Wednesday, September 30th 2015

Shuttle Shows off its Smallest Ever PC Solution

The demand for increasingly small, but high-performance PC solutions has now been met by four versions of Shuttle's NC01U model. These 29 mm slim barebones are based on the latest Broadwell generation of Intel processors. In order to cover as many areas of application as possible, they come with a selection of soldered processors ranging from Celeron, Core i3, Core i5 to even Core i7.

Their array of connectivity options helps them stand out from the crowd of NUC form factor machines. The NC01U features a Mini-DisplayPort, HDMI, Intel Gigabit Ethernet, audio, USB 3.0, USB 2.0, RS-232 and an M.2 slot. A replaceable wireless combo module for WLAN (802.11ac) and Bluetooth connectivity also comes already fitted. The case can accommodate one 2.5" drive (SSD or HDD). The two USB 3.0 ports on the front enable rapid charging of mobile devices. Each of the NC01U models can hold up to 16 GB of DDR3L SO-DIMM memory.
All NC01U machines with an Intel Core processor are capable of fluent playback of 4K Ultra-HD (3840 x 2160) content. The image signal is then transmitted at 60 Hz via Mini-DisplayPort or at 30 Hz via HDMI.

Another special feature of these low-energy barebones is the external PCI-Express slot on the bottom. This can be used to connect future external expansion kits such as dedicated AMD and NVIDIA graphics cards, an additional 2.5" drive, network interface or further USB and serial interfaces. Further details will be unveiled in the near future.

The NC01U has a whisper-quiet heatpipe cooling system and measures just 141 x 141 x 29 mm (DWH). Thanks to the supplied VESA mount, all versions can be fitted to any surface and to compatible monitors so they virtually disappear from the desktop.

Model versions
Shuttle XPC nano NC01U with Intel Celeron 3205U Shuttle XPC nano NC01U3 with Intel Core i3-5005U Shuttle XPC nano NC01U5 with Intel Core i5-5200U Shuttle XPC nano NC01U7 with Intel Core i7-5500U.

Shuttle's recommended retail price for the NC01U barebone is 140.00 Euro, for the NC01U3 314.00 Euro, for the NC01U5 388.00 EUR and for the NC01U7 520.00 Euro (all ex VAT). Upon launch, all specified models were available from specialist retailers across Europe, apart from the NC01U7 which should be available from the end of October.
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25 Comments on Shuttle Shows off its Smallest Ever PC Solution

#1
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
Are these coming to America? NC01U3 is tempting at under $400.
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#2
AsRock
TPU addict
Were the holes for the output of hot air ?. lol
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#3
lZKoce
"AsRock said:
Were the holes for the output of hot air ?. lol
It's blowing through the Kensigton lock ;)
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#4
bug
What does "latest Broadwell generation of Intel processors" mean? There's only one Broadwell generation and it isn't intel's latest.
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#5
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
There's no low power Skylakes out yet so it makes sense that it would get Broadwell and that's not necessarily a bad thing because as far as Intel chips are concerned, Broadwell has the most powerful GPU to date.
Posted on Reply
#6
Chaitanya
Has a serial port, should make a good PC for running custom projects for monitoring machines.
Posted on Reply
#8
AsRock
TPU addict
"lZKoce said:
It's blowing through the Kensigton lock ;)
All that dust that will get in to the usb ports and others lol.


I guess there is no need for vents as there is not HDD and as long as it don't hit 70c they will not care. I know i would and would not buy this cheaply made shit.

I like how they cover the temp part though ha.

Support wide temperature operation- High Stability

The NC01U series uses high quality materials to meet the environmental operation demands of commercial applications. Its rugged design allows for stable operation over long periods of time – even in 50⁰C environments*.
* With use of SSD and Wide Range

And here's a link who into buying cheap crap that's not cheap.

http://global.shuttle.com/products/productsDetail?productId=1941
Posted on Reply
#9
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
Wow, no shit, it really doesn't have an exhaust. I think it will suffer the MacBook Pro complex: you can have your 2.0 GHz clockspeed only if you aren't doing anything on it.

I suppose a Dremel could solve that problem easy enough but it would obviously void the warranty.
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#10
Ferrum Master
there are actualy ribs open in the sides if you look...
Posted on Reply
#11
xorbe
"FordGT90Concept said:
Wow, no shit, it really doesn't have an exhaust.
Do you guys not see the direction of the copper fins, and the slotted plastic on the same side? You can also see a small opening on the opposing side.
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#12
yogurt_21
<div class="youtube-embed" data-id="PqipjMj4FZk"><img src="https://i.ytimg.com/vi/PqipjMj4FZk/hqdefault.jpg" /><div class="youtube-play"></div><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PqipjMj4FZk" target="_blank" class="youtube-title"></a></div>

The ribs are hiding the air vent holes. They are on both sides. Pay attention in the vid and you will see them.

Seems about the same size as the DS57U? You sure its their smallest ever? The intel Nuc is smaller.
Posted on Reply
#13
AsRock
TPU addict
Aah yes those tiny tiny hole's, i guess much better than it did 1st look like. I guess it was just tested in a place they put HDD's together.
Posted on Reply
#14
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
It appears the intake is on the otherside of the case. It pulls air across the interior, into the blower, and then out through the exhaust. A pretty good thermal design, actually.
Posted on Reply
#15
AsRock
TPU addict
Well it does look like it work better than the nuc at least, but if i were to buy some thing like this i be wanting a new case for it. kinda like those NUC ones that are a actually heatsink.

Sure SSD's can take some heat but i don't want mine be getting 50c+ tbh, and on the NUC side a lot worse than that.
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#16
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
I haven't even figured out where the SSD mounts in there. Is it behind the SD card reader?
Posted on Reply
#18
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
On the bottom? That should be relatively cool down there but yeah, I would never put an HDD in there. It has the heat of the processor above it and the surface it is sitting on below it.
Posted on Reply
#19
AsRock
TPU addict
Makes me wounder how hot those SSD's get in those nuc's, as far as i have noticed 70c is max to most SSD makers and those nucs can hit 80c.
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#20
yogurt_21
"AsRock said:
Makes me wounder how hot those SSD's get in those nuc's, as far as i have noticed 70c is max to most SSD makers and those nucs can hit 80c.
never had one hit anywhere near that was this the i7 variant?
Posted on Reply
#21
AsRock
TPU addict
"yogurt_21 said:
never had one hit anywhere near that was this the i7 variant?
So what temps we talking here ?, i know running benchamarks can course the higher than typical temps which is what happening in this video
<div class="youtube-embed" data-id="EkimvAK1g0c"><img src="https://i.ytimg.com/vi/EkimvAK1g0c/hqdefault.jpg" /><div class="youtube-play"></div><a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EkimvAK1g0c" target="_blank" class="youtube-title"></a></div>
Posted on Reply
#22
yogurt_21
so you are talking the i7 variant. I've never seen either the i5 or certainly not the i3 pass 60C no matter what the load. I've actually never seen the i3 pass 50C. But I haven't used the i7 variant so that could explain it.

The i7 is nearly double the wattage of the i5
http://ark.intel.com/products/84993/Intel-Core-i7-5557U-Processor-4M-Cache-up-to-3_40-GHz

http://ark.intel.com/products/85213/Intel-Core-i5-5300U-Processor-3M-Cache-up-to-2_90-GHz

So 28 watts compared with 15 watts. (mostly the graphics difference)

Also he said this was during video editing which isn't a normal Nuc use, he said even with 30C ambient the Nuc was ~ 45-50C under normal use which would be just fine.

Still though this seems to eminate from intel using last gen cooling on their very first i7 nuc.
http://www.legitreviews.com/intel-nuc-kit-nuc5i7ryh-review_163523/2

Not an ideal setup and not something that's an issue with any other version.
Posted on Reply
#23
AsRock
TPU addict
Thing about these reviews is that they typically miss out room temp, But yes temps are good around 50c but it has to have parts they are not going to keep taking that shit.

I think intel just cheeped out as most think it's ok to run shit hot because some of the hardware can take it. To start with solder hates heat like that it can all so course cracking.

Would i get a nuc ?, sure but it would not be in that default box that's for sure and i have a feeling if your SSD fails and that SSD has been over 70c their might be a chance the manufacture would void the warranty to it.
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#24
FordGT90Concept
"I go fast!1!11!1!"
I think his problem was that he didn't go into the UEFI of that NUC and change the target temp. If the fan started at 50C versus 80C, it probably would never reach 80C. The question is: how loud would it get?
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