Monday, March 8th 2010

Intel Steps into Alleged Counterfeit Core i7 920 Sale Issue

After last week's report on some of Newegg.com's customers receiving what the store calls "demo boxes" that it described to have been accidentally shipped by one of its "long term partners", Intel stepped in with a clarification on how it looks at these anomalies. In a statement to HardOCP.com, Intel's Dan Snyder said "Intel has been made aware of the potential for counterfeit i7 920 packages in the marketplace and is working to how many and/or where they are being sold. The examples we have seen are not Intel products but are counterfeits. Buyers should contact their place of purchase for a replacement and/or should contact their local law enforcement agency if the place of purchase refuses to help."

The "examples" Intel is referring to in the statement are these so-called "demo boxes", apparently 300 of them, which could be out on the loose. Meanwhile, Newegg.com is making efforts to get in touch with each of the affected customers and rush-delivering genuine merchandise or providing 100% refund, depending on what the customer chooses. While the whole episode seems to have taken a toll on Newegg's image as one of the most reliable, efficient, and competitive online retailers which it built over years, in the line of fire seems to be its "long term partner", a certain distributor in charge of these Intel processors. The same company sent cease and desist letters to some online publications to withdraw their reports on this issue, blaming them for publishing "untrue statements" about it. However Intel's statement adds clarity to the issue. Indeed some customers may have received "counterfeits", and indeed there are no such things as "demo boxes", at least as far as Intel is concerned. That said, whoever is behind these "demo boxes" still stands to face the law for infringement and imitation of Intel's product design, and trying to profit from it.
Sources: HardOCP.com, TechEYE.net
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104 Comments on Intel Steps into Alleged Counterfeit Core i7 920 Sale Issue

#101
yogurt_21
yeah I think newegg is handling the situation well, but the demo boxes lie (whther or not it originated form newegg) will cost them. I work in online education and yes customers can get peeved by an outage but they are actually very understanding "these things happen" they tell me. That is until they are lied to. Once the lie is there whether or not intentional they become irate lose trust and begin looking at doing business elswhere. Wehther or not I was told by programmign that the outage would only last another hour I never tell the customers that. Why? because if they're wrong and it lasts 2 I've violated the trust of the customers and lied to them. I'm only pasisng on what I've been told but all the same I've lied to the customers.

this is where the big issue is. Newegg should never have passed on that little nugget. The email should simply have read "We are still investigating the problem with the I7 920 cpu's for batch/shipment number XYZ. While we continue to investigate we are offering refunds or replacemnts for anyone who recieved and I7 920 for that batch/shipment number."

This avoids blaming the wrong person or telling the customers incorrect information. That way when Intel sends out an announcement, newegg doesn't look like a jack ass.
Posted on Reply
#102
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
HookeyStreet
LMAO @ those fakes. They arent even good ones :) I would expect a full refund or replacement and a little extra for my time being wasted ;)

What if some n00b actually stuck that, what looks like a piece of lead, onto his motherboard LMFAO
Read the thread, they are overnighting replacements to all the customers.

And anyone that would fall for this shouldn't be installing their own processor, as said before.

yogurt_21
yeah I think newegg is handling the situation well, but the demo boxes lie (whther or not it originated form newegg) will cost them. I work in online education and yes customers can get peeved by an outage but they are actually very understanding "these things happen" they tell me. That is until they are lied to. Once the lie is there whether or not intentional they become irate lose trust and begin looking at doing business elswhere. Wehther or not I was told by programmign that the outage would only last another hour I never tell the customers that. Why? because if they're wrong and it lasts 2 I've violated the trust of the customers and lied to them. I'm only pasisng on what I've been told but all the same I've lied to the customers.

this is where the big issue is. Newegg should never have passed on that little nugget. The email should simply have read "We are still investigating the problem with the I7 920 cpu's for batch/shipment number XYZ. While we continue to investigate we are offering refunds or replacemnts for anyone who recieved and I7 920 for that batch/shipment number."

This avoids blaming the wrong person or telling the customers incorrect information. That way when Intel sends out an announcement, newegg doesn't look like a jack ass.
I find that customers in general a pretty understanding, until lied to. However, they only tend to get peeved when the lie is something like "it will get to you tomorrow, and then it doesn't come for a week". When something like the newegg situation happens, they are pretty happy to believe anything they are told as long as they get what they paid for quickly.
Posted on Reply
#103
caleb
Yukikaze
If you were selling a product counterfeits of which would have cropped up, you would respond as well. This isn't about the theft.
Thats not even a counterfeit,Its a lame theft. It would be something worth mentioning in press if they would actually sell working CPU's with fake labels etc. not a pig in a poke. All Im wondering is why would a company as large as that even bother to react to a problem on such a tiny scale.
Posted on Reply
#104
DaedalusHelios
caleb
Thats not even a counterfeit,Its a lame theft. It would be something worth mentioning in press if they would actually sell working CPU's with fake labels etc. not a pig in a poke. All Im wondering is why would a company as large as that even bother to react to a problem on such a tiny scale.
Because news travels fast in a country that has more online than anywhere else in the world. ;)
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