Friday, February 6th 2015

DeepCool Announces GamerStorm Assassin II CPU Cooler

DeepCool rolled out the second generation of its GamerStorm Assassin type-D twin-stack CPU cooler. The Assassin II is huge, measuring in at 143 mm x 158 mm x 167 mm (WxDxH), weighing 1.48 kg (including fans). Its design consists of a large nickel-plated copper base, from which eight nicke-plated copper heat pipes pass through, conveying heat to two aluminium fin stacks. The two stacks are not of the same shape.

One of the two fin stacks features an edge that's pointing towards the rear of your case, and hence you can't strap three fans onto this heatsink, just a push fan, and a conveyor between the two fin-stacks, but not a pull fan. The push fan is a 120 mm spinner, running between 300 and 1,400 RPM, pushing up to 68.06 CFM of air, with a noise output ranging between 17.8 to 27.3 dBA. The conveyor fan is a 140 mm spinner, clocking 300 to 1,200 RPM, pushing up to 70.08 CFM of air, with a noise output ranging between 17.8 and 27.3 dBA. The Assassin II can handle all modern CPU socket types, including LGA2011v3, LGA1150, AM3+, and FM2+. DeepCool didn't mention if the cooler is good enough for 220W TDP chips such as the AMD FX-9000 series.
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32 Comments on DeepCool Announces GamerStorm Assassin II CPU Cooler

#26
xfia
well.. just off topic anyway.

air cooling a 220w cpu was the subject and a figure of 300w+ with customization was thrown in witch really makes no since to me.

for me I would forget about air cooling for that tdp but if someone insisted on trying air cooling I would say go for the d15 or v8gts along with the highest cfm case fans you can find for having a chance at it working out.
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#27
SteveS45
Heatsink companies up the marketed TDP just as another number for people to compare and make you think 400>399watt so it is better.

Cooling comes down to so many factors, and performance on different platforms (LGA2011 to 1150 to AMD) is so much different due to socket form factors, heat generated, die location etc. Optimization is the key to all this. More heatpipes and bigger CFM does not always give you equal gains in performance.

And also regarding people posting that using liquid cooling/ Air cooling that their temps can go below ambient? It's not possible period. Air/liquid cooling is about thermal transfer, taking heat from the CPU and releasing it into the environment.
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#29
SteveS45
xfia
http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/275185-29-exploring-ambient-water-cooling
this is what I looked at first and he does explain quite a bit..

I would like to see AMD put a stamp of approval on some air coolers if they can really get the job done.
That is not what others meant by "you cannot cool anything colder than ambient." By introducing ice water, the temperature of the ice is calculated into the heat exchange system. "Cooling colder than ambient" would mean that you can get one specific object colder than the overall temperature in the whole system (thermal system not PC system.) It would be like expecting the CPU to get colder than the ice water introduced into the water cooling system. Nope, it's not physically possible.
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#30
SteveS45
Also, regarding AIO water cooling it does have it's advantages. The true advantage of water cooling is the high amount/volume of heat that it can carry away from the CPU with water in a tubing system. 6mm heatpipes in general each has a heat carrying capacity of between 20~40 watts of TDP depending on it's quality. So for a 6-8 pipe air cooler, you're looking at around 120~320 watts of TDP being carried away from the CPU. Water cooling has the advantage of a much higher TDP capacity. But this is only heat carried away from the CPU, eventually the water or heatpipes still need air based heat exchange from the radiator or the heatsink fins. Air blows through the radiator and fins to carry that heat into the environment. So in the end AIOs/CLC's still depend on the efficiency of the radiators to release heat from the water into the metal then into the air. AIO's do their job, but it's nothing more advanced than Air cooling. Heatpipes on the other hand are actually the high tech component in comparison. Heatpipes actually use the phase changing cycle of water particles ( liquid water -> steam -> back to liquid) to transfer heat energy up and down the heatpipes in a continuous cycle.
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#31
xfia
this thread looks a little silly now that Im reading over it.. haha

DC made a pretty decent cooler and thats that..
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#32
Prima.Vera
WTF is with all of those stupid name schemes?? Assassin Cooler, Killer NIC, etc. We need some more original name as Rapist SB, Murderer RAM, Terrorist CAM, and such...
pfff
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