Tuesday, September 22nd 2015

NVIDIA Releases Full-featured GeForce GTX 980 for Notebooks

NVIDIA released a reference board for a full-featured GeForce GTX 980 GPU for the notebook platform. This is different from the GeForce GTX 980M launched last October, which features just 1,536 of the 2,048 CUDA cores physically present on the GM204 silicon. The new GTX 980 for notebooks is targeted at large desktop-replacement gaming notebooks, and features all components present on the silicon.

The GeForce GTX 980 for Notebooks reference board features 4-8 GB of GDDR5 memory across the chip's 256-bit wide memory bus, a 4-8 phase VRM, and clock speeds which are close to the desktop reference board. The GPU is clocked around 1175 MHz, and the memory ticks at 7.00 GHz (GDDR5-effective). It's primed for overclocking beyond 1400 MHz core, and 7.50 GHz memory. It also offers fan-control for users, that adjusts clock speeds according to the fan-curve. Various gaming notebook makers are announcing variants of their premium notebooks featuring this board.
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39 Comments on NVIDIA Releases Full-featured GeForce GTX 980 for Notebooks

#1
GhostRyder
Now this is news!!! I want to see what can be done with one of these in a notebook!!!
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#2
Prima.Vera
How can you tell between the 2 variants?? What is the naming convention??
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#3
ArdWar
Prima.Vera, post: 3348121, member: 98685"
How can you tell between the 2 variants?? What is the naming convention??
No "M"?
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#4
Prima.Vera
That's crap, because the mobile variant is NOT the same as the desktop one. Just look at the BUS and VRAM speeds...
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#5
ArdWar
Already done with the whole "Ti" thing. Add/remove the Ti and you got even different architecture.

TITAN M anyone?
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#6
ab3e
I've seen this but Asus in the ROG series had an external bulky THING attached to the Laptop this for the extra power and heating issues that a gtx980 on a laptop brings. Now if there is no need for that call me impressed. With the nano series I expect nothing less from ATI for the new mobility series :).
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#7
Lionheart
Pretty impressive if you ask me if noise levels & temps are in check. What scares me would be the price :eek:
?
Wonder if AMD could fit a R9 Nano into a laptop :rolleyes:
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#8
phanbuey
That's going to burn your nuts off.
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#9
lZKoce
phanbuey, post: 3348144, member: 45008"
That's going to burn your nuts off.
+1 my first thought. We might be wrong though. Gaming laptops tend to have sturdy cooling solutions.
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#10
Prima.Vera
What's next? A power brick with 500W Amperage and 5Kg?? :D :D :D
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#11
Brusfantomet
Its not the first time Nvidia have done this. I remember the 7900 GT go, it was just the same chip as a 7900 GT but with lower clocks. I had it in a Dell Inspirion 9400, a big 17" thing that managed 2 hours of light use, or 30 min of gaming.
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#12
btarunr
Editor & Senior Moderator
phanbuey, post: 3348144, member: 45008"
That's going to burn your nuts off.
Not deez nuts.
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#13
xorbe
Guys this is for luggable gaming, not your average high-end laptop.
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#14
Toothless
Tech, Games, and TPU!
Soooo combine this with that laptop that can run a full-fledged 4790k and i'll gladly pay $3,000 for that laptop.
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#15
yogurt_21
considering the 980m is already 900$ by itself what's this going to cost? 1200$?

Not to mention we already have 980m sli and 970m sli, what role could this possibly fill?
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#16
Ferrum Master
The board itself looks like crap assembled by hands with soldering iron spilled anywhere it can... brzz they should avoid such horrid images for PR releases.
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#17
Sihastru
LOL, leave it to AMD fanboys to find everything wrong with having diversity in the mobile segment. It's a valid choice, you can now have a desktop class GPU in your laptop with the actual desktop GPU performance (within 5%). And yes, nVIDIA is working with laptop manufacturers to get unlocked Intel CPUs in these machines.

If this was a Fury/X/Nano it would've been gold. And in case you missed it, this IS nVIDIA's Nano, same principle, harvested chips that achieve incredible performance per watt. And a much smaller form factor.
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#18
xorbe
Sihastru, post: 3348254, member: 69811"
LOL, leave it to AMD fanboys
Wat? Every poster in this thread so far has an Intel CPU listed in their system specs. The one poster that mentioned AMD Nano has an nVidia graphics card.
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#19
Sihastru
So, what's wrong with having the option for a GTX 980 with 8GB of VRAM in a laptop? Wouldn't power consumption (abysmal battery) and heat (if the manufacturer has no idea how to build a laptop) be the acceptable trade off for portability?
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#20
xorbe
Sihastru, post: 3348263, member: 69811"
So, what's wrong with having the option for a GTX 980 with 8GB of VRAM in a laptop? Wouldn't power consumption (abysmal battery) and heat (if the manufacturer has no idea how to build a laptop) be the acceptable trade off for portability?
I think these portable gaming monsters are generally plugged into the wall. (/. post said it well, think of the battery as a UPS for moving rooms.)
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#21
Xzibit
xorbe, post: 3348271, member: 102945"
I think these portable gaming monsters are generally plugged into the wall. (/. post said it well, think of the battery as a UPS for moving rooms.)
Pretty much.

Once you un-plug them everything throttles down for battery. You aren't going to be pulling 100W+ off a battery. Drain it too fast and Tegra shield all over again..
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#22
Sihastru
So? What's wrong with that? Does it not make it possible for a road warrior type of person to game extremely well on a laptop? The right tool for the job. If you never live your basement, then this isn't for you.
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#23
yogurt_21
Sihastru, post: 3348302, member: 69811"
So? What's wrong with that? Does it not make it possible for a road warrior type of person to game extremely well on a laptop? The right tool for the job. If you never live your basement, then this isn't for you.
980m is the right tool for the job, need more than that go 970m sli and if you really need it 980m sli. This is the wrong tool for the job a full blown 980 draws more power than either 970m sli or 980m sli. Ie more power draw, more heat, less performance.

wtf is the point then?
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#24
Sihastru
Only it's not a "full blown 980"... it's a low power 980, that has most of the performance of the "full blown 980". Up until now we were complaining that the M versions of the cards have lower performance then the desktop versions. Now we finally get a 980 in a laptop that has the same performance as the desktop 980, and it's somehow a bad thing.

I does not consume more power then 970M SLI or 980M SLI. 970M SLI is 162W+, while 980M SLI is 200W+. The 980 "laptop edition" is around 100W because of the GPU binning process. So 35% more performance for about the same power consumption. The power bricks for these laptops are at around 160W, for the entire laptop.
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#25
xorbe
"Full blown" means it has all the gpu hardware, at least that's what I think of. It shouldn't surprise anyone that the clocks would be adjusted for a semi-mobile form factor.

Yogurt, where did you get that a single mobile 980 will be more power hungry than 980M SLI? Just curious. Many people such as myself don't want anything to do with potential SLI or CFX hassles. We'd rather pay for the most capable single gpu solution.

Speaking of which, a semi-mobile Titan X should be faster than mobile 980, and completely doable. But for 1920x1080 possibly mostly pointless.
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