Tuesday, December 11th 2012

Intel Core "Haswell" Quad-Core Desktop CPU Lineup Detailed

2013 promises to be another year, with another new line of processors by Intel, and like every alternate year, the company will introduce a new client desktop CPU socket. With its 4th generation Core "Haswell" processor family, Intel will introduce a brand new CPU architecture that steps up IPC over current Core "Ivy Bridge," hence, Intel's Core desktop processor lineup will not ship with higher clock speeds, yet higher performance. The new chips will be built in the LGA1150 package, and will be accompanied by Intel's 8-series "Lynx Point" chipset.

By Q2-2013, Intel will have launched as many as 14 Core desktop CPU models, including six in the mainline, and eight power-optimized ones. Its nomenclature is somewhat similar to that of current Core "Ivy Bridge" lineup, except the 4000-series numbering. Leading the pack is the Core i7-4770K (unlocked) and i7-4770, clocked at 3.50 GHz with 3.90 GHz Turbo Boost, featuring eight threads with HyperThreading, 8 MB of L3 cache, Intel HD Graphics 4600 iGPU clocked up to 1250 MHz, with 84W TDP; followed by Core i5-4670K (unlocked) and i5-4670 clocked at 3.40 GHz with 3.80 GHz Turbo Boost, and 6 MB L3 cache. The Core i5-4570 and i5-4430 are clocked at 3.20 GHz (3.60 GHz Turbo) and 3.00 GHz (3.20 Turbo).
Intel's mainline Core desktop processor lineup is overshadowed by as many as eight energy-efficient processor models. The Core i7/i5 "S" series reduce TDP to 65W while maintaining clock speeds, while Core i7/i5 "T" series reduce TDP to 45W, with a little help from lower clock speeds.Source: VR-Zone
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64 Comments on Intel Core "Haswell" Quad-Core Desktop CPU Lineup Detailed

#1
Jizzler
Fourstaff said:
And the reason mainstream needs 6 cores is ... ?
Because it would be easier for the rest of us to get them of course.


Dj-ElectriC said:
K CPUs dont get VT, why? becuase F@#k you thats why :D
Note to self: Never consider K models and that one S model.

Back in my day, only had to remember one set of specs per CPU family and the only variable was the Mhz/Ghz of each model. Now there's exceptions all over the place and some of my most visited links are the CPU lists at Wikipedia and ark.intel.com.
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#2
ensabrenoir
Harry Lloyd said:
Wow, what a fail. Exactly the same clocks. What is the point of these CPUs? The tick-tock is now completely pointless. Same clocks, same number of cores, and a 10% architecture performance boost? What a waste of money for whoever upgrades from Sandy or Ivy, especially considering a new mobo is needed.

Unfortunately this is AMD's fault. Intel can do whatever they want without competition.
,,,:wtf:.... research & re-read and you'll see the benefits. And to all the "PRICERS" who constantly complain about intel prices...If you want a Porsche with Porsche performance you gotta pay Porsche prices,,,, don't worry though hyundai will always make something... almost... just kinda ...sorta like it ....minus the performance, quality and class. Which ever one fits you... go with it
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#3
radrok
Well to be honest there isn't that much to complain about Intel prices, at least they haven't been increasing them for their mainstream platform lately, as far as I remember though.

I do agree that if there was a bit of competition on the higher end we could've had lower prices / more cores.

Also mainstream needs 6 cores so the HEDT platform gets more than 6 stagnant cores we've been having since Gulftown.
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#4
Delta6326
Awesome news indeed, can't wait to get rid of this Q6600, I want the i7 4770K or T/S dunno if I will OC, they are already fast enough.
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#5
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
Octavean said:
Not so sure that is 100% accurate in all cases:

Intel Fixes VT-d Bug in Sandy Bridge-E CPUs

http://ark.intel.com/products/70845/Intel-Core-i7-3970X-Processor-Extreme-Edition-15M-Cache-3_50-GHz

So apparently there are “K” series processors with VT-d support,….

***edit***

Even the Sandy Bridge-E Core i7 3820 has VT-d support and while not an unlocked "K" series part it can still be OCed:

http://ark.intel.com/products/63698
Of course it isn't 100% accurate in all cases. But it is probably accurate in 99% of cases. VT-d is a high level professional feature, and when used in that kind of professional environment people don't overclock. The instability risk isn't worth it. I'm sure there are a few enthusiasts that might like to play around with VT-d, but that isn't what the technology was developed for.

And yes, Sandy Bridge-E is a totally different beast. Every processor can be overclocked on that platform due to the way the platform is designed. That doesn't mean everyone overclocks that use it.

And don't confuse the Extreme edition processor with K series processors. The Extreme Edition processor offer more than just an unlocked multiplier. Professionals do use those processors and don't overclock them. There is no locked equivalent to the 3970X, it is just a flat out bad ass processor. However, there are locked equivalents to the K series processors. There is a 3770 that matches the 3770K, the K is unlocked and the non-K has VT-d.

Jizzler said:
Note to self: Never consider K models and that one S model.

Back in my day, only had to remember one set of specs per CPU family and the only variable was the Mhz/Ghz of each model. Now there's exceptions all over the place and some of my most visited links are the CPU lists at Wikipedia and ark.intel.com.
Read my post, the K processors do have VT.

And exactly how far back is "your day"? I mean even going back to 80386 different models had different sets of specs.
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#6
The Von Matrices
Jizzler said:
Back in my day, only had to remember one set of specs per CPU family and the only variable was the Mhz/Ghz of each model. Now there's exceptions all over the place and some of my most visited links are the CPU lists at Wikipedia and ark.intel.com.
Well, there is one less variable to consider: all the processors have the same integrated graphics (within 50MHz). Of course, that could mean that all the desktop processors have the GT1 graphics, which would be a shame, but I remain optimistic that they all have the GT2 version.

Edit: I also like the 35W desktop quad cores.
Posted on Reply
#7
Octavean
newtekie1 said:
Of course it isn't 100% accurate in all cases. But it is probably accurate in 99% of cases. VT-d is a high level professional feature, and when used in that kind of professional environment people don't overclock. The instability risk isn't worth it. I'm sure there are a few enthusiasts that might like to play around with VT-d, but that isn't what the technology was developed for.

And yes, Sandy Bridge-E is a totally different beast. Every processor can be overclocked on that platform due to the way the platform is designed. That doesn't mean everyone overclocks that use it.

And don't confuse the Extreme edition processor with K series processors. The Extreme Edition processor offer more than just an unlocked multiplier. Professionals do use those processors and don't overclock them. There is no locked equivalent to the 3970X, it is just a flat out bad ass processor. However, there are locked equivalents to the K series processors. There is a 3770 that matches the 3770K, the K is unlocked and the non-K has VT-d.
Perhaps you misunderstood what I was trying to say with respect to your earlier post newtekie1.

I was only pointing out that the LGA2011 platform has processors that can OC and have VT-d (3970X, 3960X, 3930K and 3820). The “K” nomenclature is peppered in there as you know. As far as I know all the Sandy Brdige-E processors C2 stepping and above have functional VT-d support in hardware with OC support and that includes the Core i7 3930K.

There aren’t that many “K” processors to begin with. Considering only the most current processor line available (Ivy Bridge and Sandy Bridge-E) the percentage of K processors that support VT-d is 33.3% or 1/3 (out of the 3930K, 3770K and 3570K). If you consider OCable processors as a metric all the Sandy Bridge-E processors can OC so the percentage there (with Ivy Bridge) with respect to VT-d support would be 60% with VT-d support.

The value of OC + VT-d is up to the individual. I agree that most people who want one of these features doesn’t necessarily care about the other.
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#8
Binge
Overclocking Surrealism
hardcore_gamer said:
It would have of been nice if they kept the same TDP as ivy and increased the clock speeds instead.
What??? that's like saying to lower the TDP and keep the same clocks. When -YOU- overclock the proc it will have TDP like ivy bridge lol.
Posted on Reply
#9
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
Octavean said:
Perhaps you misunderstood what I was trying to say with respect to your earlier post newtekie1.

I was only pointing out that the LGA2011 platform has processors that can OC and have VT-d (3970X, 3960X, 3930K and 3820). The “K” nomenclature is peppered in there as you know. As far as I know all the Sandy Brdige-E processors C2 stepping and above have functional VT-d support in hardware with OC support and that includes the Core i7 3930K.

There aren’t that many “K” processors to begin with. Considering only the most current processor line available (Ivy Bridge and Sandy Bridge-E) the percentage of K processors that support VT-d is 33.3% or 1/3 (out of the 3930K, 3770K and 3570K). If you consider OCable processors as a metric all the Sandy Bridge-E processors can OC so the percentage there (with Ivy Bridge) with respect to VT-d support would be 60% with VT-d support.

The value of OC + VT-d is up to the individual. I agree that most people who want one of these features doesn’t necessarily care about the other.
But what I'm saying is that the 2011 platform is a totally different beast. Every processor is overclockable. And the processors that do have unlocked multipliers don't have equivalents that are locked. For example, there is no standard 3930, there is only the 3930K. So if someone wants that level of performance, even if they plan to run it at stock, the 3930K is the only option, so including VT-d is a must on that processor. However, on the mainstream platform that isn't the case. There is a 3770 and a 3570, so including VT-d on the K processors isn't necessary. If someone wants VT-d they are going buy the 3770 not the 3770K.
Posted on Reply
#10
Jizzler
newtekie1 said:
Read my post, the K processors do have VT.

And exactly how far back is "your day"? I mean even going back to 80386 different models had different sets of specs.
Oh, I know. Whether it's VT/VT-d or just VT-d doesn't change whether I'd ever buy them. I simply found DJ's post the most accurate description of Intel's reasoning. "Fvck you, that's why!" works as an answer to "Why?" 97% percent of the time. The other 3% I actually see a clear reason as to why Intel chose to do what they did.
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#11
newtekie1
Semi-Retired Folder
Jizzler said:
Oh, I know. Whether it's VT/VT-d or just VT-d doesn't change whether I'd ever buy them. I simply found DJ's post the most accurate description of Intel's reasoning. "Fvck you, that's why!" works as an answer to "Why?" 97% percent of the time. The other 3% I actually see a clear reason as to why Intel chose to do what they did.
In this case the reasoning is that people buying the K processors are extremely unlikely to ever use VT-d.
Posted on Reply
#12
SIGSEGV
Covert_Death said:
yea blame AMD cause that's the fun thing to do :rolleyes:

if your going to blame someone blame the software and game companies out there that still live in the 90's and refuse to code for 4+ Cores still... yes it's a littler harder to do but damn get with the times it's what NEEDS to be done
lol, indeed..
when intel release something news or rumor on their upcoming processor line up, i'm just laughing :laugh:
Posted on Reply
#13
radrok
newtekie1 said:
But what I'm saying is that the 2011 platform is a totally different beast. Every processor is overclockable. And the processors that do have unlocked multipliers don't have equivalents that are locked. For example, there is no standard 3930, there is only the 3930K. So if someone wants that level of performance, even if they plan to run it at stock, the 3930K is the only option, so including VT-d is a must on that processor. However, on the mainstream platform that isn't the case. There is a 3770 and a 3570, so including VT-d on the K processors isn't necessary. If someone wants VT-d they are going buy the 3770 not the 3770K.
You could always buy a skt 2011 Xeon, the high clocked 6 core variant doesn't cost much more than a 3930K, there are 6 cores under 3930K price point too if I'm not mistaken.
Posted on Reply
#14
Nihilus
Harry Lloyd said:
Wow, what a fail. Exactly the same clocks. What is the point of these CPUs? The tick-tock is now completely pointless. Same clocks, same number of cores, and a 10% architecture performance boost? What a waste of money for whoever upgrades from Sandy or Ivy, especially considering a new mobo is needed.

Unfortunately this is AMD's fault. Intel can do whatever they want without competition.
The core 2 had lower clocks than the pentium 4 and that worked out pretty well. Don't judge on something that hasn't been benched yet. Sandy Bridge was your 5.4L Triton engine. Ivy Bridge added 3v per cylinder. Haswell is your spanking new Coyote 5.0L - Still 8 cylinders, runs at similar RPM's, but much more powerful! AMD would be your 5.3L Chevy.... still using OHV.
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