Tuesday, September 30th 2014

First ARM Cortex-A57-Based Hadoop Demonstration Achieved on AMD Opteron A-Series

AMD (NYSE: AMD) today will make the first public demonstration of Apache Hadoop running on an ARM Cortex-A57-based AMD Opteron A-Series processor. In a technical session at the JavaOne conference to be delivered this afternoon by AMD corporate fellow Leendert van Doorn, the company will show how the expanding AMD Opteron A-Series server software ecosystem now includes Hadoop, the Java-based framework for storage and large-scale data processing. In addition, Henrik Stahl, vice president, Java product management and Internet of Things at Oracle, will join van Doorn on stage to discuss Oracle's support for AMD's 64-bit ARM server architecture.

Hadoop, a distributed processing technology used primarily for big data analysis, is a rapidly expanding market expected to reach upward of $50 billion by 2020. The combination of 64-bit ARM-based servers and Hadoop is designed to accelerate the changing economics of large-scale computing by enabling distributed processing across clusters of ARM-based servers. Running on the recently announced AMD Opteron A1100 development platform, the demonstration will feature Apache Hadoop running on the Oracle JDK. Leendert will also show multiple nodes running the same demonstration using Linux environments based on Fedora technology from the Red Hat-sponsored Fedora community and the community supported OpenSUSE Project.

"This demonstration showcases AMD's leadership in the development of a robust, standards-based ecosystem for ARM servers," said van Doorn. "Servers powered by AMD Opteron A-Series processors are well-suited for Hadoop, offering an efficient scale-out compute platform that can also double as an economical persistent storage platform."
AMD continues to drive innovation in the server ecosystem by enabling virtually seamless software and tools integration across both the x86 and ARM architecture environments. Through its collaboration with partners such as ARM, Linaro, Oracle, Red Hat and SUSE, AMD is providing users access to a complete development environment for ARM based applications and cross-platform support.
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7 Comments on First ARM Cortex-A57-Based Hadoop Demonstration Achieved on AMD Opteron A-Series

#1
jigar2speed
First serious shot by ARM's vendor on server market - here's hoping AMD succeeds to stay relevant.
Posted on Reply
#3
Vinska
Despite my massive liking towards AMD...

>involves Java

off to the trash it goes.
Posted on Reply
#4
Patriot
Vinska said:
Despite my massive liking towards AMD...

>involves Java

off to the trash it goes.
You would be surprised how many big data solutions use java... not that I think its a good idea.
Posted on Reply
#5
Vinska
Patriot said:
You would be surprised how many big data solutions use java... not that I think its a good idea.
I wouldn't be surprised because I simply know.
I just despise Java to no end.
Posted on Reply
#6
Aquinus
Resident Wat-man
Vinska said:
Despite my massive liking towards AMD...

>involves Java

off to the trash it goes.
Patriot said:
You would be surprised how many big data solutions use java... not that I think its a good idea.
Vinska said:
I wouldn't be surprised because I simply know.
I just despise Java to no end.
Why? Other than possibly having bugs and security holes like any other peice of software what about Java do you loathe so much because I find your distaste for it to be repugnant considering you two say nothing about what is bad about Java. I write Clojure which compiles down to JVM byte-code and one of the things that the language leverages is the JVM's threading libraries; it is a language written to facilitate multi-threaded programming. So while you say you dislike "Java" and I'll agree that the language and syntax of Java itself blows, but the JVM itself is a great platform and it's even better with an ARM box because of things like Jazelle. So, all in all, choose your words with more precision and if you can't differentiate Java from the JVM and be able to make your argument, then your argument is empty to begin with.

Also, this isn't the place to rail on Java though. If you want to do that, do it in another thread.
Posted on Reply
#7
Jorge
Another good move for AMD to leverage their IP. Consumers are the ones who benefit.
Posted on Reply