Thursday, December 17th 2015

Thermalright Announces the Macho Direct CPU Cooler

Introducing the Macho Direct from Thermalright. With the Macho Direct we present our first Heatpipe Direct Touch cooler. We are expecting it to reach the top of the HDT-cooler charts thanks to its particular conception. The cooler is based on the proven Macho-Design and is aimed at customers who are looking for an effective cooler at a budget.

The successful concept of the powerful heatsink, which is still aligned to the rear, was not changed. The Macho Direct also uses the special design of the aluminum cooling fins - indicative for a very low air resistance - that has been optimized for low running fans. Several openings counteract the accumulation of air between the cooling fins, so that an optimum air exchange is ensured.
The main feature of the Macho Direct are the specially designed, concave formed heat pipes, which allow a very effective heat exchange from the CPU. The patented design of the heatpipes, which have not been ground flat, gives the Macho Direct a cooling capacity that's outstanding for a HDT cooler.

Another highlight of the Macho Direct is the reduced installation height. Because of its conception as direct touch heatpipe cooler, the "Direct" is 4 mm lower than the Macho Rev. B. This makes it possible to mount the Macho Direct in even more cases. At the same time, the weight of the Macho Direct with a fan mounted is at 820g lower as well.

A TY 140 Black PWM-fan is included with the cooler. The fan is equipped with a low-wearing "Enhanced Hyper-Flow Bearing". Thanks to the very low starting speed of just 300 rpm and the maximum speed of only 1,300 rpm, the black fan runs very silently at 15 - 21 dB(a) and is almost inaudible while running.

In Germany, the Macho Direct will be sold exclusively by the Mindfactory AG. The MSRP is 36.99 Euro, incl. 19% VAT.
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21 Comments on Thermalright Announces the Macho Direct CPU Cooler

#1
LTUGamer
All time HDT was huge question to me. Why almost all cheap low weight coolers (CM 212 EVO, Raijintek Themis, Enermax T40, Xigmatek Loki, Deepcool S40...) features HDT while big ones (Noctua D15, Phanteks PH-TC14PE, Scythe Ninja, Raijintek Ereboss...) practically never haves it?
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#2
lZKoce
It's HDT, but without CDC :p
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#3
trog100
i think its all about mechanical strength and rigidity.. the direct touch heat pipes will be cheaper to make as well..

this cooler looks like it will do the business and at a good price.. :)

trog
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#4
RejZoR
I don't think I'll be ever going back to tower air coolers. The AiO's are just so powerful and practical. I mean, the fact that you can offset the CPU cooler mass away from the CPU socket is huge. You can place the radiator pretty much anywhere (I've screwed mine into the front and I don't even have mount points for a fan there!). And it's really practical to clean dust as well.
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#5
Ferrum Master
Cheap cooler... fine... for that price, who cares...

The fans for TR aren't the best ones... They use cheap kind of unfinished plastic. I got the TY147A recently, was rather unpleased by that.

Actually in the picture you can see it too. Uneven cut edges. Bumps, some uneven surfaces. Well, Vardar costs about the same and is much better...

I simply had to get rid of the shitty colored thing in between my heatsink...
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#6
acperience7
LTUGamer said:
All time HDT was huge question to me. Why almost all cheap low weight coolers (CM 212 EVO, Raijintek Themis, Enermax T40, Xigmatek Loki, Deepcool S40...) features HDT while big ones (Noctua D15, Phanteks PH-TC14PE, Scythe Ninja, Raijintek Ereboss...) practically never haves it?
I wonder the same thing. I'm in the market for a new air cooler, and I was thinking they would more prevalent than they are. They seem to work well.
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#7
Chloe Price
Five heatpipes against the six in my Macho rev. A :/
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#8
P4-630
The Way It's Meant to be Played
How about the skylake bentgate, is it safe for skylake :rolleyes:
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#9
[502]
LTUGamer said:
All time HDT was huge question to me. Why almost all cheap low weight coolers (CM 212 EVO, Raijintek Themis, Enermax T40, Xigmatek Loki, Deepcool S40...) features HDT while big ones (Noctua D15, Phanteks PH-TC14PE, Scythe Ninja, Raijintek Ereboss...) practically never haves it?
Quite possibly that DHT limits the number of heat pipes touching the CPU. I think 5 is the maximum reasonable number of heat pipes touching CPU IHS to be considered effective, and the number shrinks with smaller size CPUs. More than that and it's not very effective. That's why lower end air cooler often use DHT because they use lower number of heat pipes compared to high end ones. With high end air cooler almost all manufacturers uses six or more heatpipes, and while they're not directly touching the CPU, they can transfer the heat effectively across all heat pipes.
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#10
iO
I wonder if that new mounting system still puts that ridiculous amount of pressure on the cpu..
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#11
MxPhenom 216
Corsair Fanboy
RejZoR said:
I don't think I'll be ever going back to tower air coolers. The AiO's are just so powerful and practical. I mean, the fact that you can offset the CPU cooler mass away from the CPU socket is huge. You can place the radiator pretty much anywhere (I've screwed mine into the front and I don't even have mount points for a fan there!). And it's really practical to clean dust as well.
And loud. Most of the AIO pumps suck.
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#12
RejZoR
It's not loud at all. If anyone would know that it's me. I don't run fans off the pump header. I run my fans at custom speeds which are usually at vey low RPM. Idle is around 60--800 RPM and under load max 1200 RPM. Meaning if pump was in fact loud, I'd hear it. But I don't.
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#13
MxPhenom 216
Corsair Fanboy
RejZoR said:
It's not loud at all. If anyone would know that it's me. I don't run fans off the pump header. I run my fans at custom speeds which are usually at vey low RPM. Idle is around 60--800 RPM and under load max 1200 RPM. Meaning if pump was in fact loud, I'd hear it. But I don't.
You mean of all the people that would know that is @crazyeyesreaper. Seeing how hes review probably more AIO than you have used.
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#14
Ferrum Master
RejZoR said:
It's not loud at all. If anyone would know that it's me. I don't run fans off the pump header. I run my fans at custom speeds which are usually at vey low RPM. Idle is around 60--800 RPM and under load max 1200 RPM. Meaning if pump was in fact loud, I'd hear it. But I don't.
They are loud and that is a fact...

how one is tolerant(deaf) to it, that's a different question.

During surfing I cannot stand any of my fans going over 500RPM, anything more gets on my nerves. The Pump is the stupid critter. And with time they tend to be more louder and resonate.
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#15
RejZoR
Lol, NO. NO. NOPE. NOOOOOOPE. People who review AiO's run them using pump headers and stock fans. When I tried that I was like fuck me, how is that silent in any way!? It was like a freaking jet turbine. The pump could be grinding itself to a death and you wouldn't even know it because fans are that stupendously loud. Only time I ever hear a pump is when I actually open the case and stick my head next to a pump. 5cm distance. Then I hear something flowing inside there. Or if air gets into it, then I hear it. All the other time, no, ANY fan and I literally mean ANY fan is noisier than pump in my AiO. Trust me, I go ballistic if some shit is making any kind of out of the ordinary noise. Unless my ANTEC H2O 920 is such a brilliant AiO that it has the best pump ever and all the others suck and are noisy. Fans are run off a motherboard header with custom fan curve. Fans are Enermax Twister pressure set to lowest PWM profile. Enclosed in a sound isolated case.
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#16
Ferrum Master
RejZoR said:
Lol, NO. NO. NOPE. NOOOOOOPE. People who review AiO's run them using pump headers and stock fans. When I tried that I was like fuck me, how is that silent in any way!? It was like a freaking jet turbine. The pump could be grinding itself to a death and you wouldn't even know it because fans are that stupendously loud. Only time I ever hear a pump is when I actually open the case and stick my head next to a pump. 5cm distance. Then I hear something flowing inside there. Or if air gets into it, then I hear it. All the other time, no, ANY fan and I literally mean ANY fan is noisier than pump in my AiO. Trust me, I go ballistic if some shit is making any kind of out of the ordinary noise. Unless my ANTEC H2O 920 is such a brilliant AiO that it has the best pump ever and all the others suck and are noisy. Fans are run off a motherboard header with custom fan curve. Fans are Enermax Twister pressure set to lowest PWM profile. Enclosed in a sound isolated case.
Did I just read 50 shades of the pump? :D
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#17
RejZoR
Actually, it was 50 shades of noise. :P
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#18
SteveS45
HDT is more of a cost down method more than anything. But as long as your get the performance you want for the price you think reasonable then there's not much to lose.

Don't believe for a second that the CPU touching the heatpipes directly means better performance, that's just marketing talking on paper theory. In practice you always lose out on some performance when you go HDT. If HDT were the way to go, then the ultra competitive dual towers from CRYORIG, Nocuta, Phanteks and Thermalright would be using HDT instead of using the more expensive solid copper block base.
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#19
Chaitanya
RejZoR said:
I don't think I'll be ever going back to tower air coolers. The AiO's are just so powerful and practical. I mean, the fact that you can offset the CPU cooler mass away from the CPU socket is huge. You can place the radiator pretty much anywhere (I've screwed mine into the front and I don't even have mount points for a fan there!). And it's really practical to clean dust as well.
Come and make the same comment once the galvanic corrosion(due to mixing of Aluminium and Copper) take a toll on pump after maybe 1.5-2 years of constant use. except for Swiftech and EKWB AIO I personally wouldn't pick up any Asetek or Coolermaster AIO as both use Aluminium Radiator with Copper CPU blocks.

Edit: depending on manufacturer these high end heatsinks can easily survive for 4-5 years and can be used for PC upgrade 3-4 years down the line.
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#20
RejZoR
My unit is like 3 years old and has thousands of hours of runtime. Still quiet. Like I said, it only gets louder if I get air into the pump, usually when fiddling with the cooler and I'm rotating it too much and air gets into the pump. Other than that, I can only hear slight pump buzzing at 5cm from the pump.
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#21
niboar
With or without backplate this time?

Thermalright removed the backplate on the Macho 120 rev.a compared to the original.
I'm pissed not to have one, on a heavy cpu cooler it has an actual function.
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