Thursday, January 7th 2016

EVGA Introduces New and Innovative Products at CES 2016

EVGA kicks off 2016 with over five new and innovative product lines introduced at CES 2016. These new products further set EVGA apart from the competition and prove that EVGA is the leader for high performance computing products. The new products announced today will be shipping in 2016.

Among the products EVGA launched, are the revolutionary new SC17 Gaming Notebook, the GeForce GTX 980 Ti VR Edition graphics card, the Quick-release CPU/Quick-release GPU series AIO coolers that allow you to break the loop; a new high-end gaming PC case, and a high-end audio card.

EVGA SC17 Gaming Laptop - Built for the Enthusiast Gamer and Power User
  • 100% EVGA in-House design from the ground Up
  • GPU, CPU and Memory Superclock support with software and GUI BIOS
  • 4K ready (G-SYNC and non G-SYNC)
  • Unibody design with 1.05 inch (2.65cm) thickness including RJ45
  • USB 3.1 TypeC support
EVGA GeForce GTX 980 Ti VR Edition - Designed for Easy VR Gaming
  • Includes drive bay to allow front HDMI/USB 3.0 access
  • Mini HDMI directly on card
  • NVIDIA GeForce GTX 980 Ti GPU with 2816 CUDA Cores
  • Available in Blower and ACX 2.0+ Versions
EVGA QRC/QRG (Quick Release CPU/ Quick Release GPU) Water Cooling - Closed Loop Water Cooling Solution Without Limits
  • Fully expandable closed loop watercooling solution for CPU's and GPU's
  • Quick disconnect/connect allows ultimate flexibility, up to 4-Way SLI and multiple CPUs!
  • Add additional radiators for improved performance
  • Software suite allows full monitoring and control
EVGA Gaming Case (Final Name TBA) - First PC Gaming Case Designed for GPU Cooling
  • Direct airflow path allows significantly lower GPU temperatures
  • Specifically designed for extreme gaming enthusiast
  • Flexible cooling design supports both air and/or water cooling
  • Modular system allows for customizing and future upgradability
EVGA Pro Audio Card (Final Name TBA) - Designed for the Enthusiast Gamer & Audiophile
  • State of the art audio fidelity
  • True analog engineering for lifelike audio reproduction
  • 130dB+ SNR (Signal to Noise Ratio)
  • Available in PCI Express x1 add on card or external USB solution
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29 Comments on EVGA Introduces New and Innovative Products at CES 2016

#1
matar
Great work EVGA the PC case is nice I think this is my next case in my next PC build.
Posted on Reply
#2
lZKoce
EVGA dropped da hammer . Pure awesomeness right there.

Pretty straight forward naming scheme for the case line. I mean "Gaming case" ...it clearly communicates the purpose of its existence . Doesn't make it any less cool though.
Posted on Reply
#3
Petey Plane
I do like the case but the claim "First PC Gaming Case Designed for GPU Cooling" is crap. Both Lian-Li and Silverstone have sold cases in the past with an unobstructed airflow path between the intake fans and the PCI slots.

That being said, if the case comes in under $200, it'll be at the top of my list for the new build i'm planning. I won't use an EVGA mobo though. They're overpriced and lack a lot of the features of the ASUS and Gigabyte boards. A long warranty and supposedly good customer support seem to be EVGA mobos' only benefits.

The USB and HDMI bay device for VR headsets is a great idea though.
Posted on Reply
#4
PP Mguire
Wonder what size rads we'll be seeing and how easy it'll be to hide how ugly so many QDCs are in a case.
Posted on Reply
#5
Patriot
I have really liked their cases, except for the big evga brand moniker.
Posted on Reply
#6
dwade
Moar ITX cases plz eVGA!!!
Posted on Reply
#7
Ferrum Master
I want the sound cards specs... I think it is the Sabre32... If yes I want a proper bare metal review guys!
Posted on Reply
#8
R-T-B
Patriot said:
I have really liked their cases, except for the big evga brand moniker.
Meh, they like to do that on all their stuff. At least their warranty terms tend to be awesome.
Posted on Reply
#9
ZoneDymo
Most interested in that soundcard
Posted on Reply
#10
Mistral
That case looks bloody solid. Definitely a contender for a build this year.
Posted on Reply
#11
Rich Knapp
lZKoce said:
EVGA dropped da hammer . Pure awesomeness right there.

Pretty straight forward naming scheme for the case line. I mean "Gaming case" ...it clearly communicates the purpose of its existence . Doesn't make it any less cool though.
Was thinking the exact same thing! Had to respond! "Gaming Case", really??? Come on now! EVGA needs to put their thinking caps on a bit here. I'm almost sure they can come up with a better name for their premier case!

Update: Unless they just revised this article, or I just missed it....
EVGA Gaming Case (Final Name TBA)

My Bad!
Posted on Reply
#12
lemonadesoda
Abuse of the word innovation. Call the grammar police. There is no innovation here, just updating a product line based on chipset refreshes, plus a little "design" on the top. Nice products, yes. Innovation, no.
Posted on Reply
#13
lZKoce
lemonadesoda said:
Abuse of the word innovation. Call the grammar police. There is no innovation here, just updating a product line based on chipset refreshes, plus a little "design" on the top. Nice products, yes. Innovation, no.
Well, it we are very picky, there is innovation: incremental . Still the same base, but with improvements. There might be no disruptive innovation, but we do have some movement. I mean the reports on the general meeting with the investors have to stay positive and we have to pepper them with the word innovation ;)
Posted on Reply
#14
lemonadesoda
lZKoce said:
Well, it we are very picky, there is innovation: incremental . *snip ;)
... you've been "marketed to" so much, your understanding of what the word innovation means has become abused itself. Turn yourself into the National Clinic for the Rehabilitation of the Overmarketed, but don't take the green pills
Posted on Reply
#15
Corsair George
Corsair Rep
Petey Plane said:
I do like the case but the claim "First PC Gaming Case Designed for GPU Cooling" is crap. Both Lian-Li and Silverstone have sold cases in the past with an unobstructed airflow path between the intake fans and the PCI slots.

That being said, if the case comes in under $200, it'll be at the top of my list for the new build i'm planning. I won't use an EVGA mobo though. They're overpriced and lack a lot of the features of the ASUS and Gigabyte boards. A long warranty and supposedly good customer support seem to be EVGA mobos' only benefits.

The USB and HDMI bay device for VR headsets is a great idea though.
I think that case is very interesting, it'd be nice to see a picture of it instead of a render though. Looks like it could be a long time before it's actually released.

From my experience - that design has a TON of parts in it and as such the tooling and cost will be quite high. Depending on the materials they use and thickness of it I'd wager that case is over $200 easily.
Posted on Reply
#16
Easy Rhino
Linux Advocate
btarunr said:

EVGA Pro Audio Card (Final Name TBA) - Designed for the Enthusiast Gamer & Audiophile
  • State of the art audio fidelity
  • True analog engineering for lifelike audio reproduction
  • 130dB+ SNR (Signal to Noise Ratio)
  • Available in PCI Express x1 add on card or external USB solution

Uh? A Pro audio card with no toslink ? Also, what is "true analog engineering?" Do they just mean "engineering?"
Posted on Reply
#17
ZoneDymo
Easy Rhino said:
Uh? A Pro audio card with no toslink ? Also, what is "true analog engineering?" Do they just mean "engineering?"
I never understood why toslink would be a on a high end soundcard, does that not mean the card sends some digital signal to another device and then THAT device would have to change it to analog so we can hear it?
Meaning what would the soundcard add to the quality of the sound, would it not all be that last device doing the work?
Posted on Reply
#18
Easy Rhino
Linux Advocate
ZoneDymo said:
I never understood why toslink would be a on a high end soundcard, does that not mean the card sends some digital signal to another device and then THAT device would have to change it to analog so we can hear it?
Meaning what would the soundcard add to the quality of the sound, would it not all be that last device doing the work?
That's like asking why digital audio exists at all. Obviously all audio we hear is analog and audio is created as analog. Since this is a sound card attached to a digital device you want digital output components like toslink so that you dont lose any signal once it gets to your ears.
Posted on Reply
#19
PP Mguire
Corsair George said:
I think that case is very interesting, it'd be nice to see a picture of it instead of a render though. Looks like it could be a long time before it's actually released.

From my experience - that design has a TON of parts in it and as such the tooling and cost will be quite high. Depending on the materials they use and thickness of it I'd wager that case is over $200 easily.
Tek Syn has a video of it from CES and running their own AIO setup.
Posted on Reply
#20
CrAsHnBuRnXp
For as nice as that case is, i dont keep it on my desk so those IO ports on the side are useless to me. Thanks EVGA.
Posted on Reply
#21
ZoneDymo
Easy Rhino said:
That's like asking why digital audio exists at all. Obviously all audio we hear is analog and audio is created as analog. Since this is a sound card attached to a digital device you want digital output components like toslink so that you dont lose any signal once it gets to your ears.
I'm afraid I don't quite understand what you are saying here.
Yes your computer is digital, the sound from it is a digital signal.
That digital sound has to be converted to analogue so we in the ermm "real world" can hear it.

Its that conversion where a soundcard is suppose to do a better job then lets say build in (the motherboard) audio.
If the soundcard uses toslink (digital), that has to be then send to a receiver that can take such a signal and then that device would have to convert the digital signal to analogue meaning the receiver is responsible for the audio quality we hear and not the soundcard (rendering it to my understanding useless).

When you use the analogue phono connections on the back of the soundcard to connect it to a receiver then its the soundcard doing the conversion and just sends the converted analogue signal to a receiver which can then power the speakers.
Posted on Reply
#22
Easy Rhino
Linux Advocate
ZoneDymo said:


Its that conversion where a soundcard is suppose to do a better job then lets say build in (the motherboard) audio.
If the soundcard uses toslink (digital), that has to be then send to a receiver that can take such a signal and then that device would have to convert the digital signal to analogue meaning the receiver is responsible for the audio quality we hear and not the soundcard (rendering it to my understanding useless).

When you use the analogue phono connections on the back of the soundcard to connect it to a receiver then its the soundcard doing the conversion and just sends the converted analogue signal to a receiver which can then power the speakers.
Right, and in my opinion, a high end sound card should have toslink because people interested in high fidelity are most likely attaching an amp between their soundcard and their speakers/headphones. There is no signal loss between the soundcard and the amp if using toslink. There is signal loss using an analog connection. So to reduce signal loss when using an amp it should be digital.
Posted on Reply
#23
cadaveca
My name is Dave
ZoneDymo said:
I'm afraid I don't quite understand what you are saying here.
Yes your computer is digital, the sound from it is a digital signal.
That digital sound has to be converted to analogue so we in the ermm "real world" can hear it.

Its that conversion where a soundcard is suppose to do a better job then lets say build in (the motherboard) audio.
If the soundcard uses toslink (digital), that has to be then send to a receiver that can take such a signal and then that device would have to convert the digital signal to analogue meaning the receiver is responsible for the audio quality we hear and not the soundcard (rendering it to my understanding useless).

When you use the analogue phono connections on the back of the soundcard to connect it to a receiver then its the soundcard doing the conversion and just sends the converted analogue signal to a receiver which can then power the speakers.
It is still possible for a sound card to add some signal processing and then convert the processed signal back into, well, say, DTS or DD, and then pass it to an external device. I use a older high-end HT receiver at my desk, using optical to connect to it, and there are very obvious audible differences between devices. So yeah, I want a good card to passa fantastic digital signal down to my receiver at my feet Do keep in mind I have tested hundreds of audio solutions via different motherboards..
Posted on Reply
#24
ZoneDymo
cadaveca said:
It is still possible for a sound card to add some signal processing and then convert the processed signal back into, well, say, DTS or DD, and then pass it to an external device. I use a older high-end HT receiver at my desk, using optical to connect to it, and there are very obvious audible differences between devices. So yeah, I want a good card to passa fantastic digital signal down to my receiver at my feet Do keep in mind I have tested hundreds of audio solutions via different motherboards..
So digital is not just digital?
I mean I have always heard that 100 dollar HDMI cables are bs because 0s and 1s are just 0s and 1s and there are no better 0s and 1s.
Posted on Reply
#25
ZoneDymo
Easy Rhino said:
Right, and in my opinion, a high end sound card should have toslink because people interested in high fidelity are most likely attaching an amp between their soundcard and their speakers/headphones. There is no signal loss between the soundcard and the amp if using toslink. There is signal loss using an analog connection. So to reduce signal loss when using an amp it should be digital.
Even though cadaveca kinda answered it, Im asking you this, what is the benefit of a soundcard if you are going to have the amp do the D to A conversion?
Many motherboards have build in toslink/spdif, why not just use that if you are going to let the amp do the work?
Posted on Reply
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