to GamersNexus that the GTX 1080 Ti is starting to be really difficult to find. Supplies are decreasing and the reason seems to be clear: NVIDIA could have stopped the production of those graphics cards. This has had an immediate effect on these cards' prices, which in the last few days have increased everywhere in the world. The performance differences with the new GeForce RTX 2080 are not that important if you don't need the RT part of the equation -we could confirm this on our own review-, but the price of these new graphics card have made considering a 1080 Ti a viable option for many users that are looking to upgrade their systems.

Prices for the RTX 2080 start at $769 at Newegg for example, while the cheapest GTX 1080 Ti costs $850 there. The story is the same at Amazon, where we can find the cheapest RTX 2080 at $799,99 versus the $878.12 for a used model of the GTX 1080 Ti. The high-end model of the Pascal series competes directly with the RTX 2080 and was cheaper not long ago, but that's not the story now. With prices climbing, some are claiming the same will happen to the GTX 1080, GTX 1070 or GTX 1070 Ti in the next few weeks. Reports of RTX 2080 and RTX 2080 Ti inexplicably dying on users could also be fueling consumer-fear, as well as a [temporary] erosion in the value proposition of the RTX 20-series itself, as Microsoft pulled Windows 10 1809 Update, leaving fewer people with DirectX Ray-tracing, the software foundation for RTX.

Colorful Debuts iGame GeForce RTX 2070 Vulcan X OC Graphics Card

Colorful Technology Company Limited, professional manufacturer of graphics cards, motherboards and high-performance storage solutions is proud to announce the newest inclusion in the premier COLORFUL Gaming line of iGame products with its most advanced RTX 2070 graphics card yet. The new COLORFUL iGame GeForce RTX 2070 takes the new Turing-powered GPU to its limits with improved Vulcan Thermal Design and a significant overclock out of the box with a simple press of a key. The iGame GeForce RTX 2070 Vulcan X OC joins the rest of the iGame family of gaming products that deliver the best quality from COLORFUL, refined with feedback from gamers themselves.

The iGame GeForce RTX 2070 Vulcan X OC integrates key design elements that allow it to operate cool to bring out the full potential of the GPU. New saw sickle fans improve static pressure up to 115% versus traditional fan designs which delivers improved cooling. Dual-ball bearings on the fans assure extended lifespan that will last for years all the while offering silent operation even in heavy load. The Vulcan cooling solution also integrates a Fan-Stop Technology to reduce noise to dead silence. The fans on the iGame GeForce RTX 2070 Vulcan X OC stops when its below 55°C. The compound heat pipes round off the GPU cooling which combines good thermal conductivity as well as phase transition to manage heat transfer from the GPU to the heatsink efficiently. COLORUFL has also taken time to implement a good MosFET cooling solution integrating the MosFET heatsink with the entire GPU cooling solution for improve power condition.

NVIDIA Confirms Issues Cropping Up With Turing-based Cards, "It's Not a Broad Issue"

It has been been making the rounds now on various forum sites (including our own TPU) that problems have been cropping up for users of NVIDIA's Turing-based architecture graphics cards. The reports, which are increasing in number as awareness of the issue increases, vary in their manifestation, but have the same result: "crashes, black screens, blue screen of death issues, artifacts and cards that fail to work entirely," as reported by the original Digital Trends piece.

Of course, at the time, problems with the source for the information were too great to properly discern whether or not this issue stood beyond the usual launch issues and failures that can (and will happen) to any kind of hardware. The fact that people with negative experiences would always be more vocal than those without any problem; the fact that some accounts on the reported forums were of doubtful intent; and that the same user could be posting across multiple forums would always put a stop to any serious measurement of the issue. Now, though, NVIDIA has come out with a statement regarding the issue, which at least recognizes its existence.

Patched NVFlash Allows RTX 20-series FE Cards to be Flashed with Custom BIOS

BIOS modder Vipeax has released a special patched version of NVFlash (version 5.527.0), the utility that allows you to extract and flash the video BIOS of your NVIDIA GeForce graphics card. This special version lets you to bypass NVIDIA restrictions and flash GeForce RTX 20-series Founders Edition (FE) graphics cards with BIOS ROMs of custom-design graphics cards. The official versions of NVFlash that support "Turing" GPUs report a "board ID mismatch" error when trying to do this, and an additional CLI parameter that made it ignore this warning, was removed by NVIDIA, effectively walling off Founders Edition cards from BIOS cross-flashing. You still can't flash the card with a BIOS you modified, because of NVIDIA's digital-signature restriction that has been in place since "Pascal," however, this new change could come handy if you want to flash your FE card with the BIOS of a custom-design card that is largely based on NVIDIA's reference-design PCB.

PC enthusiasts look to flash their Founders Edition cards with BIOS ROMs of custom-design graphics cards by other NVIDIA add-in card partners, mainly to increase power limits that allow the GPU to sustain boost frequencies better, and increase overclocking headroom. As an obligatory word of caution, use of NVFlash isn't covered by product warranties, and you use it at your own risk, especially when cross-flashing between cards that might have subtle differences. We manually checked the modified executable (not just Virustotal) and it doesn't contain any malware.
DOWNLOAD: NVIDIA NVFlash with Board ID Mismatch Disabled

EVGA GeForce RTX 2070 Series Now Available

The EVGA GeForce RTX 2070 Graphics Cards are powered by the all-new NVIDIA Turing architecture to give you incredible new levels of gaming realism, speed, power efficiency, and immersion. With the EVGA GeForce RTX 2070 gaming cards you get the best gaming experience with next generation graphics performance, ice cold cooling, and advanced overclocking features with the all new EVGA Precision X1 software.

The new NVIDIA GeForce RTX GPUs have reinvented graphics and set a new bar for performance. Powered by the new NVIDIA Turing GPU architecture and the revolutionary NVIDIA RTX platform, the new graphics cards bring together real-time ray tracing, artificial intelligence, and programmable shading. This is not only a whole new way to experience games - this is the ultimate PC gaming experience.

NVIDIA Readies TU104-based GeForce RTX 2070 Ti

Update: Gigabyte themselves have come out of the gates dismissing this as a typo on their part, which is disappointing, if not unexpected, considering that there is no real reason for NVIDIA to launch a new SKU to a market virtually absent of competition. Increased tiers of graphics card just give more options for the consumer, and why give an option that might drive customers away from more expensive graphics card options?

NVIDIA designed the $500 GeForce RTX 2070 based on its third largest silicon based on "Turing," the TU106. Reviews posted late Tuesday summarize the RTX 2070 to offer roughly the the same performance level as the GTX 1080 from the previous generation, at the same price. Generation-to-generation, the RTX 2070 offers roughly 30% more performance than the GTX 1070, but at 30% higher price, in stark contrast to the GTX 1070 offering 65% more performance than the GTX 970, at just 25% more price. NVIDIA's RTX varnish is still nowhere in sight. That said, NVIDIA is not on solid-ground with the RTX 2070, and there's a vast price gap between the RTX 2070 and the $800 RTX 2080. GIGABYTE all but confirmed the existence of an SKU in between.

Inno3D Announces its GeForce RTX 2070 Series Graphics Cards

INNO3D, a leading manufacturer of awesome high-end graphics hardware components and various innovations enriching your life, introduces a new family member to the INNO3D gaming graphics cards line, the GeForce RTX 2070. The line-up of this series will consist of the TWIN X2 and X2 OC version. Powered by the new NVIDIA Turing GPU architecture and the revolutionary NVIDIA RTX platform, the new graphics cards bring together real-time ray tracing, artificial intelligence, and programmable shading. This is not only a whole new way to experience games-this is the ultimate PC gaming experience.

The INNO3D GeForce RTX 2070 X2 OC Edition is designed for gamers who demand round-the-clock excellent performance with 24/7 gameplay. The intricate design for this cooling system comprises of 2 x 92mm ultra quiet fans, INNO3D unique Power Direct Cooling System (P.D.C.S), AI full-Stop-Mode technology and strand reinforcing backplate, offering the most efficient heat transfer and the best gaming performance at ultra-low noise levels.

TechPowerUp Releases GPU-Z 2.13.0

TechPowerUp today released GPU-Z 2.13.0, our graphics subsystem information, monitoring, and diagnostic utility. Version 2.13.0 introduces fixes to some of the major bugs reported by our users. To begin with, it corrects missing fan-speed sensors for pre-Turing NVIDIA graphics processors running on GeForce R400 release (or newer) drivers. Some rare crashes during GPU-Z start-up have been corrected. The "take screenshot" tooltip will no longer be part of the screenshot. We also improved the "minimize on close" behavior.
DOWNLOAD: TechPowerUp GPU-Z 2.13.0

The change-log follows.

TechPowerUp GPU-Z v2.12.0 Released

TechPowerUp GPU-Z v2.12.0 released today with useful new features and several stability updates. We worked extensively on the ability of GPU-Z to detect fake NVIDIA graphics cards (i.e cards not really having the GPU advertised on the box). GPU-Z now prepends "[FAKE]" to the Graphics Card name field, and lights up with a caution triangle. This capability is forward compatible for the supported GPUs (listed in the changelog), so for example, it will be able to detect a fake RTX 2060, which in reality uses a GK106 GPU. The second big feature is the ability to extract and upload graphics card BIOS of NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2000 graphics cards. Graphics cards with multiple independent fans (each with its own speed control) are gaining popularity, and we've added the ability to read and log fan-speeds of individual fans on NVIDIA "Turing" graphics cards that support the feature, in addition to fan speed percentage monitoring.

Our feature-rich "Advanced" tab now also shows information on HDMI and DisplayPort connectors of your graphics cards. Power-draw on NVIDIA graphics cards is now reported both as a percentage of TDP and as an absolute value in Watts. Among the bugs fixed are a system hang due to Valve Anti-Cheat (VAC) kicking in when GPU-Z is running in the background; memory bandwidth reading on RTX 2080 & RTX 2080 Ti with GDDR6 memory, AMD Radeon RX 400-series GPU utilization monitoring, and improved texts for system memory usage sensors.
DOWNLOAD: TechPowerUp GPU-Z v2.12.0

The change-log follows.

NVIDIA GeForce RTX 20-series Mobility mGPU Lineup Revealed

NVIDIA is giving finishing touches to its first GeForce RTX 20-series Mobility GPUs for notebooks, based on the "Turing" architecture, with product launches expected from Q1-2019. The company could debut the series with a high-end part first, the GeForce RTX 2080 Mobility Max-Q. The rest of the lineup includes the RTX 2070 Mobility Max-Q, RTX 2060 Ti Mobility, RTX 2060 Mobility, RTX 2050 Ti Mobility, and RTX 2050 Mobility. What's interesting about this list is that NVIDIA is limiting the Max-Q design to its top-tier RTX 2080 Mobility and RTX 2070 Mobility parts.

Max-Q is an all-encompassing laptop thermal-design methodology, which allows gaming notebook designers to come up with thinner notebooks with higher performance. One of the key aspects is special Max-Q ready variants of the GPUs, which are probably binned to run the coolest, and least voltages. With a device ID 1eab, the RTX 2080 Mobility Max-Q is based on the TU104M chip, while other SKUs could be carved from the TU106M or a chip even smaller. It's being reported that with this generation, NVIDIA is playing a more active role in helping its partners engineer their Max-Q notebooks, and helping them meet NVIDIA's strict Z-height minimums.

NVIDIA Quadro RTX 6000 and RTX 5000 Up for Pre-Order, Full TU102 at $6,300

NVIDIA opened up its "Turing" based Quadro RTX 6000 and RTX 5000 graphics cards up for pre-order on its website. The RTX 6000 is priced at USD $6,300, and a quantity limitation of 5 per customer is in place. The RTX 5000, on the other hand, is priced at $2,300, and is out of stock at the time of this writing. The RTX 6000 maxes out the TU102 silicon with 4,608 CUDA cores, 576 Tensor cores, 72 RT cores, and is armed with 24 GB of GDDR6 memory, across the chip's full 384-bit memory bus width, making it the cheapest graphics card that maxes out the silicon, unless NVIDIA comes up with a "TITAN X Turing." The Quadro series comes with an enterprise feature-set and certifications for major content-creation applications not available on the GeForce series.

The Quadro RTX 5000, on the other hand, maxes out the TU104 silicon with 3,072 CUDA cores, 384 Tensor cores, 48 RT cores, and 16 GB of GDDR6 memory across the chip's 256-bit wide memory interface. The $10,000 RTX 8000, which isn't open to pre-orders yet, arms the TU102 with a whopping 48 GB of memory, and higher clocks than the RTX 6000. NVIDIA debuted the "Turing" graphics architecture with the Quadro RTX series a week before the new GeForce RTX 20-series.

New NVFlash Released With Turing Support

With the latest release of NVIDIA's NVFlash, version 5.513.0, users can now read and write the BIOS on Turing based graphics cards. This includes the RTX 2080 Ti, 2080, and 2070. While this may seem mundane at first, due to the different power limits between graphics cards, there is some hope that cross flashing of the BIOS could result in tangible performance gains.

DOWNLOAD: NVIDIA NVFlash v5.513.0

NVIDIA Announces Availability of GeForce RTX 2070 Graphics Card - Cheapest Raytracing on October 17th

NVIDIA today announced official availability dates for what will forever be engraved in history as "the cheapest Turing" option - which contrary to what that might lead you to expect, isn't cheap at all. NVIDIA's RTX 2070 graphics card will be available starting October 17th, bringing the benefits of raytracing acceleration to a much lower price-point than the already-launched RTX 2080 and RTX 2080 Ti graphics cards.

That said, the RTX 2070 will still retail for $499 - a full $120 higher than NVIDIA's last-gen GTX 1070, and that's not counting what's being less-than-amicably called the "NVIDIA tax", which brings Founders' Editions pricing of the graphics cards up to $599, and allows AIB to increase pricing of their own designs up to that level - or higher. It's not a cheap option - especially considering how the RTX 2070 is now being built in the TU106 silicon, a smaller counterpart to the full-fledged TU104, and in contrast to the previous GTX 1070, which was built from the same chip as the GTX 1080).
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