Tuesday, October 13th 2015

Lexar Announces the JumpDrive M20c USB Type-C Flash Drive

Lexar, a leading global brand of flash memory products, today announced two additions to its mobile USB 3.0 flash drive line: the Lexar JumpDrive M20c and the Lexar JumpDrive M20i. The Lexar JumpDrive M20c is designed for use with next-generation USB Type-C devices, and features two connectors - USB Type-C and USB 3.0 - to allow users to easily share content between smartphones, tablets, and computers. The Lexar JumpDrive M20i is designed for use with iOS devices, enabling users to easily offload and move photos and videos between an iPhone, iPad, and computers.

"The long-awaited reality of Type-C connectivity is here, and the new Lexar JumpDrive M20c is meeting the emerging demand for a solution that allows users to quickly and easily share content across next-generation and legacy devices," said Aaron Lee, director of product marketing, Lexar. "With the endless amount of content being created, captured, and consumed every day, it's easy to run out of space on your smartphone or tablet. Both the Lexar JumpDrive M20c and Lexar JumpDrive M20i provide users with an easy way to transfer, share, and offload content on the go."
Lexar JumpDrive M20c
The Lexar JumpDrive M20c leverages USB 3.0 performance with up to 150MB/s read and 60MB/s write speeds. Users can transfer a 3GB HD video clip in less than one minute, compared to the four minutes it takes using a standard USB 2.0 drive. Its reversible design of the Type-C connector means no fumbling to insert it correctly. It also easily expands the memory of your devices providing more room for your favourite images and videos. For added versatility, the drive is backwards compatible with USB 2.0 devices.

Lexar JumpDrive M20i
The Lexar JumpDrive M20i drive features a Lightning and USB 3.0 connector, making quick work of offloading files on the go-no charging or battery needed, and no network required. It works with the use of a free file management app from the App Store which allows users to back up files when connected, and automatically and securely syncs files on the go. The JumpDrive M20i provides read speeds up to 95MB/s and write speeds up to 20MB/s.** For added versatility, the drive is backwards compatible with USB 2.0 devices.

Both the Lexar JumpDrive M20c and M20i are compatible with PC and Mac systems and come with a three-year limited warranty. Furthermore, all Lexar product designs undergo extensive testing in the Lexar Quality Labs facilities with more than 1,100 digital devices, to ensure performance, quality, compatibility, and reliability. The new JumpDrive M20c USB Type-C flash drives have MSRPs of £16.99 (16GB), £21.99 (32GB), and £33.99 (64GB) and the new JumpDrive M20i have MSRPs of £39.99 (16GB), £54.99 (32GB), and £77.99 (64GB). Both will be available in October.
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11 Comments on Lexar Announces the JumpDrive M20c USB Type-C Flash Drive

#1
Chaitanya
I dont understand why these usb 3.0/3.1 flash drives have such ridiculously low write speeds. even the older M10 has terible write speeds, read speeds are whole another story
Posted on Reply
#2
tomkaten
Not all of them do.

My Corsair New Voyager GT v2 USB 3.0 32GB:

http://i.imgur.com/9VtJPVL.png

Pretty happy with those speeds, there are low end consumer SSDs with worse sequential write speeds.

4k is another matter altogether though...
Posted on Reply
#3
ZeDestructor
tomkaten
Not all of them do.

My Corsair New Voyager GT v2 USB 3.0 32GB:

http://i.imgur.com/9VtJPVL.png

Pretty happy with those speeds, there are low end consumer SSDs with worse sequential write speeds.

4k is another matter altogether though...
Can confirm, here's my SanDisk CZ80 64GB drive (GAM46 revision): https://i.imgur.com/Cdo0kmk.png

It chokes on 4K because it's only got one NAND package, populating just one lane of a not very impressive controller (proprietary SanDisk controller I think, shared with the U100 SSD, with a Fujitsu MB86C31 SATA-USB3 bridge).
Posted on Reply
#4
Baum
Chaitanya
I dont understand why these usb 3.0/3.1 flash drives have such ridiculously low write speeds. even the older M10 has terible write speeds, read speeds are whole another story
good nand used in ssd's maybe?
Posted on Reply
#5
ZeDestructor
Baum
good nand used in ssd's maybe?
Yes, but not really the reason. Real reason, as I said up is all about how the controller is really small and crummy and paired with a single NAND package (instead of the usual 8 NAND packages), so there's no parallel access to massively speed things up.
Posted on Reply
#6
tomkaten
ZeDestructor
Can confirm, here's my SanDisk CZ80 64GB drive (GAM46 revision): https://i.imgur.com/Cdo0kmk.png

It chokes on 4K because it's only got one NAND package, populating just one lane of a not very impressive controller (proprietary SanDisk controller I think, shared with the U100 SSD, with a Fujitsu MB86C31 SATA-USB3 bridge).
Yours is even crazier :)

But seriously, 10 MB/s writes is a lot, considering most 7200 rpm HDDs top out at 1 MB/s.
Posted on Reply
#7
ZeDestructor
tomkaten
Yours is even crazier :)

But seriously, 10 MB/s writes is a lot, considering most 7200 rpm HDDs top out at 1 MB/s.
The best bit is that they're not even that expensive, around 50c/GB
Posted on Reply
#8
Chaitanya
tomkaten
Yours is even crazier :)

But seriously, 10 MB/s writes is a lot, considering most 7200 rpm HDDs top out at 1 MB/s.
What drugs did you inhale today?

Please read this review and maybe others before commenting.
Posted on Reply
#9
ZeDestructor
Chaitanya
What drugs did you inhale today?

Please read this review and maybe others before commenting.
Looks like you need to read said review more than either me or @tomkaten. From the review you linked:

224 IOPS 4K write = 896KiB/s = 0.875 MiB/s, which is indeed less than 1 MiB/s. Read is even worse at at 140 IOPS = 560 KiB/s = 0.547 MiB/s, because the drive can't cache the data to write when ready.

On the sequential side, just over 182MiB/s is juust keeping up with the 150-250MiB/s of my CZ80. If I used a SATA-USB 3 bridge with a 2.5" SATA SSD, it just wouldn't be a competition at all.
Posted on Reply
#10
Chaitanya
ZeDestructor
Looks like you need to read said review more than either me or @tomkaten. From the review you linked:

224 IOPS 4K write = 896KiB/s = 0.875 MiB/s, which is indeed less than 1 MiB/s. Read is even worse at at 140 IOPS = 560 KiB/s = 0.547 MiB/s, because the drive can't cache the data to write when ready.

On the sequential side, just over 182MiB/s is juust keeping up with the 150-250MiB/s of my CZ80. If I used a SATA-USB 3 bridge with a 2.5" SATA SSD, it just wouldn't be a competition at all.
http://anandtech.com/show/9606/wd-red-pro-6-tb-review-a-nas-hdd-for-the-performance-conscious/3

http://anandtech.com/show/8794/hgst-deskstar-nas-6-tb-review/3

Sure for small random workloads HDDs seem to fall flat but in most day to day client workloads, HDDs still provide write speeds in range of 60-70MBps.
Posted on Reply
#11
tomkaten
It chokes on 4K because it's only got one NAND package, populating just one lane of a not very impressive controller (proprietary SanDisk controller I think, shared with the U100 SSD, with a Fujitsu MB86C31 SATA-USB3 bridge).
Pretty happy with those speeds, there are low end consumer SSDs with worse sequential write speeds.

4k is another matter altogether though...
@ZeDestructor and I were talking about 4k performance and his "puny" flash stick is 10 times faster than a HDD there.

Insulting random people on the internet over cherry picked phrases while completely ignoring the main point is not very mature.
Posted on Reply
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