Wednesday, January 18th 2012

Intel Introduces CPU Replacement Plan Targeting Overclockers

In an effort to offer some (extra) comfort to enthusiasts who like to overclock their processors, Intel has launched something called the 'Performance Tuning Protection Plan'. This offering basically ensures a no questions asked, single processor replacement, in the event of the 'death' of an overclocked CPU.

To take advantage of the Performance Tuning Protection Plan, which comes as an addition to the standard 3 year warranty (this one only covers CPUs that fail 'under normal usage') people are required to pay a one-time fee between $20 and $35, depending on the CPU model.

Intel's overclocker-friendly plan launches today (it's in a pilot phase for starters) and is available from four resellers - CyberPower, Scan Computers, Canada Computers and Electronics, Altech Computers, and through Intel.com.

The Performance Tuning Protection Plan covers the following chips:

Core i5-2500K - $20 (plan price)
Core i7-2600K - $25
Core i7-2700K - $25
Core i7-3930K - $35
Core i7-3960X - $35
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89 Comments on Intel Introduces CPU Replacement Plan Targeting Overclockers

#1
KieX
It's tempting...
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#2
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
eh i just dont tell them i overclocked it, just state it failed even though it was installed properly etc.
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#3
D4S4
i would say that this is unexpectedly nice but on the second thought, makes sense with the K models.
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#4
cheesy999
I take it you can only use it once?
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#5
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
Thats where You have to read the fine print of the Terms of service.
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#6
dogchainx
Hmm.....suicide runs take on a whole new meaning. 3.0 VID i7-3960X anyone?
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#7
phanbuey
Intel is freaking brilliant...

Not only for the suicide runs, but also for those people who say things like "OMG my core i5 hit 60C, it wil MELT."

Also alot of the OEM (i.e. alienware) system builders will buy in for their overclocked lines.

... Free money... It is almost as if they overclocked their processor sales :D
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#8
the54thvoid
I've read the small print and there appear to be no catches. Need the retail box to send it back in, and cannot send it back within 30 days of buying the plan. And as long as you don't physically tamper with the processor.

Wow..

This is really an awesome thing. If you know you're going to push that cpu to it's limits and beyond, this plan is a Godsend. Maybe Intel is asking people to go and break some overclock records.
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#9
Sasqui
the54thvoid, post: 2520438"
I've read the small print and there appear to be no catches. Need the retail box to send it back in, and cannot send it back within 30 days of buying the plan. And as long as you don't physically tamper with the processor.

Wow..

This is really an awesome thing. If you know you're going to push that cpu to it's limits and beyond, this plan is a Godsend. Maybe Intel is asking people to go and break some overclock records.
Yea, this is a new one. But then again, how many people have killed thier CPU by overclocking (not modding / or doing something stupid)? Raise your hands.
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#10
Disruptor4
Nice idea in essence, but I do wonder how useful it would really be.
eidairaman1, post: 2520405"
Thats where You have to read the fine print of the Terms of service.
I do wonder what it says. CBF reading it though.

the54thvoid, post: 2520438"
I've read the small print and there appear to be no catches. Need the retail box to send it back in, and cannot send it back within 30 days of buying the plan. And as long as you don't physically tamper with the processor.

Wow..

This is really an awesome thing. If you know you're going to push that cpu to it's limits and beyond, this plan is a Godsend. Maybe Intel is asking people to go and break some overclock records.
EDIT:

What stops you from destroying your CPU and then buying the plan, waiting 30 days (i'm sure majority of people could live) and then send it back?
Posted on Reply
#11
cadaveca
My name is Dave
Disruptor4, post: 2520442"
What stops you from destroying your CPU and then buying the plan, waiting 30 days (i'm sure majority of people could live) and then send it back?
It's one replacemetn per retail boxed CPU. They could simply mark the CPU they send as replacement properly, and you'd be SOL. Think like ES chips.


Anyway, I bought in. WTF not. $25 to cover my 2600k is no big deal to me. 5 GHz here i come :roll:
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#12
Frick
Fishfaced Nincompoop
Me like.
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#13
n-ster
Bravo! You don't like the OC potential of your CPU? Suicide run it and get a new one :p
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#14
mstenholm
Sasqui, post: 2520440"
Yea, this is a new one. But then again, how many people have killed thier CPU by overclocking (not modding / or doing something stupid)? Raise your hands.
Never killed one (got one runing at 90 C for ½ year). Got the feeling that mobo will die first. I would say it is a calculated move that Intel made here and they will not lose money on it.
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#15
Rowsol
This is easy money for microsoft. You'd be hard pressed to kill a chip as it is unless you are deliberately trying to cook it.
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#16
eidairaman1
The Exiled Airman
mstenholm, post: 2520475"
Never killed one (got one runing at 90 C for ½ year). Got the feeling that mobo will die first. I would say it is a calculated move that Intel made here and they will not lose money on it.
yup cuz once they do they will stop the service without any user notification. its just another money scheme. CPUs already have a warranty on them plus from etailers too. no sense in having to pay money for the same warranty, who would tell a company they overclocked the CPu and it failed on them?
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#17
Cristian_25H
Added a poll (thanks for the input W1zzard). Hope you like the choices :).
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#18
DrPepper
The Doctor is in the house
I like the idea of it especially if it encourages others to overclock. However for us who regularly overclock it's rather irrelevant. I don't think it should be standard on K/X as it would give them a reason to charge an extra 20-35 as standard.
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#19
Gzero
Rowsol, post: 2520488"
This is easy money for microsoft. You'd be hard pressed to kill a chip as it is unless you are deliberately trying to cook it.
Easy money for who? :p
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#20
Cristian_25H
DrPepper, post: 2520503"
I like the idea of it especially if it encourages others to overclock. However for us who regularly overclock it's rather irrelevant. I don't think it should be standard on K/X as it would give them a reason to charge an extra 20-35 as standard.
K models already have a premium over the non-K chips. Intel could maintain the price difference but add the Performance Tuning Protection Plan. 'Could' is the key word here ;) .
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#21
Morgoth
i hope intel does the same for xeon series 55/56 and higher
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#22
Delta6326
Intel is going to loose some money on this..Well at least from the suicide runners go out get a $1000 CPU add $35 get a insane world record, call Intel No questions asked get your new replacement and use it for other stuff.:rockout:
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#23
20mmrain
Well I will tell U I just ordered it.... I figure it will be a great selling point when I sell this CPU plus.... If I burn it up when overclocking I am covered!
But think about it.... I bet I can at least charge 20 Bucks more for my cpu when I sell it just because this coverage. Most people can't say that to do that.
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#24
Steevo
Out of 100 CPU's sold only 5 may be overclocked. So sell 3 of those 5 people a "plan".

Out of 5 that are going to overclock 1 might blow a processor.

Out of 80% of their CPU returns 75% are might be due to overclocked damage they can't prove and they lose 100% of profit.

Anything they can recoup is just going to help cover their cost, and determine how much of their actual userbase/sales failure is due to operating beyond official specs and thus if it is worth it to lock the processors.


Anytime a company like Intel does something just follow the money and it will make sense.
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#25
Paulieg
Steevo, post: 2520534"
Out of 100 CPU's sold only 5 may be overclocked. So sell 3 of those 5 people a "plan".

Out of 5 that are going to overclock 1 might blow a processor.

Out of 80% of their CPU returns 75% are might be due to overclocked damage they can't prove and they lose 100% of profit.

Anything they can recoup is just going to help cover their cost, and determine how much of their actual userbase/sales failure is due to operating beyond official specs and thus if it is worth it to lock the processors.


Anytime a company like Intel does something just follow the money and it will make sense.
Exactly. In this case though, it's a nice little insurance plan on the cheap, for those of us who push our chips more than a little. I've not killed a chip, after owning and overclocking over 100 chips, but it's good peace of mind. It also means that you don't have to lie if you do kill one. :laugh:
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